Loki TV Show: Release Date Info, Story Details, & Cast

Thor’s brother Loki, the god of mischief, is getting his own TV show on Disney+, so here’s everything we know about it so far. Tim Hiddleston has so far played Loki in six Marvel Cinematic Universe movies, starting with 2011’s Thor and most recently appearing in Avengers: Endgame during a “time heist” that revisited the events of The Avengers. Loki has been everything from an untrustworthy ally to an outright villain in the Marvel movies, but now he’ll be the star of his very own series.

Loki‘s showrunner is Michael Waldron, who previously worked on Community and Rick and Morty, so we can probably expect him to bring some comedy elements to the show. Currently Loki is being planned as a miniseries, but there’s always the possibility of a continuation into multiple seasons if it proves successful.

Related: The Problem With Loki In Marvel Phase 4

He may be a rascal, but Loki is as well-loved as any of the Avengers (perhaps even more), and fans are eager to see him back on the screen. From release date information to plot details, here’s everything we know about Loki so far.

Disney+ is set to launch in the United States on November 12, 2019, but Loki won’t be available on the streaming service immediately. In fact, the show is still quite a long way off. Along with WandaVision, Loki is being planned for Year 2 – meaning that it will release some time between November 2020 and November 2021. There are two scripted Marvel series being planned for Year 1 of Disney+: team-up show Falcon & Winter Soldier, and animated series What If…?

Fans who watched Loki die (admittedly not for the first time) in Avengers: Infinity War may be confused by him returning in a TV show – but it’s easily explained. According to the official synopsis, Loki follows Thor’s unruly (adopted) brother as he “pops up throughout human history as [an] unlikely influencer on historical events.” It’s possible that the version of Loki we’ll see in the show is one from the timeline where he escaped Avengers custody with the Tesseract, and that he interferes with human history via his own means of time travel. Alternatively, this may be a prequel series set prior to the events of Thor, with Loki dropping by Earth to meddle whenever he gets bored. Whichever is the case, the first image from the show confirmed that one episode will see Loki popping up in the 1975 – based on Jaws playing in theaters.

It’s still early days for Loki, which may not start filming for a year or more, so there hasn’t been any news regarding supporting cast members. Hiddleston will reprise his role as Loki as the series’ lead, and it would be surprising if Chris Hemsworth didn’t at least drop in for a cameo, given his love of side projects like Team Thor.

More: Every Exclusive Movie & TV Show Coming To Disney Plus


2019-07-14 04:07:41

Hannah Shaw-Williams

Spider-Man: Far From Home’s Fury & Captain Marvel Moment Makes No Sense

Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s shout-out to Captain Marvel is arguably the movie’s most confusing moment. Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) barked at Peter Parker (Tom Holland) for even mentioning Carol Danvers but, in light of the revelation that Talos the Skrull (Ben Mendelsohn) was posing as Fury all along in Spider-Man: Far From Home, his reaction to Peter asking about Captain Marvel takes on an entirely different context – although it still doesn’t entirely make sense.

Picking up in 2o24, eight months after Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home spotlights how the Marvel Cinematic Universe is dealing with the aftermath of The Blip, which is the new name for Thanos’ snap. For Peter, the summer after Avengers: Endgame was a chance to go on a European vacation with his friends and tell MJ (Zendaya) how he feels about her – until Nick Fury sabotages Peter’s holiday and recruits Spider-Man to help Quentin Beck aka Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) save the world. Of course, it turns out the global crisis of other-dimensional Elemental monsters was created by the real villain, Mysterio, to trick the world so he can become the new Iron Man, i.e. the world’s greatest superhero.

Related: Spider-Man: Far From Home’s 20 Biggest Unanswered Questions

But before Peter found out the truth about Beck, he was reluctantly tapped by Fury and brought to the spy’s operating base in Venice, Italy. Once he understood that fighting the Elementals would pull Peter away from what he really wanted – a vacation with his friends and his romantic chance with MJ – Spider-Man bowed out of the mission and suggested some alternate choices, like Thor, who is in outer space, and Doctor Strange, who is “unavailable”. But when Peter mentioned Captain Marvel, Fury/Talos snapped, “Don’t invoke her name!

The line plays as one of Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s many jokes and MCU references, but is there a deeper reason for Fury/Talos’ curious response to invoking Captain Marvel’s name? One way to look at it is that Talos is intensely loyal to Captain Marvel and, given what Talos and the Skrulls owe her, it’s understandable why the affable shapeshifter would be protective of Carol Danvers. Indeed, Carol turned against the Kree Starforce (who were manipulating her and keeping her powers in check) and fought on the side of the Skrulls, who were being exterminated by the Kree. Captain Marvel ended with Carol escorting the Skrulls to find a new homeworld in another part of the universe. Essentially, Captain Marvel reunited Talos with his wife Soren (Sharon Blynn) and saved his people so it’s natural the Skrull would feel he owes her everything.

And perhaps, having knowledge of how busy Danvers is (as evidenced by Captain Marvel missing much of Avengers: Endgame so that she can police the galaxy), Talos simply felt she shouldn’t need to be bothered by coming back to Earth to deal with the Elementals, especially when the Terran homeworld has the Avengers and other superheroes to call upon – like Spider-Man.

However, there’s another potential way to look at Fury/ Talos getting angry at Peter mentioning Captain Marvel: what if the Skrull is actually angry at her for some unknown reason? After all, the events of Captain Marvel occurred in 1995, which was 29 years before Spider-Man: Far From Home. A lot of things could have transpired between Talos/the Skrulls and Carol Danvers during those three decades and we know Talos returned to Earth and became Nick Fury’s double for an unknown amount of time, along with Soren, who poses as Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders). The real Fury is, in fact, working with the Skrulls on a secret mission in outer space, possibly to establish S.W.O.R.D., the outer-space version of S.H.I.E.L.D., in order to counteract Kree sleeper cells on Earth.

Therefore, it’s possible that at some point between 1995 and 2024, Captain Marvel and Talos had a falling out or that whatever the Skrulls and the real Nick Fury are working on is something they don’t necessarily want to involve Carol Danvers. While there isn’t much info to go on, trying to understand the context of why Fury/Talos wanted Captain Marvel’s name kept off the table is the only way to make that moment in Spider-Man: Far From Home make sense.

Next: Spider-Man: Far From Home Ending Explained (In Detail)


2019-07-14 02:07:24

John Orquiola

Spider-Man: Far From Home’s Fury & Captain Marvel Moment Makes No Sense

Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s shout-out to Captain Marvel is arguably the movie’s most confusing moment. Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) barked at Peter Parker (Tom Holland) for even mentioning Carol Danvers but, in light of the revelation that Talos the Skrull (Ben Mendelsohn) was posing as Fury all along in Spider-Man: Far From Home, his reaction to Peter asking about Captain Marvel takes on an entirely different context – although it still doesn’t entirely make sense.

