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Charlie Cox Thinks The Defenders Was Too Slow, Still Wants Season 2

Marvel’s The Defenders miniseries had its issues, but Charlie Cox thinks there’s potential for a second season. The Daredevil star, who’s currently doing promotion for the third season of the Netflix Marvel universe’s flagship show, discussed the possibility of bringing all the New York heroes back together, and what needs to be different this time around to ensure it doesn’t continue to be the least-viewed Marvel series on the streaming service.

Cox isn’t the first actor to speak out about season 2. In March, prior to the release of Jessica Jones season 2, Krysten Ritter shared that if the opportunity came about, she would do another season, but that she didn’t think there were any plans to go down that path. However, more recently, at Baltimore Comic-Con, Mike Colter (who stars in Luke Cage) joked that the crowd didn’t cheer enough in response to a mention of The Defenders season 2, but then replied to the increased applause, “Alright, alright, maybe we can do something.”

Related: The Defenders Season 2 Probably Isn’t Happening

Now, Cox is adding his two cents, and he’s even more positive. Speaking with Metro, Cox revealed how much he enjoyed working on The Defenders. He said he got “a little kick out of” seeing how the four unique heroes came together, and worked side-by-side. The issue, Cox believes, was the format, agreeing with many fans that the season “felt too slow,” but that he thinks this is because there was an emphasis on setting things up naturally, and then they ran out of time to put a focus on the actual team-up.

Cox went on to praise showrunner Marco Ramirez for his ability to meld the very different heroes into one show, calling it a “mammoth undertaking” that “he did fantastically.” But moving forward, he sees the benefit in keeping things on a smaller scale. “I would like to see a story that is more in keeping with the show’s that we make, which is a little bit more grounded, a little more boots on the ground. I don’t want to see us try and compete with the Avengers in terms of the scope.” However, though he clearly has hopes for a season 2, Cox isn’t aware of any progress made toward making more of The Defenders.

Frankly, despite how cool it is to see worlds merge and superheroes team up, it’s hard to see the benefit of another season. The various loose ends from the final episode will (hopefully) be all tied up by Daredevil season 3, and it’s undeniable that the show was fraught with mistakes and plot holes. But that doesn’t mean it won’t happen in some capacity. Jeph Loeb, head of Marvel TV, made some intriguing comments last month, hinting that perhaps another season could involve a different group of heroes as the Defenders. Considering the wealth of captivating supporting characters the connected series have offered, this could be an idea worth exploring for Netflix.

More: The Defenders Season 2 Probably Isn’t Happening

Source: Metro



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2018-10-09 05:10:32 – Becca Bleznak

Sony’s Kraven Movie May Include Spider-Man, Will Adapt Last Hunt Story

Richard Wenk, writer of Sony’s Kraven the Hunter movie, has revealed he’s currently working on the script – and that the film could even feature Spider-Man. It seems Sony intends to draw upon the famous Kraven’s Last Hunt comic book arc.

Venom was something of a gamble for Sony Pictures; could their Spider-Man spinoffs possibly work? Although the critics haven’t been kind, the film’s box office performance has been even better than anticipated. It shattered October’s box office record, grossing $80 million domestically and a staggering $205 million worldwide in its opening weekend. So it’s hardly a surprise that Sony is now pushing full steam ahead with further spinoffs.

Related: All The Spider-Villain Movies Coming After Venom

The Discussing Film podcast posted an interview with Wenk, who’s dropped what may well be something of a bombshell for Marvel fans. Wenk has revealed that he’s playing around with the concept of Kraven’s Last Hunt – and that he’s currently envisioning a story in which Kraven “comes face-to-face with Spider-Man.

It’s an interesting world, a great character… it’s in the Spider-Man universe. I’m going to adhere very closely to the lore of Kraven the Hunter, and he’s going to come face-to-face with Spider-Man. I think that where we’re all circling is that this is Kraven’s Last Hunt, and whether this is the precursor to that movie, whether it will include it, we’re talking about those things. And even the idea that maybe Kraven could be like Kill Bill, basically a two-part movie. It’s all in the mix.

This is a pretty remarkable statement, as it suggests Spider-Man could yet be considered part of Sony’s Spider-villains universe. It’s important to stress that Wenk is pretty early on in the writing process; he’s at the stage where, as he puts it, “you just kind of throw everything at the wall” to see what sticks. And yet, not only does Wenk explain that he’s been enjoying a collaborative relationship with other Sony (and Marvel?) figures, but he also sounds very confident indeed when describing the plan to have Kraven face off against Spider-Man. Even his references to Kraven’s Last Hunt should be seen in that light; that arc focused on the relationship between Kraven and Spider-Man, and on Kraven’s desperate desire to prove himself the wall-crawler’s equal before he passed away. It’s very hard indeed to imagine a version of Kraven’s Last Hunt without Spider-Man in it.

Assuming Wenk is right, there are two possible ways this could play out. Venom was deliberately designed to be easily retconned into the MCU, and its director Ruben Fleischer has openly said he believes a crossover between Hardy’s Venom and Tom Holland’s Spider-Man is “inevitable.” Given that’s the case, Marvel and Sony could have agreed to incorporate the Sony films into the wider MCU, with Tom Holland serving as a bridge between the franchises. The other possibility is that Sony is looking to cast their own version of Spider-Man, so viewers would get two distinctive big screen Spider-Mans at the same time. That approach would surely cause some problems between Marvel and Sony, though. Only one thing is certain; right now, the writer of Kraven the Hunter believes that his film will feature Spider-Man. It’ll be fascinating to see if he’s right.

More: Venom Ignoring Spider-Man is MORE Faithful To Comics

Source: Discussing Film



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2018-10-09 04:10:30 – Thomas Bacon

Eddie Brock’s Notebook Reveals Carnage Backstory for Venom 2

Cletus Kasady’s backstory for Venom 2 is revealed thanks to Eddie Brock’s notebook from Venom. Sony’s decision to try and launch a cinematic universe of their own appears to have paid off. The Tom Hardy-led Venom just set the October opening weekend record, making a sequel almost inevitable. Through the use of its post-credits scene, Venom already established seeds for the sequel to grow as Woody Harrelson made a cameo as Cletus Kasaday, the psychotic killer who becomes Carnage in the comics.

