Posts

22 July Review: Paul Greengrass Delivers Another Intense Docudrama

Despite some general storytelling issues, Greengrass succeeds in delivering another well-crafted and intelligent docudrama-thriller with 22 July.

In-between his efforts on the Bourne movies, journalist-turned filmmaker Paul Greengrass has spent much of his career making docudrama-thrillers about real-world events, ranging from the September 11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. (United 93) to the hijacking of the Maersk Alabama in 2009 (Captain Phillips). While there’s an inherent risk of exploiting a real-world tragedy that comes with any such project, Greengrass has long been celebrated for his ability to dramatize terrible events on the big screen in a manner that’s intense, yet sensitive and ultimately insightful in its presentation. Thankfully, that remains the case with his Netflix Original 22 July, even if it doesn’t necessarily represent the writer/director at his finest. Despite some general storytelling issues, Greengrass succeeds in delivering another well-crafted and intelligent docudrama-thriller with 22 July.

22 July picks up on July 21, 2011 in Oslo, Norway, as Anders Behring Breivik (Anders Danielsen Lie) – a self-declared right wing extremist – prepares to carry out a terrorist attack on the city the next day. He begins his assault by setting off a bomb in a van near the main office of the then-current Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg (Ola G. Furuseth), killing eight people in the process. Breivik then proceeds to continue his attack by gunning down 69 members of a summer camp organized by the AUF – the youth division of the Norwegian Labour Party – on the island of Utøya, before he is ultimately apprehended by the police and taken into custody.

Among the members of the summer camp is one Viljar Hanssen (Jonas Strand Gravli), who manages to survive Breivik’s attack despite being shot multiple times and left permanently maimed. As Viljar struggles to recover both physically and psychologically from what happened to him (along with everyone else who survived the Utøya shootings and their loved ones), Breivik works with his chosen lawyer Geir Lippestad (Jon Øigarden) to mount a defense and use his trial as a platform to publicly announce his political agenda (which calls for the immediate deportation of all Muslims and heavier restrictions on immigration to Norway, among other things). When it becomes clear to Viljar what Breivik intends to do, he grows increasingly determined to continue his rehabilitation and testify against him in court for not only himself, but also every other person whose lives were affected by what took place on July 22.

Adapted from the book One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway — and Its Aftermath by Åsne Seierstad, Greengrass’ script for 22 July has a very clear-cut three act structure – with the first act focused on the July 22 attack, the second part set during its immediate aftermath, and the final third centered on Breivik’s trial. The film is strongest during its first and third acts in particular, as those chapters (respectively) play to Greengrass’ strengths as a suspense-thriller storyteller and provide the emotional payoff to Viljar and, thus, Norway’s overarching journey of recovery and survival. It’s the second act where things start to drag and get a little muddled, especially as 22 July splits its focus between not only Viljar’s story thread, but also Lippestad and Breivik’s trial preparation, and the investigation into Stoltenberg’s administration and its failure to prevent a terrorist attack. While there’s nothing in the second act that feels inessential, 22 July struggles to divide its attention evenly between its three plotlines and the film’s pacing suffers for it.

On the whole, however, 22 July does a nice job covering a fair amount of narrative ground, even when taking its pretty substantial runtime into consideration. It helps that Greengrass (as he’s known now for doing, as a director) never fully lifts his foot off the gas pedal and keeps the film’s proceedings feeling on-edge throughout, even during its more purely dramatic portions. The filmmaker, working this time around with DP Pål Ulvik Rokseth (The Snowman) and Oscar-winning Argo editor William Goldenberg, uses essentially the same vérité cinematography and restless editing style that he has on his previous movies, in order to fully immerse viewers in the film’s setting and action. At the same time, Greengrass slows things down a bit here and, in turn, delivers a movie that’s more visually cohesive than some of his weaker efforts in the past (see the last Bourne sequel, in particular). This serves 22 July well, allowing it to effectively work as both a grounded drama and thriller.

Given the sheer amount of information that 22 July strives to cover, though, there’s not a lot of room for the film’s actors to really shine – not in the way that Barkhad Abdi and Tom Hanks did in Captain Phillips, for example. Even so, the 22 July cast is uniformly strong across the board, with Gravli especially doing an excellent job of portraying Viljar’s struggles with his physical injuries, PTSD, and the sheer amount of emotional baggage that he’s saddled with after barely managing to escape the attack on Utøya with his own life. Actors like Thorbjørn Harr and Isak Bakli Aglen are similarly moving in their smaller roles as members of Viljar’s family, as is Seda Witt as Lara Rashid, a young woman who starts to make a romantic connection with Viljar before both of their lives are shattered by Breivik’s attack. As for Breivik himself: Lie is quite compelling in the role and portrays the terrorist as a fully-developed person – one whose rationalization of his behavior makes him chilling and pathetic in equal measure.

As with his previous films, Greengrass uses 22 July as a means for delivering larger sociopolitical commentary about the state of things in the world, specifically where it concerns the rise of xenophobic and nationalist ideologies in various countries (the U.S. included). While his scripted dialogue can start to become a bit on the nose as its strives to get these points across (especially in the third act), Greengrass largely succeeds in allowing the story here to shine a light on these issues organically, without getting up on his figurative soapbox to drive the point home. If there’s a downside to the filmmaker’s approach, though, it’s that July 22 winds up handling its subject matter in a way that’s more engaging intellectually than emotionally and, thus, lacks the emotional resonance of Greengrass’ best work to date.