Picking up in 2o24, eight months after Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home spotlights how the Marvel Cinematic Universe is dealing with the aftermath of The Blip, which is the new name for Thanos’ snap. For Peter, the summer after Avengers: Endgame was a chance to go on a European vacation with his friends and tell MJ (Zendaya) how he feels about her – until Nick Fury sabotages Peter’s holiday and recruits Spider-Man to help Quentin Beck aka Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) save the world. Of course, it turns out the global crisis of other-dimensional Elemental monsters was created by the real villain, Mysterio, to trick the world so he can become the new Iron Man, i.e. the world’s greatest superhero.

Related: Spider-Man: Far From Home’s 20 Biggest Unanswered Questions

But before Peter found out the truth about Beck, he was reluctantly tapped by Fury and brought to the spy’s operating base in Venice, Italy. Once he understood that fighting the Elementals would pull Peter away from what he really wanted – a vacation with his friends and his romantic chance with MJ – Spider-Man bowed out of the mission and suggested some alternate choices, like Thor, who is in outer space, and Doctor Strange, who is “unavailable”. But when Peter mentioned Captain Marvel, Fury/Talos snapped, “Don’t invoke her name!

The line plays as one of Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s many jokes and MCU references, but is there a deeper reason for Fury/Talos’ curious response to invoking Captain Marvel’s name? One way to look at it is that Talos is intensely loyal to Captain Marvel and, given what Talos and the Skrulls owe her, it’s understandable why the affable shapeshifter would be protective of Carol Danvers. Indeed, Carol turned against the Kree Starforce (who were manipulating her and keeping her powers in check) and fought on the side of the Skrulls, who were being exterminated by the Kree. Captain Marvel ended with Carol escorting the Skrulls to find a new homeworld in another part of the universe. Essentially, Captain Marvel reunited Talos with his wife Soren (Sharon Blynn) and saved his people so it’s natural the Skrull would feel he owes her everything.

And perhaps, having knowledge of how busy Danvers is (as evidenced by Captain Marvel missing much of Avengers: Endgame so that she can police the galaxy), Talos simply felt she shouldn’t need to be bothered by coming back to Earth to deal with the Elementals, especially when the Terran homeworld has the Avengers and other superheroes to call upon – like Spider-Man.

However, there’s another potential way to look at Fury/ Talos getting angry at Peter mentioning Captain Marvel: what if the Skrull is actually angry at her for some unknown reason? After all, the events of Captain Marvel occurred in 1995, which was 29 years before Spider-Man: Far From Home. A lot of things could have transpired between Talos/the Skrulls and Carol Danvers during those three decades and we know Talos returned to Earth and became Nick Fury’s double for an unknown amount of time, along with Soren, who poses as Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders). The real Fury is, in fact, working with the Skrulls on a secret mission in outer space, possibly to establish S.W.O.R.D., the outer-space version of S.H.I.E.L.D., in order to counteract Kree sleeper cells on Earth.

Therefore, it’s possible that at some point between 1995 and 2024, Captain Marvel and Talos had a falling out or that whatever the Skrulls and the real Nick Fury are working on is something they don’t necessarily want to involve Carol Danvers. While there isn’t much info to go on, trying to understand the context of why Fury/Talos wanted Captain Marvel’s name kept off the table is the only way to make that moment in Spider-Man: Far From Home make sense.

Next: Spider-Man: Far From Home Ending Explained (In Detail)


2019-07-14 02:07:24

John Orquiola

Reservoir Dogs Ending Explained: What Happened To Mr. Pink?

The ending of Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs wraps up numerous character arcs, but remains somewhat cryptic about Mr. Pink’s fate. As a whole, the highly-influential crime film underlines the camaraderie that emerges from pulling off a big heist, but also pinpoints the egocentric behavior of the main players. Reservoir Dogs concludes with a Mexican standoff; a bloody moment of misunderstanding that opens the door, both literally and figuratively, for Mr. Pink to escape. Reservoir Dogs ends with retribution and justice for a murdered cop, along with a cryptic bit of sound design connected to Mr. Pink’s fate.

With Reservoir Dogs, Tarantino sets himself apart from other first-time feature directors with an unorthodox narrative structure. The movie begins with an iconic diner scene that introduces the titular dogs, thus establishing their motivations and personal quirks. From there, Reservoir Dogs jumps back and forth with time, creating a sense of confusion for the audience while the subjects attempt to piece together the facts themselves. The objective: to execute a diamond heist in Los Angeles. A gangster named Joe Cabot (Lawrence Tierney) organizes the job, with the assistance of his son “Nice Guy” Eddie (Chris Penn). The Cabots recruit various men, and Joe makes it blatantly clear that no real-life names or personal details should be revealed. The crew includes Mr. White (Harvey Keitel), Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen), Mr. Blue (Edward Bunker), Mr. Brown (Tarantino), Mr. Pink (Steve Buscemi), and Mr. Orange (Tim Roth), the last of whom is revealed to be an undercover police officer.

Related: 15 Crazy Things You Didn’t Know About Reservoir Dogs

Through slick editing, Reservoir Dogs implies certain information without showing the specifics. The heist escape goes horribly wrong, and the crew meets up at a warehouse. Mr. Pink hides the diamonds and walks out after the Mexican stand-off, leaving Mr. White to process Mr. Orange’s revelation about his real identity. Reservoir Dogs features an all-star cast, and the gritty tale shows what happens when greed and deception override tactical strategy. Here’s a breakdown of Tarantino’s blood-soaked Reservoir Dogs finale, including what happened to Mr. Pink.

Mr. Orange & Why Reservoir Dogs’ Robbery Failed 

Despite careful planning, Reservoir Dogs’ focal heist was doomed from the start, evidenced by a late-movie sequence that details Mr. Orange’s backstory. For narrative clarification, Tarantino includes graphics to underline the character focus. For the section entitled “Mr. Orange,” Roth’s character prepares to infiltrate the Cabot clan; he learns to act like a gangster and – more specifically – how to tell a joke like a gangster. It’s all in the details. In terms of filmmaking, Tarantino initially presents Mr. Orange as one of the guys. The opening diner conversation is full of pop culture references, and specifies character traits for each individual. After the stylized open, which includes a famous wide shot of the crew, Tarantino jumps ahead to the heist’s aftermath. Mr. Orange panics in the back of a car, shot in the belly and thoroughly shook up. Similarly, Mr. White struggles to keep his cool as he attempts to not only drive but also calm his partner. There’s a noticeable bond between the two men; they hold hands and hope for the best. There’s a father-son dynamic between the characters, thus making the finale even more tragic.

In Reservoir Dogs, the heist escape fails because the police were tipped off by Mr. Orange. Crucially, the heist itself was indeed successful, albeit with some major setbacks. At the warehouse, the titular dogs seal their own fates by failing to trust each other. It’s revealed that Mr. Blonde killed numerous civilians, and Mr. Pink is purely convinced that the police not only knew about the job, but that they were waiting for them to leave as well. A brief flashback moment shows Mr. Pink running for his life, and a subsequent car scene ends with Mr. Orange taking a bullet to the gut. On the surface, Mr. Orange’s deception connects the narrative dots. But Reservoir Dogs is fundamentally about what takes place after the fact – all the contrived bravado and confusion.