It was originally just before production began on Venom that reports surfaced that Carnage would make an appearance. It was later reported that Harrelson had joined the film with speculation pointing to this being his true role. This began to see some fans expect to see Carnage fully realized at some point in the movie, despite him having no presence in the marketing. That is because director Ruben Fleischer is saving Carnage for the sequel.

Related: All the Spider-Villain Movies Coming After Venom

The post-credits scene for Venom only teased Kasady’s eventual escape from prison and his transformation into Carnage. As it turns out, Eddie’s interview with Cletus lasted far beyond what audiences saw. ComicBook shared an image of Eddie’s notebook that was on display at New York Comic Con, which details Kasady’s backstory that will be used for Venom 2. Between a massacre in New York and killing his grandmother, the Disciplinarian Administrator at St. Estes Home for Boys, and a random girl who wouldn’t go on a date with him, the notebook clearly establishes Kasady’s bloodlust.

Click Here To See The Notebook Photo

These details are instantly terrifying for fans and just goes to show how insane Kasady is, even before he becomes bonded with the Carnage symbiote. These multiple murders are villainous enough, but his twisted psyche is further highlighted by additional details. Eddie believes he has Oedipus Complex (the feeling of desire for the parent of the opposite sex) and is possibly the reason why he dug up his mother’s grave. Before that, Cletus tortured and killed his mother’s dog with a drill.

Kasady is a worthy villain for Venom and Eddie to hunt down based on his prior record and what he would surely do upon being freed. But, it would be the pairing of Kasady’s personality and the power of Carnage that makes him a supervillain-level threat. Since this notebook page and these details aren’t explicitly states in Venom, a sequel will likely retell parts of this backstory and maybe even show it through flashbacks. It could be difficult to do just that with a PG-13 rating, but Venom 2 isn’t expected to be R-rated either. However it happens, Carnage will be the villain of Venom 2 and at least we now know some of his backstory that Fleischer and company worked out for him.

More: Every Update You Need to Know For Venom 2

Source: ComicBook



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2018-10-08 09:10:59 – Cooper Hood

Venom 2 Will Not Be Rated-R Either, According to Avi Arad

Warning: This post contains SPOILERS for Venom

Sony is already thinking about Venom 2 and they won’t make the jump to an R-rating. After bringing Spider-Man into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Sony once again wanted to get a shared universe of their own. Tom Hardy was cast to lead Venom as Eddie Brock, and the early box office results – a record setting $80 million opening in October – indicate that this will hardly be the last Spidey-related property the studio makes. Next up is going to be Jared Leto’s Morbius, but attention is turning towards what seems to be an inevitable sequel.

Based on the post-credits scene for Venom, it’s quite clear where they want to take the character next. Eddie visits the prison cell of Cletus Kasady (Woody Harrelson), who ends the movie saying, “When I get out, and I will, there will be carnage.” An appearance by Carnage was heavily rumored for Venom and, with the violent symbiote set to be the villain of a sequel, many fans wanted to see Venom and Carnage let loose with an R-rating, but that isn’t happening.

Related: How Venom Sets Up A (Much Better) Sequel

Collider spoke to Venom producer Avi Arad about the chances for Venom 2 to move up the MPAA’s rating scale. After all, the first Venom was reportedly envisioned as an R-rated movie, but was PG-13 when everything was all said and done. Despite Carnage joining the mix, Arad doesn’t believe he can only be done right with an R-rating.

“When you hear Carnage, the only thing you can think of is R. But, if you know his story, if you really know the comic, there’s no R here. He’s a tortured soul. It’s not about what he does, because we never have to show the knife going from here to there, and the blood is pouring. What you have to show is, what is the motivation? Was he born like that, or [is he] someone we should feel for, because if you succeeding in making a villain someone you can feel for, jackpot.”

As disappointed as some fans may be that Venom 2 won’t jump to an R-rating, one can hardly blame Sony for sticking with a PG-13 vision. The first movie just broke box office records with a PG-13 rating even with largely negative reviews from critics. If a sequel is better executed and has more positive reactions, there’s no reason to believe Venom 2 won’t perform even better if Carnage is included. Sony found success with PG-13, so why would they switch to R and potentially shrink their audience?

Of course, this may still not sit well with many. But, Arad believes they’ll be able to craft the right story around Carnage that won’t mandate extreme violence or anything else that would warrant an R-rating. This will, obviously, put a ton of pressure on the writers of Venom 2 to do this, so that way they can make a complicated foe in Carnage, and then leave it up to director Ruben Fleischer (who will likely return for the sequel) to deliver on the action. Hopefully, Arad is proven to be true and Venom 2 does the story and characters justice in a PG-13 environment.

MORE: All the Spider-Villain Movies Coming After Venom

Source: Collider



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2018-10-08 08:10:47 – Cooper Hood

30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles

Landing a part in the latest major superhero movie release represents the pinnacle of many an acting career. Michael Keaton, Hugh Jackman, Chris Evans and, to some extent, Robert Downey Jr might not be the household names they are today were it not for their comic book exploits.

However, while headlining the latest cinematic effort involving a caped crusader of some kind represents a dream come true for many, it’s proven to be something of a nightmare for a rare few. Bad scripts, difficult directors and a toxic work environment are just some of the many myriad reasons cited by the actors and actresses in this list – yet that’s really only the tip of the iceberg. Studio politics, stalled contract negotiations or issues around costume, make-up and iffy computer effects have also played a role in making these superhero movies not-so-super for the stars involved.

More often than not, the resulting movie has been forgettable at best and downright terrible at worst – but there are exceptions to the rule. Sometimes, an actor ended up enduring a miserable time on an otherwise enjoyable project. Other times, far sinister things were going on, unbeknownst to many involved in the finished movie.