All things considered, however, Greengrass does a very good job of bringing the true story behind 22 July to cinematic life. The final result is a film that makes for an enlightening and otherwise respectful documentation of a horrifying real-world event, rather than one that comes off as exploitative or manipulative. 22 July is showing in select theaters now – in order to qualify for next year’s major film awards shows – and it certainly benefits from being seen on the big screen, but can still be appreciated just as much as a Netflix Original on your home TV. While it’s obviously not a light-hearted viewing experience, 22 July is very much worth checking out if you’ve enjoyed Greengrass’ previous non-Bourne efforts and/or would like to know more about Norway’s own infamous modern terrorist attack.

TRAILER

22 July is now available for streaming on Netflix and is playing in select U.S. theaters. It is 143 minutes long and is rated R for disturbing violence, graphic images, and language.

Let us know what you thought of the film in the comments section!



Source link
2018-10-10 01:10:22 – Sandy Schaefer

The Flash Confirms [SPOILER] Still Happens In Barry’s Future

Warning! SPOILERS for The Flash season 5 premiere ahead!

The Flash season 5 premiere just revealed the full impact of the Crisis of 2024 – the future event from which comes the newspaper headline, “Flash Missing, Vanishes in Crisis” – and it’s not good.

As far back as season 1, we’ve known thanks to the future edition of The Central City Citizen stored in Gideon’s archive that come April 25th, 2024, The Flash would disappear. Some details have changed with the various timeline shake-ups, but that fact remains the same – during a battle with the Reverse-Flash, Barry disappears. We also know that when they disappear they actually travel back to March 18th, 2000, where the Reverse-Flash attempts to kill a young Barry but instead kills his mother. The Reverse-Flash then tries returning to his own time but can’t because he’s been disconnected from the Speed Force, and what follows leads to season 1 of the show.

Related: The Flash Fixes Plot Hole By Secretly Changing Arrowverse History

As for The Flash, it’s been assumed that after saving his past self, but not his mother, Barry returns to 2024 to face whatever new timeline awaits him. But as we learn in tonight’s season 5 premiere, that isn’t at all what happens. Nora, Barry’s daughter from the future, shares with 2018’s Barry a newspaper headline dated April 25th, 2049 which reads: “25 Years Later – Flash Still Missing.” So The Flash did not return home after chasing the Reverse-Flash to 2000, and by the time Nora travels to the past to spy on her parents, he has yet to return.

Nora’s behavior makes a lot of sense now that we know her father has been missing since she was a toddler. All throughout the premiere, she’s spouting off factoids she learned by studying every single one of his adventures, and when it comes time for their first attempt at sending her back to the future, she hugs Barry like she’s never going to see him again. Nora has clearly grown up not knowing her father so she’s spent a lot of time trying to learn everything she can about him. It’s why she travels back in time – to see her dad in action as The Flash. Of course, with traveling back in time comes the risk of changing the future – something Nora may have already done.

But the more distressing news is what happens to The Flash of the future? Why after following the Reverse-Flash to the year 2000 did he not return for at least another 25 years? The Flash season 5 is absolutely going to explore this, possibly even flashing-forward to that future date and showing what really went on – which, according to Iris’ original article, should see The Flash teaming up with Green Arrow, The Atom, and Hawkgirl to fight the Reverse-Flash as well as the ominous red skies and the immense destruction of Central City.

What The Flash season 5 may also do is explore how it is the future Flash comes back. We know that he must return because in 2056, a future Barry sends a message to Rip Hunter in 2016 warning him of Savitar. So he isn’t gone forever, just a lot longer than we initially thought. Nora’s newspaper has Barry gone for 25 years, and that isn’t exact but it’s very close to how long Barry is gone in the comics after Crisis on Infinite Earths – possibly DC Comics’ most famous storyline and in where The Flash sacrifices himself to save the world. He returns 23 years later in Final Crisis, revealing he had been stuck in the Speed Force. The CW’s The Flash has already done the whole ‘stuck in the Speed Force’ thing, so hopefully it won’t repeat itself, but it does appear as if they are preparing for The Flash of the future to finally make his return after being gone for a quarter-century.

Next: The Flash Season 5: New Cast & Character Guide

The Flash season 5 continues next Tuesday with ‘Blocked’ at 8pm/7c on The CW.



Source link
2018-10-09 07:10:13 – Sarah Moran

10 Best Disney Movies According to Rotten Tomatoes (And 10 With Almost 0%)

After all these years, Disney movies remain the gold standard in family entertainment. Starting from the back of a realty office in Hollywood back in 1928, Disney is now a brand worth billions of dollars. But it’s not just money—Disney’s cultural influence is worldwide and manages to stay relevant with each subsequent generation. There’s no underestimating the power of nostalgia; chances are if someone grew up liking Disney movies, they’re probably a fan for life. Walt Disney pioneered the idea of feature-length animated movies, an idea considered ridiculous at the time. They would be too expensive to make, and what self-respecting adult would pay money to see a full-length animated film? Turns out everyone wanted to, especially those with kids. At the time, there was no such thing as a full-production studio dedicated to animated films—so with the profits of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Walt Disney built one. From there, it was only a short period of time before Disney branched out into producing live-action films, and before anyone knew it, Disney dominated the family entertainment market.