When stripping Reservoir Dogs down to its core, the robbery and escape failed because of the heightened male machismo and pride. Wisely, Tarantino removes himself from the equation, but only after a memorable opening sequence that depicts the director as someone worthy of hanging with the crew. By the middle section, Tarantino shifts focus to character motivations, along with the fact that the Cabots and Mr. Blonde have an existing relationship. Crucially, Mr. Blonde has been in the clink. In Reservoir Dogs, he presents a cool and collected image, evidenced by the famous torture scene, in which the character cuts off a cop’s ear while dancing to Stealers Wheel’s “Stuck in the Middle with You.” But even though Mr. Blonde may be reliable, he proves to be a major piece of work during the heist’s aftermath. This character pushes the story forward; Mr. Blonde’s actions function as the narrative foundation for the climactic showdown.

More: All Of Quentin Tarantino’s Screenplays (Including The Ones He Didn’t Direct), Ranked

Reservoir Dogs’ Final Showdown

Reservoir Dogs establishes each of its characters as calculated and accomplished criminals, but there’s a clear power structure in place. At the top, there’s Joe Cabot, portrayed coldly by the aforementioned Tierney, an actor who made a career by playing mobsters. In contrast, Cabot’s son, Eddie, is portrayed loosely by Penn. If he’s the eyes for the operation, then it’s not hard to see why Mr. Orange aka Freddy Newandyke could infiltrate the system. As the father of a gangster, Eddie seeks validation. Most importantly, he seeks validation from his peers. Interestingly, Eddie’s wardrobe contrasts with the rest of the more authentic gangsters.

In Reservoir Dogs, Mr. White’s sense of humanity contrasts with Mr. Blonde’s aloof behavior. At the warehouse, Mr. White looks after Mr. Orange and screams at Mr. Blonde about his killing rampage during the heist. Then, Mr. Blonde delivers a classic line: “Are you gonna bark all day, little doggy, or are you gonna bite?” Once again, Tarantino reinforces the power dynamics; a character’s manhood is questioned. Ironically, Mr. Blonde’s suit-and-tie persona doesn’t make him a slick character – that’s Mr. Pink, who is staged in the background during this particular scene. Suddenly, he inserts himself into the conversation and talks about being a “professional.” Mr. Pink then uses a racial slur, thus making him even less of a sympathetic figure, this coming after his opening act rant about his refusal to tip waitresses. Just as the Reservoir Dogs’ editing shuffles the narrative, Tarantino’s character dialogue shuffles the power dynamics as well.

Later in Reservoirs Dogs, when Joe shows up to the warehouse, he knows exactly what’s going on. Joe names Mr. Orange as the rat, and Tierney’s character ultimately function as the inciting incident for the climactic Mexican standoff. Joe’s dialogue further heightens the chaos and finger-pointing. Just like Eddie, he keeps everyone on edge rather than calming them like a… “professional.” And so Eddie winds up pointing a gun at Mr. White, who points a gun at Joe, who in turns points a gun at the bleeding Mr. Orange. Meanwhile Mr. Pink cleverly hides and avoids and flying bullets. All of these men speak forcefully and serve as strong male characters, but their poor communications skills and lack of polish lead to their collective downfalls. The shots ring out quickly; Mr. Orange takes a bullet, then Mr. White, then the Cabots.

What Happened To Mr. Pink At The End Of Reservoir Dogs

Reservoir Dogs ends with Mr. Pink’s escape. He survives because of his intellect, and manages to secure the diamonds. Throughout the film, Mr. Pink speaks practically and muses about how people panic under pressure. He understands the game but doesn’t feel inclined to present a specific persona. Even when he complains about being named “Mr. Pink,” he quickly brushes it off and moves forward like a professional, at least in terms of the job itself. In Reservoir Dogs, everything points towards Mr. Pink’s survival; however, he doesn’t quite walk off into the sunset.

After Mr. Pink leaves the warehouse during Reservoir Dogs’ ending, the attention shifts to a moment of truth between Mr. White and Mr. Orange. The camera pans across the building, showing all the dead bodies, all the dead tough guys. Mr. White, who initially shows compassion for Mr. Orange in the heist’s immediate aftermath, once again reveals his humanity and embraces his newfound friend. Mr. Orange admits that he’s an undercover cop, thus completely destroying Mr. White’s psyche. The camera lingers on the two characters until the end, with Mr. White presumably murdering Mr. Orange while being killed in the process by police officers.

Reservoir Dogs’ final, dramatic moments completely shift attention from Mr. Pink’s escape. As the Mr. White/Mr. Orange sequence plays out, the sound design makes it blatantly clear that something dramatic is also happening outside. Mr. Pink can be heard conversing with the police officers, but just barely. But whether he lives or dies is another matter. Tarantino ends Reservoir Dogs with a telling visual featuring Mr. White and Mr. Orange, and masks another sequence about Mr. Pink’s fate through cryptic sound design.

Next: All Of Quentin Tarantino’s Final Scenes, Ranked


2019-07-14 01:07:40

Q.V. Hough

Star Wars 9 Changes KOTOR’s Sith Troopers For New Canon

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is completely changing Knights of the Old Republic‘s Sith troopers for Disney/Lucasfilm’s new Star Wars canon. Although practically all of the Expanded Universe (now Legends) was removed from canon shortly after Disney acquired Lucasfilm way back in 2012, bits and pieces of various comics, novels, and video games have found their way back into canon, especially in some of the recent films. And now, J.J. Abrams’ Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is introducing Sith troopers.

Interestingly, this is the first time that the term Sith will be used in the Star Wars sequel trilogy, aside from an off-hand remark from Maz Kanata in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Bringing the Sith back into the Star Wars saga, along with the return of Palpatine nonetheless, has certainly captured fans’ imaginations. However, while the Sith troopers may be the first of more Sith-related characters to join the fold in The Rise of Skywalker, they are decidedly different from their Legends’ counterparts.

Related: Star Wars Theory: How The JEDI Created The Sith

Sith troopers first appeared in Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, and they were soldiers of the Sith Empire who followed Darth Revan during the Jedi Civil War. Furthermore, there were different classes of Sith troopers, such as Sith commandos and Sith grenadiers, and sometimes, they had different colored armor. But overall, the Sith troopers weren’t elite soldiers but rather bantha fodder for the Jedi and the Republic to kill, similar to the Stormtroopers that fought for the Galactic Empire and later the First Order.

While the Sith troopers from Knights of the Old Republic followed Revan (and Darth Malak) because they believed that the Sith would better rule the galaxy than the failing Jedi and Republic, the Sith troopers in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker are noticeably different, in that they are considered the next evolution of the Imperial and First Order Stormtroopers. Whereas the Sith troopers from the games got their name because they represented the Sith Empire, which was led by two Dark Lords of the Sith, the movie’s Sith troopers are merely taking the Sith name and color.

Sure, the Sith troopers from The Rise of Skywalker are red in color and appear to carry a modified version of the F-11D blaster rifle, they are still Stormtroopers either working for the First Order or simply under Kylo Ren. Even though both versions of Sith troopers fight for the “bad guys” and follow a leader who practices the dark side of the Force, they are different in every other way – from their design and beliefs to their purpose and origin. It seems unlikely that Kylo Ren’s Sith troopers are former members of the Resistance, as Revan’s Sith troopers came from the Republic. All of these changes, however, are being done to represent Lucasfilm’s new version of Star Wars canon, one that fits in line with the First Order’s existence.