Plenty of flops feature on this countdown but some major moneymakers can be found too, with comic book movie properties tied to Marvel, 2000AD, DC and Titan Comics all present and not very correct. Yes, landing a part in the latest superhero movie blockbuster has represented the pinnacle of many an acting career down the years but for this lot, it represented the pits.

Here are 30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles.

30 Hugo Weaving – Red Skull

Hugo Weaving originally signed a multi-picture deal to play the Red Skull across various future Captain America movies. However, when the character returned in Avengers: Infinity War the character had been recast with The Walking Dead’s Ross Marquand taking Weaving’s place. It wasn’t a huge shock.

A few years prior, The Matrix actor told Collider playing the Red Skull was “not something I would want to do again.”

“It’s not the sort of film I seek out and really am excited by,” he said. “I increasingly like to go back to what I used to always do, which is to get involved with projects that I really have a personal affiliation with.”

29 Ryan Reynolds – Green Lantern

Ryan Reynolds has made no secret of the fact things didn’t exactly go to plan with 2011’s Green Lantern. He even went as far as to include a gag, poking fun at the project, in Deadpool 2. Though it’s something he is able to laugh about now, it’s clear the actor regrets signing on that particular dotted line.

“When we shot Green Lantern, nobody auditioning for the role of Green Lantern was given the opportunity to read the script because the script didn’t exist,” Reynolds told The Hollywood Reporter. The experience did at least teach him some valuable lessons about making superhero movies which was good news for Deadpool fans.

28 Jessica Alba – Invisible Woman

Jessica Alba’s experience playing Sue Storm in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer was so bad it left her considering a career change. “I wanted to stop acting. I hated it. I really hated it,” Alba told Elle [via SyFy].

“I remember when I was dying in ‘Silver Surfer’. The director [Tim Story] was like, ‘It looks too real. It looks too painful. Can you be prettier when you cry? Cry pretty, Jessica.’ He was like, ‘Don’t do that thing with your face. Just make it flat. We can CGI the tears in.'” She continued: “It all got me thinking: Am I not good enough?”

27 Ben Affleck – Daredevil

Ben Affleck doesn’t just regret starring in the 2003 movie adaptation of Daredevil, he hates it. Affleck let his feelings be known to TimeTalks [via NME] during a discussion about why he signed on for Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice. Affleck said: “Part of it was I wanted for once to get one of these movies and do it right – to do a good version. I hate Daredevil so much.”

“The Netflix show does really cool stuff,” he added.

“I feel like that was there for us to do with that character, and we never kind of got it right. I wanted to do one of those movies and sort of get it right,” Affleck stated.

26 Terrence Howard – War Machine

Terrence Howard has always blamed Robert Downey Jr for the fact he never got to reprise the role of James Rhodes in the Iron Man sequels. “It turns out that the person that I helped become Iron Man, when it was time to re-up for the second one, took the money that was supposed to go to me and pushed me out,” Howard told Watch What Happens Live [via Vulture].

Howard claims the studio offered to pay him “one-eighth of what we contractually had” and when he tried to call Downey Jr to talk about it “he didn’t call me back for three months.”

25 Idris Elba – Heimdall

Idris Elba’s experience working on Thor: The Dark World was so bad the actor described parts of it as “torture” to The Telegraph. In the interview, Elba recalled how he was forced to complete reshoots in London for the Thor sequel just days after return from filming the prestige biopic Mandela, in South Africa.

“In between takes I was stuck there [hanging from a harness], fake hair stuck on to my head with glue, this fucking helmet, while they reset, he said. “And I’m thinking: ‘24 hours ago, I was Mandela.’ … Then there I was, in this stupid harness, with this wig and this sword and these contact lenses. It ripped my heart out.”

24 Ryan Reynolds – Wolverine: X-Men Origins

Ryan Reynolds’ appearance as Deadpool in Wolverine: X-Men Origins was plagued with problems, starting with the character’s appearance. “He wound up being this abomination of Deadpool that was like Barakapool, with his mouth sewn shut and weird blades that came out of his hands and these strange tattoos and stuff like that,” he told GQ.

Though Reynolds objected, the studio pressed on.

“The conversation at the time was ‘If you want to play Deadpool, this is your chance to introduce him. And if you don’t want to introduce him in this fashion, we’ll have someone else play him.'”When the film leaked online and fans reacted angrily, Reynolds response was simple: “told you so”.

23 Ed Norton – Hulk

Ed Norton clashed with producers behind the scenes on The Incredible Hulk, having only agreed to play Bruce Banner on the proviso he could have a say on the script and direction of the film. Replaced by Mark Ruffalo in the MCU, Norton couldn’t resist having a dig at the film during an appearance on Comedy Central’s Roast of Bruce Willis.

“I tried to be like you,” he told Willis [via Indiewire]. “I did a big action movie called The Incredible Hulk. You know what went wrong? I wanted a better script…I thought we should make one Marvel movie as good as the worst Christopher Nolan movie, but what the hell was I thinking.”

22 George Clooney – Batman

Joel Schumacher’s Batman & Robin may have fallen flat with critics and fans alike but it proved to be a serious career wake-up call for its star, George Clooney. “Up until that moment, I was an actor only concerned with finding work,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “After the failure of that film creatively, I understood that I needed to take control of the films I made, not just the role.”

Clooney successfully banished memories of his time as Batman with next three films: Out of Sight, Three Kings and O Brother, Where Art Thou?

21 Tommy Lee Jones – Two-Face

Tommy Lee Jones hated working on Batman Forever or, rather, he hated working with co-star Jim Carrey. “I was the star and that was the problem,” Carrey explained on Norm MacDonald Live [via THR].

The situation came to a head when Carrey ended up in the same restaurant as Jones during filming.

“I went over and I said, ‘Hey Tommy, how are you doing?’ and the blood just drained from his face,” Carrey said. “He went to hug me and he said, ‘I hate you. I really don’t like you.’ And I said, ‘What’s the problem?’ and pulled up a chair, which probably wasn’t smart. And he said, ‘I cannot sanction your buffoonery.'”