Since then, Disney has expanded its intellectual properties to include Marvel, Star Wars, ABC, and 20th Century Fox. This makes Disney virtually unstoppable. Some meme artists have even depicted Mickey Mouse as Thanos, with its individual properties the different gems in the Infinity Gauntlet. But there were a few hiccups along the way. Disney has had tremendous success with its films, but people tend to forget that even the mighty occasionally fall. Here are the 10 best Disney movies according to the ratings on Rotten Tomatoes, along with the 10 worst.

20 Best: Pinnochio (100%)

Pinnochio was Walt Disney’s second animated feature, released shortly after the success of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. Like its predecessor, it had gorgeous visuals with a painstaking attention to every element of the production. Unlike Snow White, it initially flopped at the box office. Luckily, Walt Disney had faith in the movie and gave it a second release to recover production costs. The plan worked, and Pinocchio eventually earned enough money to put it back into the black.

The iconic “When You Wish Upon A Star” theme from the film is still synonymous with the Disney brand.

The artists of Pinnochio helped pioneered advances in effects animation, which specialized on non-character elements that move, such as water or fire. The animated ocean effects during the Monstro sequence were the most ambitious water effects ever achieved for its time.

19 Worst: That Darn Cat (13%)

If nobody remembers this movie, it’s partially because it came in and of the theatre pretty fast. A remake of Disney’s moderately successful live-action That Darn Cat from 1965, the 1997 version was not nearly as successful. Starring Cristina Ricci as Patti, the plot features a cat that becomes “witness” to a kidnapping gone wrong. Patti eventually convinces the authorities to investigate and she becomes central in helping to solve the details of the crime and eventual rescue.

The reviews of the film were dismal. One critic described it as “…a desperate dip into utter conventionality: dull car chases, explosions, inept slapstick.” Another says it is a “…disappointing, rather warmed over Disney offering.” Despite this, Cristina Ricci was nominated for two awards for her performance in the film, a Kid’s Choice Awards, and a Young Artist’s Ward.

18 Best: Mary Poppins (100%)

The mostly live-action Mary Poppins was a smash-hit. It earned 13 Academy Award film nominations and won five, including Best Actress, Best Original Score, and Best Visual Effects. It’s easy to see why. Julie Andrews brought her amazing charisma to the performance, dazzling audiences with her ability to sing, dance, and easily handle comedy intended for children. The songs are memorable, with several such as A Spoonful of Sugar and Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious becoming part of the American culture.

Disney had experimented with combining live action with animation before, but never in such an ambitious way. For many, their favorite part of the film is where Mary Poppins, Burt the Chimney Sweep, and the Banks children jump into the chalk drawing and have a little adventure in an animated world. Disney is releasing the sequel, Mary Poppins Returns, in December of 2018.

17 Worst: My Favorite Martian (12%)

Based on the 1960’s television show of the same name, My Favorite Martian tells the story of a humanoid Martian (Christopher Lloyd) that crash lands on earth. He enlists the help of a reporter in a funk to put him up while he tries to repair his spaceship and get home.

Though reviews were generally kind to Christopher Lloyd, the movie as a whole was mostly disliked by critics.

Said one reviewer on Rotten Tomatoes, “An utterly pointless and unimaginative remake based on the classic ’60s sitcom…a meteoric misfire.” Another gets right to the point: “A terrible movie. Beware.” My Favorite Martian did earn three nominations…of The Stinkers Bad Movie Awards. It was nominated for Worst Resurrection of a TV Show, Most Botched Comic Relief and Most Painfully Unfunny Comedy.

16 Best: The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (100%)

Like most Disney movies, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was adapted from existing source material. It’s based on characters from short stories from the author A. A. Milne. The film focuses on young Christopher Robin and his stuffed bear, and a menagerie of other stuffed animals come to life. The movie is a collection of animated shorts edited together into a feature-length film.

Surprisingly, the Winnie the Pooh franchise is worth much more than one might imagine. Variety estimated the sales of merchandise related to Winnie the Pooh topped over $5 billion, which among Disney properties, is second only to Mickey Mouse. Disney released a live action movie, Christopher Robin, based on an adult Christopher Robin rediscovering Winnie the Pooh and his friends in August of 2018.

15 Worst: Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (11%)

One would think that after one of the most stereotypical happy endings of all time, writers would have a hard time coming up with a good sequel for Cinderella. One would be right. Cinderella II: Dreams Come True is actually an anthology movie that ties together three Cinderella short stories into one film. The first story describes her struggle to be herself as a new princess. The second follows Jaq the mouse feeling left out. And the third shows how Cinderella tries to teach one of her step-sisters how to smile. Seriously.

This direct-to-video sequel wasn’t liked by critics. One top critic says simply, “Do not see this film.” Another, quite dramatically, announces, “A screaming black vortex of total, irredeemable awfulness.” A quick glance through other remarks reveals similarly negative responses. Nevertheless, Cinderella II: Dreams Come True still made approximately $120 million in sales.