Next: How Star Wars: Rise Of Skywalker Can Make Kylo Ren A TRUE Sith


2019-07-14 01:07:07

Mansoor Mithaiwala

Star Wars 9 Changes KOTOR’s Sith Troopers For New Canon

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is completely changing Knights of the Old Republic‘s Sith troopers for Disney/Lucasfilm’s new Star Wars canon. Although practically all of the Expanded Universe (now Legends) was removed from canon shortly after Disney acquired Lucasfilm way back in 2012, bits and pieces of various comics, novels, and video games have found their way back into canon, especially in some of the recent films. And now, J.J. Abrams’ Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is introducing Sith troopers.

Interestingly, this is the first time that the term Sith will be used in the Star Wars sequel trilogy, aside from an off-hand remark from Maz Kanata in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Bringing the Sith back into the Star Wars saga, along with the return of Palpatine nonetheless, has certainly captured fans’ imaginations. However, while the Sith troopers may be the first of more Sith-related characters to join the fold in The Rise of Skywalker, they are decidedly different from their Legends’ counterparts.

Related: Star Wars Theory: How The JEDI Created The Sith

Sith troopers first appeared in Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, and they were soldiers of the Sith Empire who followed Darth Revan during the Jedi Civil War. Furthermore, there were different classes of Sith troopers, such as Sith commandos and Sith grenadiers, and sometimes, they had different colored armor. But overall, the Sith troopers weren’t elite soldiers but rather bantha fodder for the Jedi and the Republic to kill, similar to the Stormtroopers that fought for the Galactic Empire and later the First Order.

While the Sith troopers from Knights of the Old Republic followed Revan (and Darth Malak) because they believed that the Sith would better rule the galaxy than the failing Jedi and Republic, the Sith troopers in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker are noticeably different, in that they are considered the next evolution of the Imperial and First Order Stormtroopers. Whereas the Sith troopers from the games got their name because they represented the Sith Empire, which was led by two Dark Lords of the Sith, the movie’s Sith troopers are merely taking the Sith name and color.

Sure, the Sith troopers from The Rise of Skywalker are red in color and appear to carry a modified version of the F-11D blaster rifle, they are still Stormtroopers either working for the First Order or simply under Kylo Ren. Even though both versions of Sith troopers fight for the “bad guys” and follow a leader who practices the dark side of the Force, they are different in every other way – from their design and beliefs to their purpose and origin. It seems unlikely that Kylo Ren’s Sith troopers are former members of the Resistance, as Revan’s Sith troopers came from the Republic. All of these changes, however, are being done to represent Lucasfilm’s new version of Star Wars canon, one that fits in line with the First Order’s existence.

Next: How Star Wars: Rise Of Skywalker Can Make Kylo Ren A TRUE Sith


2019-07-14 01:07:07

Mansoor Mithaiwala

Ghostbusters 2020: Release Date, Story, Returning Cast & Updates

The Ghostbusters franchise will continue with Ghostbusters 2020, and there’s already so much we know about the film. So far, the movie franchise includes 1984’s Ghostbusters, 1989’s Ghostbusters II, and the 2016 female-led Ghostbusters reboot.

The series kicked off in the early 1980s by following the fictional Ghostbusters team – parapsychologists Dr. Peter Venkman (Bill Murray), Dr. Raymond Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), Dr. Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis), and their friend Winston Zeddemore (Ernie Hudson) – on their various adventures as a ghost removal service. The sci-fi comedy concept was such a hit with audiences that it spawned a sequel and a reboot and has gone on to be the subjects of animated TV shows, comics, toys, apparel, and more. Given how beloved Ghostbusters is, it’s no wonder a new Ghostbusters film is on the way.

Related: The Ghost In The Ghostbusters Logo Has An Actual Name

With production already underway and a release date set, it’s officially time to get excited about the next Ghostbusters film. Here’s everything we know so far, from the cast to the director, to which original cast members will return.

Ghostbusters 2020 has its sights set on becoming a huge summer hit. The forthcoming Ghostbusters film is set for release on July 10, 2020. This means the film will be released at the height of the summer moviegoing season and will be competing against films like Ryan Reynolds’ Free GuyTop Gun: MaverickWonder Woman 1984, and Artemis Fowl. From there, it will come up against films like Christopher Nolan’s TenetJungle Cruise, and Morbius through the rest of the month.

Jason Reitman will direct Ghostbusters 2020Reitman’s career has taken off as a director over the last decade or so. His feature-length film debut was 2005’s Thank You For Smoking, starring Aaron Eckhart. He then moved on to the acclaimed Juno written by Diablo Cody and starring Ellen Page, Up in the Air with George Clooney, Young Adult with Charlize Theron, Labor Day, and most recently, the Hugh Jackman political drama The Front Runner.

Reitman is an established director, but he is also the son of Ivan Reitman. Fans of the first two Ghostbuster films know Ivan directed them. It’s possible Ivan is in an advisory role while Ghostbusters 2020 films because he appeared in an on-set photo with the movie’s stars: Carrie Coon, Finn Wolfhard, and McKenna Grace, posted by Reitman on Twitter.

The Ghostbusters 2020 cast has arguably been the most exciting aspect of the film’s development. When news of Reitman’s Ghostbusters film first broke in early 2019, it was reported it would center around four young teens. Over time, the two young leads became The Haunting of Hill House‘s McKenna Grace and Stranger Things‘ Finn Wolfhard, who will play siblings. The Leftovers actress Carrie Coon will play their mom. Paul Rudd is also starring in Ghostbusters 2020, and he made the announcement with a video of him standing in front of the Ghostbusters HQ in New York. Furthermore, relative newcomers Logan Kim and 20-year-old Celeste O’Connor joined the cast in supporting roles. While details on their characters weren’t revealed, it can be presumed that they’re playing the other two kids.

There have also been a lot of questions regarding whether any of the original Ghostbusters cast (Aykroyd, Murray, Hudson, Weaver, Annie Potts, and Rick Moranis) would make an appearance. Since Ghostbusters 2020 was announced, various cast members have been hinting at their potential involvement. Potts has teased the return of Janine around the time filming began. Weaver also confirmed in early June she, Murray, and Aykroyd would be shooting scenes for the film. It’s unclear how involved the original cast members will be in Ghostbusters 2020, but it may not matter as much. Seeing the original gang back together will undoubtedly be a huge selling point for the film going forward.

While there will certainly be ghosts, comedy, and all manner of hijinks in Ghostbusters 2020, there is currently no clear indication of what the core story will be about. An official Ghostbusters 2020 synopsis has yet to release, but based on the actors involved and the set photos that have appeared online, it seems like it will be a family story set outside of the confines of New York City. Perhaps more concrete details on Ghostbusters 2020‘s story will release once production comes to an end.