20 Topher Grace – Venom

Topher Grace never felt entirely comfortable in the role of Eddie Brock/Venom having bagged the role in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3. “I was a huge fan of the character of Venom when I was a kid when Todd McFarlane brought him into the comic,” he told Michael Rosenbaum on the Inside of You podcast [via Cinemablend]. “And I was surprised and a little bit like ‘Huh?’ when they wanted me to play it.”

Not only does Grace accept he was miscast, but he also agrees Tom Hardy is perfect for the role. “When I look at it now… [at Tom Hardy’s Venom movie] I go ‘That’s the guy.'”

19 Mickey Rourke – Ivan Vanko

Micky Rourke trashed the bigwigs over at Marvel Studios for what they did to his character Ivan Vanko, in Iron Man 2. Rourke told Syfy that he had worked hard with writer Justin Theroux and director Jon Favreau to flesh out his Russian villain and turn him into a three-dimensional character. Someone behind-the-scenes had other ideas though.

“I wanted to bring some other layers and colors, not just make this Russian a complete murderous revenging bad guy,” he said. “Unfortunately, the [people] at Marvel just wanted a one-dimensional bad guy, so most of the performance ended up the floor.”

18 Alicia Silverstone – Batgirl

Alicia Silverstone was on the receiving end of some serious body shaming while working on Batman & Robin. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Silverstone, who was a huge star following the success of Clueless, was under intense scrutiny over her weight with one critic reportedly observing she “looked more Babe than babe.”

When rumor got out on set that she was having issues with her costume fittings, a storyboard artist ever put together a joke cartoon of Batgirl, mocking Silverstone’s issues.

The fake poster for Clueless 2: The Casting of Batgirl might have gone down well with the guys in the film’s art department but studio bosses were far from impressed.

17 Nicolas Cage – Ghost Rider

Nicolas Cage has previously spoken of his disappointment at his two Ghost Rider movies, which he felt played it too safe. Speaking to JoBlo [via Bloody Disgusting], Cage explained that he and writer David S. Goyer had always envisioned the films as being gritty and, most importantly, R-rated.

“Ghost Rider was a movie that always should’ve been an R-rated movie,” Cage said. “David Goyer had a brilliant script which I wanted to do with David, and for whatever reason, they just didn’t let us make the movie.” Though he believes there is the potential for someone else to take on the role and go down that dark path, Cage is done with the character.

16 Jim Carrey – Colonel Stars And Stripes

Jim Carrey stunned social media ahead of the release of Kick-Ass 2 by denouncing the film and its “level of violence” in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre. Carrey, who is an outspoken advocate for increased gun control, took to Twitter following the incident to explain that he could no longer support the film.

“I did Kick-Ass 2 a month b4 Sandy Hook and now in all good conscience I cannot support that level of violence,” he wrote [via The Guardian]. “My apologies to others involve[d] with the film. I am not ashamed of it but recent events have caused a change in my heart.”

15 Michael Jai White – Spawn

He may have been among the first African American actors to portray a major comic book superhero but Michael Jai White has little love for his sole outing as Spawn. In fact, White is a much bigger fan of his small but powerful role as the gangster Gambol in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

He even went as far as to conduct an interview with The Hollywood Reporter revisiting his performance alongside Heath Ledger.

During the interview, White couldn’t resist having a dig at Spawn: “There is no footage of me ever saying that I liked Spawn. I have never said that I thought that was a good movie.” Ouch.

14 Jared Leto – The Joker

Jared Leto was left far from happy with the version of Suicide Squad that made it to the cinemas. Asked by IGN whether any scenes involving the Joker were cut from the film, Leto let rip.

“There were so many scenes that got cut from the movie, I couldn’t even start. I think that the Joker… we did a lot of experimentation on the set, we explored a lot. There’s so much that we shot that’s not in the film,” he said. “If I die anytime soon, it’s probably likely that it’ll surface somewhere. That’s the good news about the death of an actor is all that stuff seems to come out.”

13 Halle Berry – Catwoman

Halle Berry’s regret at signing up for Catwoman was clear to see when she decided to make an appearance at the annual Razzie Awards back in 2005. A celebration of the year’s worst films and performances, Berry ‘won’ the Worst Actress gong for her efforts in Catwoman and, in a surprising turn of events, was on hand to deliver a memorable acceptance speech.

“I want to thank Warner Bros. for casting me in this piece-of-sh**, god-awful movie,” she said [via MTV], going on to mock the rest of her cast. “I’d like to thank the rest of the cast. To give a really bad performance like mine, you need to have really bad actors.”

12 Alan Cumming – Nightcrawler

Back when Alan Cumming was still in the frame to reprise his role as Nightcrawler in X-Men: The Last Stand, the Scottish actor shocked journalists with his response to the news Bryan Singer would not be returning for the third installment.

“I’m not disappointed, I can’t deny it,” Cumming said [via Movieweb]. “I think he’s really talented. I’m very proud of the film. I think it’s a great film. I didn’t enjoy working with him on the film.”

Evidently, Singer and Cumming didn’t see eye to eye on X-Men 2 though the source of their fractious relationship has never been divulged.

11 Ellen Page – Kitty Pryde

Ellen Page took to Facebook in 2017 to accuse director Brett Ratner of harassment during their time together on 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand. According to Page, Ratner mocked her sexuality during promotional work for the film. Page was only 18 at the time.

“‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’ He said this about me during a cast and crew ‘meet and greet’ before we began filming, X Men: The Last Stand,” Page wrote. “He looked at a woman standing next to me, ten years my senior, pointed to me and said: ‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’”

10 Michael Fassbender – Magneto

Back in 2016, during the Toronto Film Festival’s pre-opening-night fundraising event, honoree Michael Fassbender surprised those in attendance by laying into his performance as Magneto in X-Men: Days of Future Past. According to Vulture, during a segment in which clips from several of Fassbender’s films were shown, Fassbender started “cringing and rubbing his face with embarrassment”.

“I don’t actually like that performance there, to be honest,” Fassbender said after the highlights reel finished. “I just think it’s me shouting. It’s just like [making a face and flailing his arms around] some dude shouting.”