14 Best: Toy Story (100%)

Toy Story was ambitious in scope, it being the first animated Disney feature that was fully animated with CGI. Audiences had never seen this kind of animated film before and impressed audiences made the movie a runaway hit. Though CGI animated movies have come a long way since then, Toy Story still holds up. The interplay between Woody the Cowboy (played by Tom Hanks) and Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is the highlight of the film. Though they have different perceptions of reality, they learn to work together to make sure they don’t get left behind in their boy Andy’s move.

Toy Story garnered three Academy Award nominations and won a Special Achievement Academy Award for being the first feature-length computer-animated film. It has two hit sequels, with a third in production.

13 Worst: Blank Check (11%)

What if a kid found a blank check that allowed him to spend a million dollars? That’s the intriguing premise behind Blank Check, a movie that didn’t really build a successful story out of this great idea. Through an implausible series of events, young Preston Waters is given a blank check to help pay for a bicycle accident involving a car. But he’s given the wrong check, and the person who gave it to him is a criminal. Preston spends the rest of the movie spending lavishly while trying to avoid the authorities and the criminal who is hot on his tail.

One top critic explains it’s “One of those smart-aleck kid adventures that manages to be entirely obnoxious with very little effort.” A Rotten Tomatoes super reviewer hilariously opined, “If you loved Home Alone, you’ll still gonna hate Blank Check!”

12 Best: Darby O’Gill and the Little People (100%)

Though many modern audiences have never heard of Darby O’Gill and the Little People, it probably remains the most successful movie ever made about Leprechauns. In the film, the aging laborer and caretaker Darby O’Gill has spent much of his life trying to catch the Leprechauns. One day, in his old age, he is actually caught by them. He spends the rest of the film strategizing how he will spend the three wishes granted upon him by Brian, the King of the Leprechauns.

The film also features a young and dashing Sean Connery as Michael McBride, the love interest to Darby O’Gill’s daughter.

Though it won no awards, it has been critically well-received over the years and had state-of-the-art special effects for its day.

11 Worst: Mr. Magoo (7%)

The character of Mr. Magoo was a successful cartoon character from the late 40’s through the 50’s. The running gag for each story was that millionaire Mr. Magoo was practically blind, which led him into comically dangerous situations. Mr. Magoo was also amazingly lucky, which seemed to save him every time.

The Disney adaptation starred Leslie Nielsen, an actor beloved for being able to handle silly comedy with a straight face. But it just wasn’t enough to save the film, which seemed to suffer from the repetitive and unfunny gags. Critics were beyond cruel to the film. One announced, “The movie is an insult to the intelligence of the entire human race.” Another agrees, “Mr. Magoo is transcendently bad. It soars above ordinary badness as the eagle outreaches the fly. There is not a laugh in it. Not one.”

10 Best: Toy Story 2 (100%)

After the runaway success of the first Toy Story, a sequel seemed inevitable. Somehow avoiding the curse of most sequels being inferior to the original, Toy Story 2 managed to be a moving story which many think is even better than the first. It also introduced a brand new character to the saga, Jesse the Cowgirl.

Toy Story 2 has one of the most heartbreaking songs in Disney’s collection, When She Loved Me, performed by Sarah McLachlan. The song describes being abandoned by the child she loved, a sequence that left hardly a dry eye in the house. It went on to become a smash hit, just like the first one. Though it won no academy awards, it won many independent awards and some argue it is the best Toy Story movie of the entire franchise.

9 Worst: A Kid in King Arthur’s Court (5%)

A Kid in King Arthur’s Court is very loosely based on Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, a story that has been adapted into several other films. Modern ’90s kid Calvin Fuller is playing baseball for his team when an earthquake hits. A chasm opens up on the field and he falls in. Calvin is inexplicably transported to England in the age of King Arthur, where he quickly wows the locals with his modern knowledge. While there, he also falls in love with the local princess.

Critics seemed to be surprised this was a Disney film. One critic laments, “Rarely do the well-financed wizards at Walt Disney Pictures cook up a movie this badly written, acted, and directed.” Another says, “Sitting through it, I found myself shuddering at what Disney may have in store for next summer.”

8 Best: Old Yeller (100%)

Old Yeller was famous for ruining many a childhood with a depressing plot twist, the on-screen demise of its titular dog. After saving his family multiple times over the years from bears, wild hogs, and wolves, Old Yeller finally seals his fate when he fought off a rabid wolf to protect his people. Not only did the the dog pass away, but its owner and best friend Travis had to put him down himself because he had been infected with rabies. This scene has become one of the most famous tear-jerking live-action scenes in all of Disney’s films.

Despite the bummer plot development, the film was still a critical and commercial hit. And it still managed to leave on a high note—by the end, Travis adopts Old Yeller’s puppy and names him Young Yeller.

7 West: Meet the Deedles (4%)

As handsome as Paul Walker was, even he couldn’t have saved Meet the Deedles. The story describes the hapless Phil and Stew Deedle, brothers who are in high school and avid surfers. Their father becomes disgusted with their lazy behavior and sends them off to a boot camp where they can learn some discipline.

In an extremely unlikely series of events, the Deedle brothers assume false identities as park rangers and…hilarity is supposed to ensue.

As with most movies received this badly, the Rotten Tomatoes reviews are hilarious to read. One critic announces dryly, “If all of this sounds ridiculous, it is.” Another is much more cruel, saying, “Dumb is one thing, but this sorry attempt at action-comedy from stuntman turned director Steve Boyum is in an intelligence-deprived class all its own.”