Reitman has confirmed Ghostbusters 2020 film is a direct sequel to Ghostbusters II and won’t reference any of the events from the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot. At a Ghostbusters fan event, Reitman said he “wanted to make a love letter to the original movie” with his Ghostbusters film. Because of the likelihood of the original Ghostbusters (with the exception of Ramis, who passed away in 2014) returning in some capacity, the Ghostbusters 2020 might not only be a love letter but a bridging of the generational divide between the senior Ghostbusters team and the Gen Z team. Plus, it will turn the film into a symbolic passing of the torch, too.

There has been some prickliness between the 2016 cast and director Paul Feig and Reitman during the film’s pre-production. Feig and Leslie Jones, in particular, voiced their disappointment with the sequel insofar as it seemed to exclude their film from the Ghostbusters canon. Reitman indirectly responded to the comments, tweeting in February: “I have nothing but admiration for Paul and Leslie and Kate and Melissa and Kristen and the bravery with which they made Ghostbusters 2016. They expanded the universe and made an amazing movie!” Feig has expressed interest in a sequel to the Ghostbusters reboot, but it’s unclear if that will materialize.

Reitman released a teaser trailer in January 2019 featuring iconic Ghostbusters mobile the Ecto-1. In this Ghostbusters 2020 teaser, the camera pans in on something under a tarp in what looks like a barn or warehouse. A wind blows the tarp up to reveal the Ecto-1 and the Ghostbusters logo. The footage was specifically shot for the teaser and most likely won’t be featured in any future trailers or in the film itself. Filming on Ghostbusters 2020 began in June in Calgary. If the film doesn’t experience any production hiccups and follows a traditional timeline, it’s possible the first trailer will arrive in late 2019 or early 2020. This will allow enough time to build excitement for the Ghostbusters 2020‘s summer release and build its marketing campaign for added visibility.

Next: Why Ghostbusters 3 Took 31 Years To Make



2019-07-14 01:07:05

Allie Gemmill

How Legion’s Professor X Compares To X-Men Movie Versions

Legion has finally revealed its version of the iconic mutant Professor X – but how does he compare to his X-Men movie counterparts played by Patrick Stewart and James McAvoy? In Legion, Charles Xavier is the biological father of David Haller, the show’s ultra-powerful mutant protagonist (or antagonist, depending on where we are in the story). For its first two seasons, Xavier was never directly evoked, but hinted at through some familiar imagery, like an empty wheelchair. But for Legion’s final season, the man himself will be making an appearance. Games of Thrones and Doctor Who alum Harry Lloyd appeared as the famous mutant telepath – sporting a full head of hair – in the season’s third episode, a flashback sequence telling the surprisingly sad story of how David’s parents fell in love.

We obviously have only spent one episode with Lloyd’s Xavier, but it’s already easy to see there are some important differences between this version and the movie versions. The biggest difference is the most obvious – this version of Xavier is the father of David Haller. This is not something Legion just conjured up; David Haller was a crucial figure in the X-Men comics in the 90s, serving as a catalyst for the line-wide Age of Apocalypse event. It’s a scenario rich with possibilities, and keeping Xavier off the board until the story’s climax was an inspired choice for Legion. It’s possible the film versions of Xavier could have fathered a child with Gabrielle Haller, but there was never any indication of that. This is an aspect of the character that the films never explored, which is not surprising. Legion is a dark, intimate story that wouldn’t have worked in a two-hour blockbuster, squeezed in between scenes of Wolverine stabbing people and Dark Phoenix scowling.

Related: Legion Introduces Professor X (& Reveals David’s Problems Are His Fault)

This version of Xavier also exists in a different era than the movie versions. While the X-Men films have always played it fast and loose with its own continuity, Stewart and McAvoy are ostensibly portraying the same version of the character, who was seen in X-Men: First Class to be a man in his mid-20s by 1961. In Legion, Xavier fought in World War II at about the same age, two decades earlier than the film version. This Xavier was deeply affected by the horrors he endured during the war, which led him to a post-war psychiatric ward. Xavier didn’t think much of the doctors, but used his time there to help others through their issues with his psychic abilities, including Gabrielle Haller. Charles and Gabrielle would fall in love, and Xavier altered the minds of the psych ward doctors to arrange their early release so they could start their lives together. Unfortunately, that little bit of hubris on Xavier’s part my prove to be his damaged son’s undoing.

Despite the fact he’s the benevolent face of mutantkind, Xavier has never been a morally pure character, which has always held true in the live action adaptations as well. Stewart’s Professor X made some ethically questionable choices regarding Wolverine and Jean Grey, and McAvoy’s Xavier was such a constant, selfish screwup that it was occasionally difficult to understand why anyone would follow the guy. This is definitely the case with Lloyd’s Xavier, who makes quick, self-serving decisions without thinking through the possible consequences. It would seem that cost him his wife, and may end up costing David his life.

There’s still a lot we don’t know about Legion’s version of Charles Xavier. There’s been no hint that the X-Men exist, or that Xavier even started a school for mutants. Also, another surprisingly dark scenario is starting to seem more and more likely. In the comics, Xavier never knew about his son until he was an adult, but it’s starting to seem highly improbable that Xavier didn’t know this version of David. He raised him at least for a little while with Gabrielle before the Shadow King took hold, and we’ve still not seen the exact fallout from that. But most importantly, will we finally get to see David confront the man who abandoned him as an infant, damning him to years of psychic torture? It’s the biggest question Legion has yet to resolve, and the answer is likely coming as the series hurtles toward its conclusion.

Next: Legion Reveals David’s Plan (& It’s More Green Lantern Than X-Men)


2019-07-13 12:07:07

Dusty Stowe

Pulp Fiction In Chronological Order | ScreenRant

Director Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 film Pulp Fiction presents three intertwined stories presented in such a way that it’s key you figure out the chronological order of all the episodes. Pulp Fiction elevated Tarantino’s status as a must-see director, cementing his aesthetic, thematic interests, and the kinds of stories he was interested in telling as a filmmaker.

One of the biggest selling points of Pulp Fiction is its cast, which includes John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Ving Rhames, Tim Roth, Harvey Keitel, Amanda Plummer, and Eric Stoltz. This cast comes together to tell three different stories, so to say, which are all woven together. One storyline follows two hitmen (Jackson and Travolta) whose day starts off normally before quickly descending into chaos; another storyline follows Travolta’s character taking his boss’s wife (Thurman) out for a little fun and things quickly going sideways when she overdoses; the final storyline follows a boxer (Willis) who has to go on the lam and, in a twisted turn of events, finds himself fighting his way out of the basement of a pawnshop owner. Things get very strange and very intense easily and quickly in Pulp Fiction, making it all the more compelling to watch.

RELATED: 10 Things Everyone Gets Wrong About Pulp Fiction

One of the most notable parts of Pulp Fiction is the fact that it’s not a linear story. Over the course of the film’s runtime, it becomes clear this story is cutting from one time of day to another and it’s tough to tell just how much time is passing between events, or “episodes.” Figuring out Pulp Fiction‘s chronology benefits the story, especially because it adds some more stakes and context to what’s going on. What follows is the chronological order of events from Pulp Fiction, a film which takes place over the course of two days.