9 Jamie Bell – Thing

Rumoured unrest on the set of Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie, coupled with the movie’s bad reviews left a bad taste in the mouth of its star, Jamie Bell. “There were several things on that movie I was clearly not privy to because I’m just an actor and I just do my stuff on set,” Bell told the Los Angeles Times.

“Everything starts with the best of intentions. A production begins with the idea to make something that’s unique and original and with integrity,” he said.

“I don’t know what happened between the launch of the voyage and the arrival. I think we were all bitterly disappointed with that film,” stated Bell.

8 Josh Brolin – Jonah Hex

Production delays, directorial changes, script rewrites, reshoots, and some pretty heavy-handed editing helped make Jonah Hex one of the most disappointing comic book movies of all time. It’s something the film’s star, Josh Brolin, is only too aware of. In fact, he revealed in an interview with the Nerdist that he hates it just as much as everyone else.

“Oh, ‘Jonah Hex,’ hated it. Hated it,” he said [via Collider]. “The experience of making it — that would have been a better movie based on what we did. As opposed to what ended up happening to it, which is going back and reshooting 66 pages in 12 days.”

7 Jennifer Garner – Elektra

While Ben Affleck bounced back from his Daredevil movie, Jennifer Garner never quite got going again after her spin-off effort, Elektra, bombed. Though Garner has never spoken openly about the film, her ex-boyfriend and close friend Michael Vartan revealed to Us Weekly [via SFGate] that the Alias actress was very unhappy with how the film turned out.

“I heard [Elektra] was awful. [Jennifer] called me and told me it was awful,” Vartan said. “She had to do it because of Daredevil. It was in her contract.” Garner has never denied Vartan’s claims.

6 Edward Furlong – The Crow

The Crow: Wicked Prayer is an absolute stinker of a comic book movie and currently boasts a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

It’s star, Edward Furlong, struggled to show much in the way of enthusiasm for the role during an interview with Movieweb.

Asked about how he prepared for the film’s starring role, Furlong said: “It’s sort of like a really slow process that Lance Mungia, the director, and I went through. Initially, I was just attracted to the script because it was The Crow and I got to put on some leather pants and kick people’s ass.” Given how it turned out, he must be regretting signing up for such flimsy reasons.

5 Chloë Grace Moretz – Hit-Girl

Chloe Moretz made her name as Hit Girl in Mark Millar’s original Kick-Ass but, despite the first film holding a special place in her heart, she’s always been less enthusiastic about the sequel.

During an appearance on a panel at the Provincetown Film Festival in 2018, Moretz made those feelings crystal clear. “I love the franchise, I think the first movie was really, really special. I wish the second one had been handled in a little bit of a different way,” she said [via Cinemablend]. “Because I think we were all kind of looking forward to something a little different than what happened with it all.”

4 Kate Mara – The Invisible Woman

Kate Mara played Sue Storm in Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie and, in an interview with The Times[via Yahoo] revealed the negative aura surrounding the film made her “a little gun-shy” about seeing the finished film.

“You don’t always have to learn some incredible life lesson when making a s*** movie. Sometimes it’s just what happens,” she said. “[Fantastic Four] was a tricky shoot but you know when you know when you’re shooting it that a film isn’t going to be what you want it to be? That was not the case at all.”

3 Jamie Kennedy – The Mask

Son of the Mask saw Jamie Kennedy replace Jim Carrey as the franchise’s star, with almost unwatchable results.

Though the movie is widely regarded as one of the worst ever made, Kennedy’s biggest regret may boil down to the make-up he had to wear on the film.

“I wore it 6 days in a row, and after that it gets rough,” he told Movieweb. “I had ears in this one, and Jim Carrey didn’t in the first one, so they would like press against my real ears and cut the circulation, so I would have to like rub my ears a bit after having on the makeup to get the blood flowing again.”

2 Sylvester Stallone – Judge Dredd

Despite starring in such turkeys as Over The Top, Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot and Oscar, Sylvester Stallone’s biggest regret was reserved for another movie. “The biggest mistake I ever made was with the sloppy handling of Judge Dredd” he once declared [via Den of Geek]. “The philosophy of the film was not set in stone – by that I mean, ‘Is this going to be a serious drama or with comic overtones’, like other science fiction films that were successful? So a lotta pieces just didn’t fit smoothly.”

“The design work on it was fantastic, and the sets were incredibly real, even standing two feet away, but there was just no communication,” he stated.

1 Lori Petty – Tank Girl

Lori Petty had a very particular gripe with the way things turned out for her Tank Girl movie: it was given an R rating. “There is nothing about that movie that is R. Nothing. Except there’s a woman talking s***. That’s why they rated it R. If they were going to rate it R I should have been butt-naked all the time, running around,” she told AV Club.

Tommy Boy came out that weekend, too, which is a hysterical movie, but it was rated PG-13. Do you know how many people bought Tommy Boy tickets and went to see Tank Girl? A billion.”

Are there any other superhero actors who regretted their roles? Sound off in the comments!



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2018-10-08 03:10:25 – Jack Beresford

A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad (And Always Has Been)

WARNING: Major spoilers for A Star Is Born

A Star Is Born‘s ending undoes what could have been a Hollywood classic – but that’s not exactly Bradley Cooper’s fault. From its first version in 1937, A Star Is Born has always had a problematic resolution to its story, one that’s only got worse over the past century, and this latest version is no different.

A Star Is Born is a classic story that Hollywood loves so much it’s told it four times (with a suspiciously-similar earlier version, several failed attempts and many, many imitators). A top-of-his-game star (in 2018, Bradley Cooper’s rock star Jackson Maine) is suffering from alcoholism and in a stupor discovers a struggling artist (Lady Gaga as Ally, a waitress moonlighting in a drag bar), falling in love with both her and her talent. He provides her with a big break, sending her fame into the stratosphere just as his addictions begin to derail his career. The pair marry, but despite their love things begin to fray.