6 Best: Snow White and the Seven Dwarves (98%)

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves was Disney’s first animated film feature and the first animated film to gain massive success. It was actually the profits from Snow White and the Seven Dwarves that allowed Disney to build its first full-fledged production studio in Burbank, California. From there, Disney was unleashed to produce dozens of huge hits.

Early forecasters predicted Snow White would be a huge flop, but Disney had the last laugh when the film was finally released. Critics, even the ones predicting its failure, absolutely loved it. Audiences flocked to it and children adored it. Walt Disney received a special Academy Honorary Award for making a “significant screen innovation.” The Honorary Oscar came with seven little miniature Oscars. As with Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella, Disney is producing a live-action adaptation of the film.

5 Worst: Mulan 2 (0%)

Did we ever even need a Mulan 2? According to critics, the answer is a resounding “no.” The original Mulan was a hit in 1998, following the adventures of the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan, a woman who became a fearsome warrior against all odds. Mulan 2 features a convoluted plot wherein Mulan prepares to get married and go on an important mission at the same time, trying to prevent several kingdoms from collapsing against the Mongolian hordes.

The plot doesn’t sound terrible, but it didn’t deliver. Critics seemed to dislike it mainly for being bland. One explained, “If it were any more trivial, it’d be invisible. Mulan II is, rather, more conceptually offensive.” Another spoke bluntly, “It’s harmless, sure, but it’s also charmless.” Another sequel was planned but eventually shelved.

4 Best: 101 Dalmatians (98%)

With 101 Dalmatians, Disney opted to develop a somewhat obscure children’s story.  This was a bit different from the popular fairy-tale adaptations that Disney had been known for. After a bachelor and his new blushing bride get married, their respective male and female adult Dalmatians breed a large litter of puppies. An over the top villain, Cruella de Vil, steals them along with other Dalmatian puppies with plans to eventually turn them all into a fur coat. The adult Dalmatians and other animals lead efforts to rescue ALL the puppies and bring them back to safety.

101 Dalmatians cut costs by adopting a more minimal animation style but still was a critical and financial success.

The movie was adapted into two live-action movies in the ’90s and also had an animated sequel in 2003.

3 Worst: The Big Green (0%)

Not many Disney fans know this film even exists. The Big Green was released in 1995 and tells the story of a scrappy British teacher who introduces kids with low self-esteem in a small Texas town the game of soccer. Sort of a Bad News Bears for the soccer crowd, the movie follows these underdog kids as they go from losers to heroes.

However, according to critics, it’s derivative and not as good as either of those films. Perhaps the poster, which features a young kid getting hit in the groin by a soccer ball, is the first sign the “comedy” wasn’t up to par. One critic writes, “The Big Green is at its worst and most desperate when resorting to ridiculous hallucinations and silly sped-up photography to get laughs, and it’s at its best when… well, it’s over.” Yikes.

2 Best: Cinderella (97%)

It’s hard to believe, but Disney suffered a bit of a downturn during WWII and by the late 40s was financially doing poorly. Disney turned back to its classic roots and decided to produce Cinderella, an old story based on folklore and also told in a classic Grimm’s fairy tale. The movie not only brought Disney out of debt, but gave the studio enough capital to create its own film distribution company, begin production on other films, and start building Disneyland and Disney World.

The movie received critical praise not seen since Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Pinnochio. Many noted its rich colors and backgrounds, realistic human animation, and memorable music. It was later nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Original Song for Bippity Boppity Boo.

1 Worst: Kronk’s New Groove (0%)

The Emperor’s New Groove was a unique and charming Disney film that has become somewhat of a cult classic over the years, featuring the voices of the hilarious David Spade and Patrick Warburton. Its sequel, Kronk’s New Groove was not received nearly as well. Part of the problem may be the thin plot, which has something to do with Kronk running a restaurant, falling in love with a camp counselor, and trying to impress his father. Yzma returns as a villain but doesn’t really have much to do.

Voice talents notwithstanding, the resulting film was a dud with critics.

Pointed out one, “Great voice talents, but weak storyline and frankly not much groove.” Another astutely observed, “It’s just too generic, and generic is not what we want from a sequel to a film that managed to escape the Disney mold.”

Which of these films did you love most? Let us know in the comments!



Source link
2018-10-07 06:10:17 – Gary Gunter

Twilight: 20 Things About Bella And Jacob’s Relationship That Make No Sense

The Twilight Saga dominated the teen world for years even after both the books and the movies were released. When the first book came out, neither Stephanie Meyer nor fans of the novel expected it to blow up into the pop-culture phenomenon it became. No matter where someone turned, a vampire or werewolf would be there to greet them. It was either immensely loved by fans or abhorred by people who just wanted the series to be over with. Either way, it was inescapable.

Part of the draw of Twilight was the divide between Team Edward and Team Jacob. The love triangle spawned intense debates among passionate fans. While a lot of fans favored Edward, who Bella inevitably chose in the end, Jacob had his fair share of supporters as well.

Despite all of the support, Jacob and Bella certainly had their own set of issues. If she had chosen Jacob, it definitely wouldn’t have been picture perfect, just like her relationship with Edward was flawed at times. While it’s easy for fans to believe Bella and Jacob were an ideal romantic pairing, their were some strange aspects of their relationship.