Captain Koons’ (Walken) time may be brief in Pulp Fiction, but he certainly knows how to make a lasting impression. As the film transitions from one protagonist, Vincent (Travolta), to the next, Butch (Willis), viewers are first shown a flashback scene. The story briefly goes back to the mid-’70s and we see a young Butch sitting in front of the TV. His mother enters with Koons, introduces Koons as a man who knew Butch’s father when they were both in a Vietnam War POW camp, and lets Koons take over. Koons proceeds to tells Butch a long story about a gold watch Butch’s father wants Koons to get to his son because he was going to die in the prisoner camp.

As Koons tells the story Butch’s father ostensibly told him about the gold watch’s journey from its purchase in the early 20th century and through the generations, it seems like such an inspiring tale; the Coolidge men have done whatever necessary to make sure their son gets the watch. Koons’ story takes a turn for the surprisingly disturbing when he reveals how Butch’s dad kept the gold watch safe in the POW camp so his son could have it: by storing it in a body cavity that was definitely not his mouth.

The Pulp Fiction timeline jumps back into the main events with the chronologically first episode where Vincent and Jules (Jackson), two L.A. hitmen who work for Marcellus Wallace (Rhames) are shown on the job. It’s unclear where Vincent and Jules are headed but Vincent spends some time telling Jules about his recent trip to Europe, complete with the French version of a Quarter Pounder – a “Royale with cheese” – and the bars in Amsterdam.

By the time the story is finished, Jules and Vincent are heading up to Brett’s (Frank Whaley), an associate of Marcellus’, apartment. The men proceed to shake Brett down for something he owes to Marcellus. The conversation ends with Jules and Vincent shooting Brett as well as two of his friends and taking Brett’s friend Marvin (Phil LaMarr) as a hostage to answer to Marcellus for Brett. They take the mysterious briefcase and head towards Marcellus’ house with Marvin, but things go from bad to worse when Vincent accidentally shoots Marvin in the face, making a makes a big mess inside the car.

Jules and Vincent immediately head over to Jimmy’s (Tarantino) house in Toluca Lake. The hitmen know they need to get the car cleaned up and themselves cleaned up as well. It will be an incredible undertaking and only one man knows the right steps to fix it: The Wolf (Keitel). The Wolf, an old-school pro who’s been in more than one of these kinds of situations in his time, arrives at Jimmy’s house. Over a cup of coffee, he coolly tells Jules and Vincent every excruciatingly minute detail they have to take in order to clean the inside of the car, dispose of the body, and get themselves cleaned up before they can go back to work. The episode ends with Jules and Vincent out of their sleek suits and now dressed in colorful shorts and T-shirts, which they’ll be seen in a few more times in other episodes later in the day.

The story moves from Toluca Lake to the Hawthorne Grill diner, the scene that actually opens the movie, shortly after Jules and Vincent’s encounter with The Wolf in the morning. A young couple, Pumpkin (Roth) and Honey Bunny (Plummer), sit in a booth. They discuss the merits of robbing all of the people currently in the diner as well as the diner itself. They calmly come to the agreement that they’re going to go through with the robbery. At that moment, Pumpkin hops up on to the table while Honey Bunny stands on the ground and both point their guns at the diner patrons. Pumpkin calmly explains what’s going on and that he and Honey Bunny will be collecting everyone’s money and valuables.

It’s revealed Jules and Vincent have also gone right to the Hawthorne Grill for lunch after their debacle earlier that day. The men eat in their newly-acquired outfits and chat about why Jules doesn’t eat bacon as well as what just happened to them. Vincent gets up to go to the bathroom, leaving Jules all alone when Pumpkin and Honey Bunny hold up the diner. Pumpkin makes his way to Jules, demanding whatever is in the briefcase. Jules tells him that’s a bad idea because it’s the property of Marcellus and robbing Marcellus is a very bad idea. Jules instead offers Pumpkin all of the money in his wallet. At this same time, Vince exits the bathroom, sees what’s going on, and holds up Honey Bunny as insurance against Pumpkin doing anything to Jules. Jules convinces Pumpkin to take the money and leave with his girlfriend.

Once they’re gone, Vincent reminds Jules they have to go see Marcellus, so they put their guns in their shorts, take the briefcase, and leave. The last time we see them together, it’s that same afternoon as they meet up with Marcellus, who is having a conversation with Butch about throwing a boxing match later that night because it will benefit Marcellus and Butch. Vincent encourages Butch to really consider what Marcellus is offering.

The present-day part of the “Gold Watch” prelude cuts to the evening of the same day as Jules and Vincent’s mishap with Marvin, Honey Bunny and Pumpkin holding up the Hawthorne Grill, and Vincent talking with Butch about throwing the boxing match. Butch wakes up from dreaming about this memory of Koons giving him the gold watch. It seems Butch is having downtime in between rounds so, as the prelude ends, Butch is shown leaving the room and preparing to finish the fight.

That night, Vincent shows up at Marcellus’ house to take Marcellus’ wife, Mia (Thurman), out for a night on the town. It’s not romantic, but more of a favor Vincent is completing at Marcellus’ request. Vincent picks Mia up but before they go, Mia has a few bumps of cocaine to get the night started. Vincent drives Mia to a ’50s-themed restaurant, Jack Rabbit Slim’s, where all of the employees are dressed like famous celebrities from the 1950s. Over the course of their conversation during dinner, Mia tells Vincent about her short-lived career as an actress. At one point, Mia gets up, goes to the bathroom, and does another line of cocaine. She comes back to the table and she eats. About halfway through dinner, one restaurant employee announces there’s a dance contest starting, which Mia encourages Vincent to participate in with her. The pair get up on a stage on the center of the restaurant and start dancing to Chuck Berry’s “You Never Can Tell.”

The couple leaves the restaurant and goes home. They make it back to Marcellus and Mia’s house, and while Vincent is in the bathroom, Mia discovers his heroin and, mistaking it for more cocaine, does a line and overdoses. Vincent panics, thinking he’s about to watch his boss’s wife die. He rushes her to the home of his drug dealer, Lance (Eric Stoltz), to see if he can help. Lance figures out the only way to revive Mia is to take a large needle filled with adrenaline and plunge it into Mia’s heart. Vincent does the honors and successfully wakes Mia up. He takes Mia, in new clothes and looking a lot worse for the wear, back to her house and then leaves.

The “Gold Watch” episode begins right after the boxing match, which we now know is happening at the same time Mia and Vincent are at Jack Rabbit Slims. Butch leaves the match, having won and somehow knocked out his opponent (the one Marcellus wanted Butch to purposely lose to) to the point he killed him. Butch makes it back to his apartment but knows he and his girlfriend, Fabienne (Maria de Medeiros), can’t stay there. Butch manages to get her to come with him to a motel where they hide out for the night.