Related: Read Our A Star Is Born Review

It’s a tale of rags to riches, of falls from grace, of the power of love, and personal identity within all of that. And, for much of the runtime, A Star Is Born 2018 is genuinely a great version of all those stories. Gaga’s first major concert leaves you floating, Cooper shows mental affliction with grace, both perform their songs incredibly (to actual live crowds, no less), and are utterly believable as troubled lovers. It is, for much of its runtime, a very good film worthy of that deafening hype.

However, everything implodes into a black hole of pretentiousness as what could have been a great film its own right has to follow through on being called A Star Is Born

  • This Page: The Problem With A Star Is Born’s Ending
  • Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad
  • Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

What Happens In A Star Is Born’s Ending

We’ll stick with Cooper’s take for now before going deeper into the past. A Star Is Born‘s third act is kicked off by Ally winning the Grammy for Best New Artist – a major step for her career, undercut entirely by Jack drunkenly taking to the stage with her and relieving himself on live TV. He goes into rehab and she wrestles with where her focus should lie, eventually deciding to try and protect her recovering husband. She cancels her European tour when her agent, Rez, blocks the duo playing together.

As a result, Jack kills himself. He’s confronted by a seething Rez who has no sympathies or expectations of sobriety and states outright Jack’s ruining his wife’s career. When she matter-of-fact states the tour cancellation, he sees the impact of his actions and, while she plays a concert, he hangs himself in their garage.

Related: Every Song On A Star Is Born’s Soundtrack

This breaks Ally at first, leaving her emotionally distraught, before her understanding the meaning of Jack’s sacrifice – to enable her to truly become the star he always saw – helps her pull through. The film ends at a tribute concert in Jack’s memory. “My name is Ally Maine.” she declares before singing “I’ll Never Love Again”, a song based on their relationship they wrote together while he was recovering. A flashback shows the pair singing, she looks through the camera at the audience, the end.

Why A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad

Removing the ending of all presentation and self-imposed importance (a character looking into the camera at the end is an overused trope that Cooper simply doesn’t earn), in just writing down the events of A Star Is Born its problems should be obvious.

Jack decides to kill himself to save his wife, committing suicide because it’s the only way to set her free. This comes about two hours into a film which has slowly built up its numerous interpersonal relationships, and so comes as a drastic and rather unearned turn. Now, there is an argument to be made about accuracy to the unpredictability of mental illness, but given the intimacy audiences had with both Jack and Ally up until this moment, that doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. A Star Is Born, plainly, presents suicide as the only way out. It’s meant to come across as a selfless act but still values success as a true route to happiness, meaning anything emotional about the “gesture” is laced with hypocrisy.

But it’s what comes after and Ally’s coming to terms with her loss that’s so disquieting. For all her innate talent being the drive of the story and her freely made decision to step back what motivated Jack to kill himself, the final scene makes everything about Jack; the mononymous singer for the first time takes on her husband’s surname at his concert, where she performs a song that he helped her write in her original singer style. The suggestion is meant to be that Jack was holding her back, but in the shadow of the previous two hours the strange implication is that the act of a true star being born came from the adversity of Jack’s sacrifice. Making Ally’s success symbiotic to her dead husband is already heavily in the text of the film, but the final scene makes her final ascension even more indebted to his drastic act.

It’s hard to not read A Star Is Born‘s ending as trivializing suicide down to a plot point to give the fundamentally broken male lead the defining role in its female protagonist’s arc. It’s a weird move to make in 2018, although don’t believe this is just the product of an 80-year-old movie being remade. There’s something flawed at the heart of A Star Is Born.

Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad

The True Story Behind A Star Is Born’s Ending Explains The Problem

There have been four versions of A Star Is Born: the 1937 Hollywood-skewering original starring Janet Gaynor and Frederick March, the 1954 musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 shift to the music industry with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the latest Cooper/Gaga release. Each one has its own quirks, but all endeavor to tell the same story of love and fame intertwined, and all have the same basic ending. But the 1937 version isn’t the start. While A Star Is Born‘s narrative is a fiction, it’s very much based on truth; each movie is rooted heavily in the entertainment industry of the time – Hollywood for the 1937 and 1954 versions, music for 1976 and 2018 – and aims to tell an encapsulating story. There are some real-life events that inspired it.

The established star falling for an unknown as she climbs to the top was seen in actors Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay’s relationship, with the pair marrying in 1928 when the former was an unknown after starring in a Broadway show together. Their marriage fell apart after she rose above him and he fell into alcoholism. They separated in 1935 after seven years of marriage, two years before A Star Is Born was released. This appears to have been composited with the death of silent film actor John Bowers, who died at sea in 1936 after failing to win a part (whether it was a suicide or not is unclear). There are others (as we’ll see) but these are regarded as the ones who powered the 1937 version.

Related: Lady Gaga Fans Are Trolling Venom With Fake Bad Reviews

Of course, there’s one key distinction between inspiration and movie: in real life, it was two unrelated stories. There are the famous lovers who piggyback success and the past-it star who takes his own life, but in all cases these two aspects are entirely independent; the woman goes on to greater success by cutting the man out, while elsewhere another man falls from grace. Both stories epitomize Hollywood together, and taken alongside each other rather than melded have an ingrained believability. A Star Is Born trades that for something more streamlined in having the suicide be the culmination of the romance, but it’s also idealistic and wistful, losing the real moral of either.

This is reflected in what is regarded as a proto-Star Is Born, the 1932 film What Price Hollywood? Released five years before the 1937 version and produced also by David O. Selznick (and directed by George Cukor, who was approached for the first A Star Is Born and directed the first remake), this is regarded as something of a dry run at the story. Obviously from the release year it can’t share the same real-life inspirations (although, because this is the Golden Age of Hollywood, there are others pointed to), but the core concept and even smaller story beats are there, albeit with one massive difference: the leads are not romantically involved. Lowell Sherman’s Max drunkenly finds Constance Bennett’s Mary and helps make her a star, eventually killing himself after he sees realizes how far he’s fallen and is hurting his friend, while Mary’s suffers an ill-fated marriage that breaks down due to her absences filming and is reconciled at the end.

Watched today, What Price Hollywood? has a cynicism about the film industry ahead of its time despite ultimately being a movie romanticizing Hollywood – and at the core of this is the tragic story of Max and its impact on Mary’s life. The title question is apt.