From controlling behavior to imprinting on babies, here are the 20 Things About Bella And Jacob’s Relationship That Make No Sense.

20 Bella Treats Jacob Like A Backup Plan

In New Moon, a lot of fans began to argue that Bella clearly has feelings for Jacob. As the series continue, that only became clearer, especially when she asked Jacob to kiss her in Eclipse. Despite being in love with Jacob, Bella constantly chooses Edward over him.

She can’t help what her heart wants, of course, but she continues to dangle her love in front of Jacob even though she knows it’s hurting him that she’s choosing Edward.

It’s like she’s keeping Jacob around and toying with his emotions in case it doesn’t work out with Edward. In New Moon, she only hangs out with him because she can’t be around Edward anymore, and continues with this behavior throughout the series.

19 Jacob Has Nice Guy Syndrome

Often times, Jacob comes off as the understanding, compassionate alternative to Edward. While he appears to be sweet and patient, he’s actually possessive and whiny a lot of the time when it comes to Bella. He would be understanding in order to try and get Bella to choose him, but when she would choose Edward, he would storm off in a fit of rage and try to guilt her into feeling bad. He would act like she owed him something more than her friendship.

Despite Bella clearly choosing Edward multiple times, he would always act surprised and hurt when she told Jacob she just wanted to be friends. Many fans believe that he’s sweeter than Edward, but both characters tried to manipulate her emotions.

18 Jacob Is As Dangerous As Edward

When Jacob tries to encourage Bella to choose him instead of Edward, he continues to insist on how dangerous the Cullens are, despite being dangerous himself.  While Edward is a bloodsucking vamp, Jacob is a werewolf with rage issues who spends his time fighting vampires. Choosing him over Edward wouldn’t be a much safer decision. Even if Edward and Bella had never met, vampires still would have been in Forks causing Jacob to shapeshift.

Even without the Cullens, threatening vampires like James would still be a threat that the wolves would have to fight, putting Bella in danger.

It doesn’t make sense to paint Jacob as the safer choice when werewolves are known to get into supernatural entanglements and lash out at those they love in anger.

17 They Have Zero Chemistry

While in the books it can be hard to gauge the chemistry between characters, in the Twilight movies, it was easy to see the lack of chemistry between many of the actors, including Kristen Stewart and Taylor Lautner. Though he was supposed to long for Bella while she secretly held feelings for him and didn’t want to admit it, it was hard to tell from their acting alone.

While the dialogue and their actions may have showed their feelings, the chemistry between them felt forced.  There have also been complaints that Robert Pattinson and Stewart also lacked chemistry. It doesn’t make sense to cast actors to play these characters in a love triangle who don’t play it believably.

16 Jacob Would Have Taken The Life Of Bella’s Baby

A lot of Jacob fans think he’s the warmer, more understanding man in Bella’s life, but there were moments when he acted even colder than Edward, like when decides he wants to take the life of Bella’s infant, despite her clear love for her child. It’s understandable that he’s angry that Bella’s life would end because of the child, but deciding to take the life of the woman he love’s baby is messed up regardless of his reasons.

Yes, Renesmee is technically a monster, but she’s still just a baby.

Before that, he pushes Bella to get rid of the baby and grows incredibly angry when she refuses, despite it being her child and not his. It’s really messed up to want to take the life of an infant, even if the same infant is the reason Bella perishes.

15 Jacob Tries To Control Bella

While a lot of people don’t like the way that Edward tries to control Bella, Jacob’s possessive behavior isn’t much better. Like Edward, he’s constantly trying to manipulate Bella’s feelings and actions. Their relationship has some abusive undertones. Jacob acts as if Bella can’t make her own decisions and is extremely overprotective. When he doesn’t agree with her choices, he’ll yell at her, become aggressive, or run away because he didn’t get his way.  

He even forcibly kisses her to try and convince her she feels something for him. While he’s easy-going and understanding on the surface, he’s controlling when he gets upset. The men in Bella’s life both try to manipulate her like she’s not capable on her own.

14 Bella Won’t Let Him Move On

While Bella does realize that she harbor’s feelings for Jacob, she still chooses Edward, over and over again. It’s clear that she will never decide to be with Jacob. Despite this, she continuously inserts herself into his life, which only causes him pain. Jacob eventually makes the decision to cut Bella out of his life in Eclipse because it’s too painful for him. Bella won’t accept that choice and selfishly tries to keep him in her life, but just as a friend. 

This is a big reason why Jacob grows more frustrated and angry with Bella when she keeps choosing Edward.

She is giving him false hope so that he can never fully move on, which isn’t fair to him and causes his unfair attitude towards her.

13 Jacob Yells At Her At Her Wedding

It’s totally understandable that Jacob wouldn’t want to watch the woman he loves walk down the aisle towards another man, but when he eventually does decide to show up, he ends up yelling at the bride on her wedding day.  He appears without warning and dances with Bella. Just when it seems like the two will be able to get along without arguing, he finds out that Bella will consummate the marriage despite Edward being a vampire.