The next morning, Butch realizes he left his father’s gold watch at his apartment. Butch leaves Fabienne at the motel and returns to the apartment to retrieve it. Upon entering, he suspects someone else is in there. He grabs the watch and sees Vincent, sent there by Marcellus to kill him. Butch shoots and kills Vincent, then leaves the apartment. As Butch is driving back to the motel, he happens to see Marcellus crossing the street. Butch tries to run him over and the two men get into a fight and end up in a pawnshop. Things get extremely unsettling very quickly as the pawnshop owner and his friend, a security guard named Zed, take them hostage in the pawnshop owner’s basement where Butch, with the help of Zed, rapes Marcellus. Butch puts aside his differences with Marcellus and rescues him. Butch agrees to leave town and never speak of the incident, leaving Marcellus behind to brutalize his captors. Butch takes Zed’s motorcycle (actually a chopper) and goes back to the motel and drives off with Fabienne.

NEXT: All Of Quentin Tarantino’s Screenplays (Including The Ones He Didn’t Direct), Ranked


2019-07-13 11:07:37

Allie Gemmill

Comic-Con 2019 Schedule: Best Movie/TV Panels (& What Will Be Revealed)

San Diego Comic-Con 2019 is right around the corner, and the convention’s schedule is packed with panels for some of the biggest TV shows and movies. From The Walking Dead to the first look at what’s coming next from Marvel Studios, it’s shaping up to be a very busy weekend, so we’ve put together a guide to the best panels, when they’re taking place, and what reveals to expect. This year Comic-Con kicks off on Wednesday, July 17th and concludes on Sunday, July 21st.

While SDCC is first and foremost a hub for all things comic book-related, this year there won’t be a Warner Bros. panel in Hall H – which means no previews for upcoming DC movies like Joker or Wonder Woman 1984. Disney has its own fan convention, D23 Expo, which is taking place in August, so the studio will be holding back some trailers and previews until then. For example, there won’t be a Star Wars panel in Hall H this year, so don’t expect any big reveals related to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker or upcoming Disney+ series The Mandalorian. In addition to Warner Bros., Sony and Universal are also skipping Hall H this year, which means no reveals for Venom 2, Morbius, or Jurassic World 3.

Related: Why Marvel Studios Skipped Comic-Con in 2018

That’s what you won’t see – so what about what you will see? Marvel has a big presence at Comic-Con 2019, with Marvel Games and Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD panels in Hall H on Thursday, Writing Avengers: Endgame and A Conversation With the Russo Brothers on Friday, and the big Marvel Studios panel on Saturday, where we’re expecting to see some of what’s coming up in the Marvel Cinematic Universe Phase Four. HBO is also making a big push, with panels for Westworld season 3, His Dark Materials, and Game of Thrones. Meanwhile, horror fans can look forward to some footage from IT Chapter Two at ScareDiego and a new look at Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.

No matter where your pop culture tastes lie, there’ll be something to look forward to at SDCC 2019 – whether you’re attending the convention or just following along with the biggest reveals online. Here’s a schedule for the biggest panels, which guests will be in attendance, and what we can expect to see.

Thursday 18th July – 11am PDT/2pm EDT/7pm BST

Paramount Pictures’ big Hall H presentation at SDCC 2019 is Terminator: Dark Fate, the sixth installment in the long-running sci-fi action franchise. Series mainstay Arnold Schwarzenegger will be a guest on the Terminator: Dark Fate panel, alongside Linda Hamilton, Mackenzie Davis, Natalia Reyes, Gabriel Luna, and director Tim Miller. Expect a new trailer at the very least, along with some behind the scenes reveals.

Thursday 18th July – 1:30pm PDT/4:30pm EDT/9:30pm BST

Moderated by Greg Miller, the Marvel Games panel will feature Marvel Games VP and executive director Bill Roseman along with other panelists from Marvel Games. Expect to see trailers and gameplay footage from upcoming titles Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order, Marvel’s Iron Man VR, and Marvel’s Avengers.

Thursday 18th July – 3:30pm PDT/6:30pm EDT/11:3opm BST

Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD is getting its first ever Hall H panel this year, with stars Clark Gregg, Ming-Na Wen, Chloe Bennet, Elizabeth Henstridge, Iain De Caestecker, Henry Simmons, Natalia Cordova-Buckley, and Jeff Ward in attendance. They’ll be joined by executive producers Maurissa Tancharoen, Jed Whedon, Jeff Bell, and Jeph Loeb. Expect a sneak peek of what’s to come in the upcoming season 6 finale, as well as some teases for what lies ahead in season 7.

Thursday 18th July – 4:45pm PDT/7:45pm EDT/12:45am BST

HBO’s first big Hall H panel of the weekend is His Dark Materials, offering a look at what’s to come in the upcoming TV adaptation of Philip Pullman’s fantasy trilogy. Cast members Dafne Keen, James McAvoy, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and Ruth Wilson will be in attendance, and we can probably look forward to seeing a new trailer for the series, which will premiere later this year. The panel will be followed by a Q&A session.

Friday 19th July – 10:00am PDT/1:00pm EDT/6:00pm BST

Go back to the very start of Avengers: Endgame with screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, as they chat to Backstory editor-in-chief Jeff Goldsmith about the challenge of writing two epic superhero movies back-to-back. Though the panel’s name only mentions Avengers: Endgame, we can naturally expect extensive discussion of Avengers: Infinity War as well. We may get to see some more behind-the-scenes footage and concept art, and learn about alternative endings or deleted scenes.

Friday 19th July – 11:00am PDT/2:00pm EDT/7pm BST

A discussion about the process of writing Avengers 3 and 4 will be immediately followed by a panel that digs into the enormous undertaking of filming the two movies. Directors Anthony and Joe Russo will talk about their journey with Marvel Studios and what lies ahead for their new production company AGBO. The directors teased on Twitter that they will be showing some kind of footage, but we don’t know exactly what it will be.

Friday 19th July – 12:00pm PDT/3:00pm EDT/8:00pm BST

The final day of Comic-Con will coincide with Fear the Walking Dead‘s season 5 mid-season finale, though the show will only be on break for a few weeks before returning in August. Fans can probably expect to see either a teaser for the mid-season finale or a preview of what’s to come in the second half of the season during SDCC’s Fear the Walking Dead Hall H panel. In attendance are cast members Lennie James, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Maggie Grace, Colman Domingo, Danay Garcia, Austin Amelio, Alexa Nisenson, Karen David, Jenna Elfman, and Rubén Blades. They’ll be joined by Walking Dead chief content officer Scott M. Gimple, as well as executive producers Andrew Chambliss, Ian Goldberg, Robert Kirkman, Gale Ann Hurd, Dave Alpert, and Greg Nicotero, and co-executive producer Michael Satrazemis. The panel will be moderated by Talking Dead host Chris Hardwick.

Friday 19th July – 1:00pm PDT/4:00pm EDT/7:00pm BST

Immediately following the Fear the Walking Dead panel in Hall H is parent show The Walking Dead. There will be a first-look trailer for The Walking Dead season 10, and the cast and producers will discuss the process of filming the upcoming season. In attendance is Walking Dead chief content officer Scott M. Gimple, as well as executive producers Robert Kirkman, Gale Ann Hurd, Dave Alpert, and Greg Nicotero, as well as cast members Norman Reedus, Danai Gurira, Melissa McBride, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Avi Nash, Cooper Andrews, Ryan Hurst, Nadia Hilker, Eleanor Matsuura, and Cailey Fleming.