How The Remakes Have Tried To “Fix” The Ending

In contrast to What Price Hollywood?, A Star Is Born 1937 carries a self-awareness and charm, but in bridging the romantic and the career side of protagonist Esther creates the problematic suicide reading. It’s not helped by dated elements, including the defining part of Esther’s ascension being the actress known as Vicki Lester taking on her husband’s name with a declaration “This is Mrs. Norman Maine“. It works given the time period, but even 16 years later needed an update.

Related: Watch the Trailer For A Star Is Born

The 1954 version is, for the most part, a beat-for-beat remake, just with dance number expansion to make it a musical, but it does make some strides to justifying the ending. The toll that caring for a drunk has on Judy Garland’s Vicki Lester is shown gradually, most upsettingly in an off-stage breakdown she immediately returns to filming from: an unavoidable presentation of the line between art and performer. But, ultimately, it ends in the same way: Norman Maine overhears Vicki’s plans to quit acting to care for her husband, so he feigns going for a swim and drowns himself; after a traumatic period and being unmasked at her funeral (the invasion of the press), Vicki returns to the public eye where she declares herself “Mrs. Norman Maine“. Every issue discussed is here.

The 1976’s A Star Is Born is overall incredibly melodramatic, nowhere less than its handling of the ending. What it should be praised for is its attempts at giving the female lead a greater sense of autonomy: throughout Streisand’s Esther makes decisions that power the narrative, not just being led along by Kristoffersen as those who came before her, but that’s lost thuddingly in the finale. After his meltdown, John Howard has imposed isolation – not rehab – and when returning home immediately sleeps with a reporter wanting an interview for Esther. The couple tries to power past this, but John figures he’s still broken and crashes his car at high speeds. Again, Esther is sad before taking his name (and singing at a tribute event).

Like we’ve already explored with A Star Is Born 2018, all versions have tried to provide their own contemporary spin on the tale to iron out its kinks, yet all wind up having to repeat the same suicide-anger-name triple-tap that doesn’t belong. A degree can be accounted to the changing times, but that ignores that the original trio of movies released over nearly 40 years, and that Cooper wasn’t able to address it either.

Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

Why Bradley Cooper Can’t Fix A Star Is Born

Bradley Cooper certainly tries to bring a modern slant to the worn tale of A Star Is Born. He invests heavily in making Jack and Ally’s opposite trajectories operate independently – Jack is suffering from tinnitus before he’s heard a note of “La Vie En Rose”, while Ally’s SNL appearance is deemed to contradict his advice – while making the love story more immediate. It’s a bigger story, more personal and considerably more consummately paced.

But, like all the others, the ending hits a snag. And some of his decisions make it worse. The method of final descent is different, with the awards show upset and rehab undone not by Maine going off the rails again as in every other take, but rather by Ally’s agent calling his supposed bluff. It’s implied from the British Rez knowing when exactly Jackson first toured across the pond that he was once a fan, now disillusioned with his hero, making him a millennial scapegoat to any affronting reading.

Related: 2018 Fall Movie Preview: The 30 Films to See

This generational push and pull could have been what sent A Star Is Born to greatness. Sam Elliott’s speech about there only being twelve notes played over and over, with the majesty coming from how the artist uses them is a beautiful sentiment that sees Cooper self-justifying another remake and appears like a zen view on the entertainment business that birthed it. Except it isn’t, because this idea is also trying to explain the ending, claiming that the music industry is cyclical and that stars are born and then new stars are born later; Jack’s death is enabling that. What the film seems to miss is that for one state to ever enter another, a star must always die. Ally will fall too. The raw textual argument is that the failures are as eternal as the successes, raising the question of worth, yet the film provides no further exploration and presents it as somehow immediately uplifting.

And that’s the hump that A Star Is Born 2018, like its predecessors, can’t get over. The story thinks it’s a biting, self-aware take on itself, but it’s too close to the subject to see that it’s really just propagating a harsh cycle. This isn’t helped by the film being weighted by so much – the casting of Lady Gaga, his writer-director-producer-actor whammy, even Sam Elliott as the Sam Elliott-type – although those concerns are also the key explanation for what’s really going on.

A Star Is Born Only Exists Because Of Ego

Throughout this article, there’s been one question dangling unspoken. Why are there four versions of A Star Is Born anyway? It’s a story that is flawed and dated, on a topic which has been tackled in more films than any other. Yes, each movie got serious Oscar nominations and wins, but that alone isn’t enough to justify going back. The true answer is enlightening.

1954’s A Star Is Born was conceived as a bid to restart Judy Garland’s career after it stalled over the 1940s. 1976’s A Star Is Born was Barbra Streisand’s attempt (along with then-husband Jon Peters) to boost her standing in Hollywood. And 2018’s A Star Is Born is Bradley Cooper’s grand attempt to win the Oscar that he believes he deserves (his entire post-Hangover career is a carefully played game of chess with a Golden Baldie the King). There are studio concerns too (before Cooper, Warner Bros had been attempting to get a remake off the ground since the early 2010s, although as a Beyonce vehicle has the same career expansion goals), but those are the primary purposes of each version. A Star Is Born is a vanity project on repeat.

Related: A Star Is Born Is An Oscar Favorite – But Could An Infamous Producer Hurt Its Chances?

Now, vanity projects needn’t be bad, and indeed a lot of good comes from each of these attempts. Indeed, each was ultimately successful in both their primary and commercial goals: Garland’s career was rejuvenated; Streisand won her second Oscar; and Cooper’s currently the front-runner in multiple categories for next year’s Academy Awards.

But this aspect appears to be why each version of A Star Is Born struggles to understand the real meaning of its ending. Each powering force believes this movie will be what takes them being a Norman/Jack Maine to a new Esther/Ally while missing that it’s built into the story to be impossible. They believe so much in the two contradictory Hollywood legends wholesale, so don’t see that the story is almost warning against such a thing.