This causes him to explode in anger at Bella. It’s hard to tell if it’s just fear for her life that makes him angry because he may also be reacting in jealousy. Regardless, he shouldn’t have shown up at her wedding when he clearly isn’t comfortable with Bella being with Edward.

12 Bella And Her Daughter Will Love The Same Man

It was strange enough when Jacob imprinted on Bella’s daughter, but it became even more uncomfortable when fans realized that Renesmee will likely kiss the same man who was in love with her mother one day. Bella and her daughter will one day have been romantically involved with the same man.

It’s also very likely that Renesmee will grow up to resemble her mother, which will have to be strange for Jacob.

It does seem that while Renesmee is still a child, Jacob and Bella have pushed the imprinting argument aside, but it’s bound to cause conflicts one day in the future. It’s not quite inappropriate, but it’s way too weird for most people’s comfort.

11 Jacob Is Closer With Bella’s Dad Than She Is

Throughout the Twilight movies, Bella repeatedly tells Edward how important Charlie is to her. However, her actions don’t seem to match her words. Even Jacob seems to be closer with Bella’s dad than she is.  Especially in the later movies, Jacob is seen with Charlie more than Bella is. He’s even the reason why Charlie gets to continue to have a relationship with Bella after she is turned.

When she and the Cullens plant to leave Forks, Jacob brings Charlie to Bella to get her to stay.  Without Jacob, Charlie would have lost his daughter forever. Even if Jacob did it for selfish reasons, he helps Charlie have a relationship with his daughter when she just planned on running away and hurting him.

10 Jacob Was Attracted To Bella Because Of Her Baby

From the moment Jacob saw Bella in the first Twilight film, it was clear that he was attracted to her. He continued to have feelings for Bella up until she had her baby, Renesmee. He imprinted on her immediately. Renesmee will also grow up to look a lot like Bella with her identical eyes and long, dark hair.

Since Jacob was into Bella before she was even pregnant, it could have been an attraction to her genetics and the child she would eventually create.

Jacob’s entire basis for falling for Bella may have been because his werewolf genes could sense that she would create the person he would eventually imprint on. The entire premise of imprinting on the woman he love’s child is too much of a weird coincidence.

9 Bella’s Anger At His Imprinting Is Hypocritical

When Bella first learns that Jacob is a werewolf, she’s intrigued by the concept and asks to learn more about the Quileute culture, including imprinting. While she’s a little unsure about the concept of imprinting at first, she comes around to it after Jacob explains that even if they imprint on a young girl, like Quil, who imprints on a two year old, their feelings won’t be romantic until she is of age.

Despite accepting this, she goes insane when she learns that Jacob has imprinted on her daughter, Renesmee. While it’s certainly a creepy situation, she was okay when it was someone else’s young child. Why not her own? It’s pretty hypocritical and doesn’t make much sense.

8 Jacob Is More Like Edward Than Bella Thinks

A big driving force in the Bella/Jacob/Edward love triangle is that Edward and Jacob are different. One is a vampire, the other a werewolf. Really, though, they aren’t as different as Bella and some fans want to believe. 

Both men love Bella in a possessive, overprotective way and try to tell her what’s best for her while ignoring her own opinions.

Edward follows her around and aggressively guards her, while Jacob pushes her to leave Edward to the point of lashing out in rage and running away. Sure, they have very different hobbies, with Edward being into books and classical music and Jacob being into action movies and motorcycles, but it seems that Bella has a thing for controlling, unstable men.

7 They Don’t Respect Each Other’s Choices

Throughout Twilight, Jacob and Bella never seem to be on the same page despite being “best friends.” Bella never really respects Jacob’s decisions and he is constantly telling her what she should think and do. Whenever Bella decides to be with Edward, Jacob tells her how wrong she is and tries to manipulate her into choosing him instead rather than accepting her decision.

Bella, also, refuses to respect Jacob’s decision to cut off his relationship with her because it’s too painful for him. She continues to insert herself into his life anyway.  They’re supposed to love each other, but refusing to respect one another is a strange way to show that love. It doesn’t make sense to treat the person you care so much about like a child who can’t make his or her own decisions.

6 Jacob Starts A War For Her

Despite all that happened throughout the first three Twilight installments, Jacob is still ready to perish for Bella in Breaking Dawn. Not only that, but he’s also willing to take lives and start wars in order to save her life. He was always a loyal pack member, but when he learned that Sam was going to take Bella’s life along with her future child’s, Jacob left the pack and started his own in order to save her life, causing a deep rift between the wolves.

Not only that, but he also was ready to stand by the Cullens when the Volturi came, despite them being a major threat to his own life, in order to protect both Bella and her daughter.

That’s a lot of sacrifice to make for a woman who didn’t choose to love him back.

5 Jacob Can’t Give Bella A Normal Life

While Jacob was once human, by the time the second book rolled around, he was transitioning into a shapeshifting wolf. Despite this, part of his reasoning why Bella should choose him is because she could stay human and live a normal life. However, dating a werewolf isn’t exactly a normal human thing to do.

Yes, Bella wouldn’t turn into an immortal vampire if she chose Jacob, but she would still be choosing to date a supernatural creature who brings danger into their lives. The wolves also don’t age as long as they’re still shifting, so Jacob would most likely outlive Bella if she were human. His reasoning about why she should choose him don’t always make sense.