Friday 19th July – 2:15pm PDT/5:15pm EDT/10:15pm BST

Netflix’s new fantasy series The Witcher, based on the books by Andrzej Sapkowski and the video games by CD Projekt RED, is getting a big Hall H showcase at SDCC 2019. No guests have yet been confirmed for this panel, but we can probably expect to see star Henry Cavill and showrunner Lauren S. Hissrich, as well as supporting cast members. There hasn’t yet been a trailer released for The Witcher, so the first footage will almost certainly be making its debut at Comic-Con.

Friday 19th July – 3:30pm PDT/6:30pm EDT/11:30pm BST

A panel for Amazon’s new series The Boys, based on the comic series by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson, is taking place in Ballroom 20, with cast members Karl Urban, Jack Quaid, Antony Starr, Erin Moriarty, Laz Alonso, Chace Crawford, Tomer Capon, and Karen Fukuhara in attendance. They’ll be joined by executive producers Eric Kripke, Seth Rogen, Jessie T. Usher, and Elisabeth Shue, and the panel will be moderated by Aisha Tyler. The series is set to premiere the week after Comic-Con 2019, on July 26, so we may well get to see a final trailer and possibly early confirmation of a season 2 renewal.

Friday 19th July – 5:30pm PDT/8:30pm EDT/1:30am BST

Game of Thrones may be over, but it’s doing a “victory lap” at SDCC 2019, with a Hall H panel and Q&A session. Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss aren’t yet confirmed to be in attendance, but fans can expect to see cast members Jacob Anderson, John Bradley, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Liam Cunningham, Nathalie Emmanuel, Iain Glen, Conleth Hill, Maisie Williams, and Isaac Hempstead Wright. Miguel Sapochnik, who directed several episodes including “Battle of the Bastards” and “The Bells,” will also be in attendance. It’s possible that HBO may use this as an opportunity to reveal a glimpse what’s coming next in the Game of Thrones prequel series, which began filming last month.

Saturday 20th July – 11:30am PDT/2:30pm EDT/7:30pm BST

Big things are happening in the Star Trek universe, and you can find out all about them in Hall H’s Enter the Star Trek Universe Panel. This 90-minute presentation will cover the upcoming third season of Star Trek: Discovery, as well as the highly-anticipated Star Trek: Picard and new animated series Star Trek: Lower Decks. Discovery star Sonequa Martin-Green will be in attendance alongside executive producers Alex Kurtzman, Michelle Paradise, and Heather Kadin, and Martin-Green’s co-star Tig Notaro will moderate the panel. Star Trek: Lower Decks‘ panel will feature co-creator Mike McMahan and other guests, and will offer a first look at the upcoming series.

Finally, Star Trek: Picard‘s panel will include the legendary Sir Patrick Stewart, alongside co-stars Alison Pill, Michelle Hurd, Evan Evagora, Isa Briones, Santiago Cabrera, and Harry Treadaway. Executive producers Kurtzman and Kadin will also be on this panel, along with Michael Chabon and Akiva Goldsman. We’ve already seen a short teaser trailer for Star Trek: Picard, but hopefully this panel will be accompanied by the release of a full trailer.

Saturday 20th July – 1:15pm PDT/4:15pm EDT/9:15pm BST

HBO’s cerebral sci-fi series Westworld is set to return for season 3 in 2020, and fans can get an early look at the next chapter of the story during Comic-Con’s Westworld III panel in Hall H. In attendance are cast members Thandie Newton, Aaron Paul, Tessa Thompson, Evan Rachel Wood, and Jeffrey Wright, along with showrunners Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy. The first full-length trailer for Westworld season 3 made its debut alongside the season finale of Game of Thrones, and focused mainly on Paul’s character, so expect to see more of Dolores’ journey in the Comic-Con trailer.

  • Batwoman – Saturday 20th July – 10:30am PDT/1:30pm EDT/6:30pm BST
  • Arrow – Saturday 20th July – 3:30pm PDT/6:30pm EDT/11:30pm BST
  • Supergirl – Saturday 20th July – 4:15pm PDT/7:15pm EDT/12:15aam BST
  • Black Lightning – Saturday 20th July – 5:00pm PDT/8:00pm EDT/1:00am BST
  • The Flash – Saturday 20th July – 5:45pm PDT/8:45pm EDT/1:45am BST

The CW’s superheroes are dominating SDCC 2019’s Saturday in Ballroom 20, with five panels that include four of the Arrowverse shows and solo series Black Lightning. The Batwoman presentation in the morning will include a screening of the pilot episode and a Q&A session regarding the newest of the Arrowverse series, and we can expect first-look trailers for the other shows’ upcoming seasons ahead of their return in the fall. Notably absent from the lineup is Legends of Tomorrow, which is also returning this fall for season 5.

Saturday 20th July – 4:00pm PDT/7:00pm EDT/12:00am BST

The lengthily-titled Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark: A Master Class with Guillermo del Toro, The Making of a Monster Panel will take place in the Horton Grand Theatre. As the name suggests, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark producer Guillermo del Toro will be in attendance, along with director André Øvredal. The panel will reveal a new monster that will be featured in the upcoming movie, which is based on the book of the same name by Alvin Schwartz. It seems likely that attendees will get to see exclusive footage of a scene from Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark featuring this new monster.

Saturday 20th July – 5:15pm PDT/8:15pm EDT/1:15am BST

Easily the biggest and most-exciting panel of the Comic-Con weekend, this 90-minute Marvel Studios presentation will offer a first look at what’s to come in Phase Four of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The official program offers very little information, saying only that Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige will be on the panel along with “surprise panelists.” Black Widow has been filming for some time now and is assumed to be the first of Marvel’s 2020 releases, so we may well get a trailer for that movie. There’s a good chance that Marvel will also unveil the full upcoming slate of Phase Four movies, as they did for Phase Three all the way back in 2014. We have some idea of what’s coming next in the MCU, but be ready for some surprises during this panel.

Saturday 20th July – 7:00pm PDT/10:00pm EDT/3:00am BST

DC’s streaming entertainment platform DC Universe has a two-hour presentation dedicated to its original series, which will offer trailers and footage from Titans, Doom Patrol, Young Justice: Outsiders, and a first look at upcoming animated series Harley Quinn. “Select producers and stars” will be in attendance, and its possible that there will be surprise announcements of other upcoming projects for DC Universe.

The incredibly long-lived fantasy horror series Supernatural is finally coming to a close with season 15, and it’s getting ready to go out in style at Comic-Con 2019. In attendance are series stars Jared Padalecki, Jensen Ackles, Misha Collins, and Alexander Calvert, as well as executive producers Robert Singer, Andrew Dabb, Eugenie Ross-Leming, Brad Buckner, and Robert Berens. The Hall H panel promises a special video presentation, which will most likely be a trailer for Supernatural season 15.

More: Comic-Con 2019: All The Movie & TV Trailers To Expect



2019-07-13 10:07:43

Hannah Shaw-Williams