A Star Is Born Is No Longer Needed

In recent years, we’ve seen Hollywood’s reliable rotation of movies about itself take a genuinely incisive slant. 2015’s Best Picture Winner Birdman was an ostentatious exploration of ego that too ended with the protagonist committing suicide, but there it was with the wry critique that fame and adoration are fleeting and that such a bold act was the only way for the self-involved hero to reach the heights he dreamed of. Then there’s 2017’s almost-Best Picture Winner La La Land, which was a celebration of Hollywood-gone-by looking at love in a city of stars, eventually concluding that success required the sacrifice of the central relationship.

Together, these take on all the ideas that A Star Is Born is playing with and apply them in a more thoughtful way. The messages are more widely applicable and their endnotes have considerably less of the hypocrisy. Birdman and La La Land may find joy in the arts, but they also uncover the trials of creativity and fame, keeping the brutal truths in earshot while presenting from a position of success.

A Star Is Born 2018 is a good movie, an undeniable achievement for both Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. But there is a flaw at the heart of the tale that just doesn’t ring true. Unless it’s made with a completely revisionist, ego-less eye, in twenty years we do not need another one.

More: Every Version Of A Star Is Born Ranked, From Garland To Gaga



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2018-10-06 01:10:52 – Alex Leadbeater

Exclusive Fear The Walking Dead Clip: A Stranded Strand Believes In The Impossible

In an exclusive new clip, Fear the Walking Dead finds Victor Strand (Coleman Domingo) acting uncharacteristically optimistic in the midst of yet another life-threatening situation. Season 4 of The Walking Dead spinoff has just about reached its conclusion, but before it does the series has several character threads it needs to wrap up. Not the least of them is the question of how Strand and the injured John Dorie (Garret Dillahunt) are going to get out of the predicament in which they find themselves: trapped alone on an island with little hope of rescue. 

Since taking over as co-showrunners for the show’s now departed creator Dave Erickson, Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg have made dramatic changes. In addition to getting Fear on the same timeline as its older sibling, the new showrunners have made Lennie James’ Morgan the series’ ostensible lead, a move that came after some divisive cast developments that meant losing both Kim Dickens and Frank Dillane. But losing two original cast members paved the way for season 4 newbies, played by Jenna Elfman, Maggie Grace, and the aforementioned Dillahunt. The new season has even made room for former 12 Monkeys start Aaron Stanford. 

More: The Good Cop Review: Tony Danza Charms In Otherwise Tepid New Series

The clip from Sunday’s ‘I Lose People’ shows off some of the other changes that have happened in the recent season, namely, the response of characters to otherwise insurmountable odds. That’s certainly a big part of what’s going on in the discussion between Strand and John, as the former suggests there’s no such thing as impossible, even when their situation appears to be just as dire as it ever was. Check out the clip below: 

There is admittedly not a lot to go on and there’s no indication of what’s happening with the other storylines, especially the one Strand seems to be most fascinated by: Charlie and Alicia working together. Still, what it may lack in big picture details, it makes up for in Strand’s surprising pep talk to John who’s still nursing that injury he received earlier in the season. 

With season 5 having already been announced, and so many major characters having already been killed off this season, Fear the Walking Dead will have its work cut out for it in order to make this a memorable finale. Perhaps, given Strand’s outlook, this will be the rare Walking Dead season that ends on a high note. 

Next: Maniac Review: Surreal Limited Series Is Gorgeous But Falls Short Of Transcendent

Fear the Walking Dead continues with ‘I Lose People,’ Sunday night @9pm on AMC.



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2018-09-21 05:09:35 – Kevin Yeoman

IT Chapter 2 Writer Believes Ending Will Break Fans’ Hearts

Pennywise is coming back to Derry in IT: Chapter Two, and while the film will surely make fans jump out of their seats, writer Gary Dauberman says it will also break some hearts. One of last year’s biggest surprises was director Andy Muschietti’s theatrical take on Stephen King’s novel IT, which broke box office records, and gained praise not only for the performances of the young cast but also the way the story was adapted.

IT: Chapter One covered half the novel, following a group of kids self-named “The Losers Club” as they come face to face with an evil, shape-shifting entity whose preferred form is that of Pennywise, the dancing-clown. IT: Chapter Two will take the audience back to the fictional town of Derry, as the adult versions of the Losers take on this evil foe one more time and bring the story to a close. Being a horror film, fans can naturally expect suspense and jump scares here and there, but according to the sequel’s writer, fans can also expect some heartbreak.

Related: IT 2 Director Shares Bloody Bev Photo As Jessica Chastain Wraps

During an interview with Slash Film, while promoting The Nun, writer Gary Dauberman was asked about IT: Chapter Two, and whether the film reaches the end of the book or if there will be more from Pennywise and the Losers. Dauberman answered that it’s a complete story, and as for the ending, he thinks it “will satisfy the audience and maybe break their hearts a little bit”.

Dauberman also spoke a bit about the challenges that came with writing this second part. At the end of IT: Chapter One, fans saw the Losers take a blood oath – promising they would return to Derry to destroy the creature if it came back – and say their goodbyes as the group went their separate ways. In the second part of the story, the Losers are all in different parts of the country, which was a challenge for Dauberman, as there had to be a sort of “introduction” to their adult versions.

In the novel, the adult part is pretty emotionally charged at some points, showing the contrasts between childhood and adulthood, how relationships change through time, and how fears are more complex when one becomes an adult. The ending has received mixed reactions over the years, and it’s unknown if the film will stay true to it or tweak things a bit – after all, various details have already been changed so far. Could the heartbreak mentioned by Dauberman be a result of Losers dying that originally didn’t in King’s classic story? It’s a completely open question.

The team behind IT: Chapter Two has been very careful in what they say and what they share on social media in order to not give anything away – even the set photos that have made their way to the internet don’t tell much, and while some appear to reference key moments from the book, nothing on that end is confirmed. What’s known for sure is that the sequel will be scarier and more intense – and that “intensity” might not only be in terms of scares, but other emotions as well.

More: IT Chapter 2: The Weirdest Things That Happen In The Book

Source: Slash Film



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2018-09-07 05:09:27 – Adrienne Tyler