4 If It Weren’t For Edward, They’d Be Together

If the Cullens hadn’t decided to settle in Forks, Bella’s love life would have been drastically different. She likely would have ended up with Jacob.  Their two families are very close, so they would have been spending a lot of time together. It’s clear that the pair has chemistry and they are attracted to each other.

Without Edward, she also wouldn’t have had Renesmee, so he would never have imprinted on her child.

Instead, he would stay in love with her. It seems clear from the books that if Edward weren’t around, she would have ended up with Jacob. It’s weird to think that their relationship could have been drastically different without one character being around.

3 Jacob Kisses Bella Against Her Will

While Bella does eventually kiss Jacob willingly, their first kiss wasn’t exactly consensual.  Jacob has always been a bit frustrated with Bella, but he took things too far when he grabbed her and forcibly kissed her on the beach. In the book, she even says that she shut down and didn’t reciprocate the kiss. Afterwards, she calls him an idiot and punches him.

While it was laughed off as a joke, it really wasn’t okay for him to kiss or grab her without her consent. Even Charlie laughs at the concept when Bella is obviously upset. It’s brushed aside like no big deal but it shows that Jacob has some control issues. It doesn’t make sense to romanticize the encounter like it was nothing when it was technically assault.

2 Bella Treats Jacob Like A Child

Edward and Bella’s age difference has always been weird. It doesn’t matter if he looks seventeen– she’s a teenager and he is over one hundred years old. Despite their very large age difference, she constantly jokes like Jacob is way too young for her.

While Bella and Edward’s age gap spans multiple decades, she and Jacob are only two years apart.

She acts like he is ridiculously younger than her when they really have way more in common than she and Edward do, and a lot of that has to do with their ages. It just doesn’t make sense to treat Jacob like a child when she should look like a child in Edward’s eyes.

1 Jacob Imprints On Bella’s Daughter

One of the strangest aspects of Twilight is Jacob’s imprinting on Renesmee. There’s no way to spin it without it being a little bit uncomfortable. Fans have been upset by the concept since they read the final book.

While she’s a baby, the feelings are platonic and protective, but it seems clear that everyone is banking on the pair being romantic once Renesmee is of age. When she’s older, Jacob will be in love with her after helping to raise her. To make things weirder, he’ll have to explain how he was once in love with her mother. There are so many potential endings that could have been written for Jacob, but this is the one that makes the least amount of sense to fans.

Are there any other aspects of Bella and Jacob’s relationship in Twilight that make no sense? Let us know in the comments!



Source link
2018-10-06 02:10:53 – Britt Poteet

Wesley Snipes Addresses Bad Behavior Rumors On Blade Trinity



Wesley Snipes has finally addressed reports of his almost legendary bad behaviour on the set of Blade: Trinity. The original Blade is credited with kicking off the modern comic book movie trend and featured Snipes as the titular vampire slayer. The movie had great action, a rich mythology, and perfect casting in Snipes, and the film’s unexpected success led to movies like the original X-Men getting the greenlight.

Snipes returned for Blade II, which was directed by Guillermo del Toro, and some fans would argue the sequel is even better than the original. Sadly, Blade: Trinity would prove a disappointing end to the trilogy; Snipes was visibly bored, the action was lackluster and the addition of new sidekicks – including Ryan Reynolds’ Hannibal King – felt like a transparent attempt to launch a spinoff. The movie was a modest success, but its weak reception essentially killed the series. Blade: Trinity would soon become the stuff of myths with reports of Snipes behavior during filming, including staying in his trailer all the time, ignoring his co-stars and clashing so often with director David Goyer that he’d only communicate with post-it notes – which he’d sign ‘Blade.’

Related: Wesley Snipes Didn’t Know Blade Was Almost Whitewashed

Snipes himself has never really addressed these reports, but in a new Vice interview, he finally opened up on the subject. Comedian Patton Oswalt – who had a small role in Blade: Trinity – has claimed Snipes stayed in character the entire shoot, which Snipes refutes, stating ‘Once again, I’ll say to you, sir, look at the source of information. I didn’t know Patton Oswalt was a method actor. Would he know the difference?‘ The actor also denied he mostly stayed in his trailer with a succinct ‘False.’ Snipes doesn’t quite refute the infamous post-it note rumors, however.

“That may have happened. I wouldn’t say it was frequent. Because our whole crew was banished to another side of the island of production. The only way we could sometimes get messages since we didn’t have the radio, was to get it there by courier or pigeon sometimes [laughs].”

According to other comments from the interview, Snipes was reluctant to commit to a third Blade and feels the blame for the final product was laid at his feet. Apparently, the original idea for Blade: Trinity was a Mad Max-style adventure where Blade would have to fight for mankind in a post-apocalyptic world overrun with vampires. Snipes was said to be on board with this concept, but once the story was changed to Blade vs Dracula, he turned against the project.

While Blade: Trinity isn’t quite as awful as its reputation would suggest, it was a major letdown following the first two movies. The movie is somewhat notable for Reynolds’ quippy performance, which feels like a dry run for Deadpool in some ways. While Trinity ended the series on something of a sour note, Snipes mentioned some potential upcoming Blade projects, so hopefully, he’ll get to redeem the series in the near future.

Next: Wesley Snipes Teases Two Upcoming Projects In Blade Universe

Source: Vice



Source link