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11 Canceled DC Movies That We Wish Got Made (And 9 That Still Could Be)

Daring to be vastly different in terms of tone and of scope than the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the DC Extended Universe looked to kickstart their entire shared universe with Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn Of Justice, as opposed to Marvel’s formula of introducing all of these characters firsts and then do a big team-up movie. The result was a very busy, very ambitious, and ultimately very divisive movie. The darker and grittier take on the entire DC Universe was not a welcomed one. Introducing a lot of characters and concepts upfront that the mass audience didn’t work nearly as well.

DC’s parent company, Warner Bros. deemed the film and Justice League flops and growing criticisms of the movies had become too much for the studio to bare. They canceled a lot of executive producer Zack Snyder’s plans, leaving whatever was going to happen in the DCEU by the wayside in favor of whatever individual creators want to do with the characters. That’s just the recent turn of events.

DC movies have been being canceled or shelved and put on the back burner for years now. The fourth Superman and Batman films flopped and it took years to get those franchises back off the ground. For many, the Man Of Steel still hasn’t actually soared again. Slowly but surely, fans are learning there’s more to DC than just Supes and Bats. The best-kept secret here is that if DC could get their act together, they’d have a dearth of movies for years and years to come just like their competition. Here are 11 Cancelled DC Movies That We Wish Got Made (And 9 That Still Could Be).

20 Canceled: Batman: Year One

At this point in Batman’s eighty-year history, you’d be hard pressed to find someone who didn’t know what happened to Bruce Wayne’s parents in Crime Alley. What some people might not know is the story of Batman’s first year as the Caped Crusader, Frank Miller’s epic Year One storyline.

That was all going to change in the early 2000s when Miller wrote a screenplay for Darren Aronofsky to direct. But their clashing over ideas and Warner Bros. desire to take the project in another direction (which ultimately became Batman Begins), led to the end of this film’s production.

19 Still Could Be Made: Batman Beyond

How many more ways can you tell the Batman story? That’s the beauty of Batman, it can be told a multitude of ways. Batman Beyond brought Batman decades into the future where an aging Bruce Wayne trains a young Terry McGinnis to be the new Batman. For fans for the TV series and movie, Return Of The Joker, this is THEIR Batman.

These fans still might get their wish one day. The thought of a Batman Beyond movie is bandied about every few years or so. Recently, Entertainment Weekly made a mock cover for April Fool’s with Michael Keaton returning as old Bruce Wayne. Hopefully, someone at Warner Bros. saw it and is ready to make this a reality.

18 Canceled: Superman Lives

Before the DCEU as we know it today became much maligned, the mere thought of Nicolas Cage as Superman was a headscratcher. But with the combined efforts of writer Kevin Smith and director Tim Burton at the helm, Superman Lives was intended to reboot the series while adapting “The Demise Of Superman” storyline for the big screen.

Alas, this film was doomed from the start. Details of the making of (and eventual end of) the project can be seen in the documentary, The [Demise] Of Superman Lives – What Happened? All producer Jon Peters seemingly wanted was for Superman to fight a giant spider in act three…just let that ruminate for a moment. The movie that Peter’s beloved arachnid finally appeared in? Wild, Wild West.

17 Still Could Be Made: Plastic Man

In 1995, the Wachowskis had written a script for DC’s Plastic Man. Nearly 13 years later, rumors were still swirling that the siblings and Keanu Reeves were collaborating to bring the story of Patrick “Eel” O’Brian, former crook turned to hero, to the big screen.

As of this writing, it has since been announced that unknown Amanda Idoko is trying to tackle the stretchy superhero. There is no telling if she has access to, or even wants to borrow elements of the Wachowski’s script. But depending on what happens during the development, shooting, and release of the movie; if it’s successful, Warner would certainly be open to dusting off the nearly 25-year-old script.

16 Canceled: Justice League: Mortal

George Miller is one of the most versatile writers and directors in all of Hollywood. The same guy that wrote and directed the Mad Max series also did the same thing for the Happy Feet and Babe series of films. Around the era of The Dark Knight trilogy, Miller was looking to bring the Justice League to the big screen.

The writer’s strike and budgetary concerns led Warner to back out of the project, but it would have had the look and feel of Mad Max Fury Road. That movie was nominated for an Academy Award, so who knows where the DCEU would be right now if we lived in a world where we got see George Miller’s JLA.

15 Still Could Be Made: The Batman

Affleck might be out, but his version of Batman was still much better than anyone expected or hoped for. His version of a slightly older Batman was praised and reports that he would be writing, directing, and starring in his own solo Bat-flick was met with fervent anticipation.

Affleck backed out of his Bat-commitments but the story of a Batman battling Deathstroke The Terminator is still alive and well in the form of director Matt Reeves’ Batman, currently aimed for a June 25, 2021 release. Whether the popular villain continues to be a part of it or not, remains to be seen.

14 Canceled: Batman 3

After Batman Returns, Tim Burton was gearing up for a third movie, tentatively titled, Batman Continues. Scripted by Lee Batchler, Burton had sought after Robin Williams, this time to play The Riddler. Billy Dee Williams’ Harvey Dent was slated to become Two-Face, and Brad Douriff had been tapped to play the Scarecrow.

However, Warner Bros. was more interested in how and who to market their Batman movies to then how to make them. Wanting to make more family-friendly fare (re: TOYS), they asked Tim Burton to take on a producer role in favor of Joel Schumacher and kinder, gentler, Batman.

13 Canceled: Superman: Flyby

J.J. Abrams has been the go-to guy for anything science fiction or fantasy related for nearly twenty years now. The mastermind behind shows like Fringe and Lost, as well as rebooting both Star Wars and Star Trek franchises nearly rebooted the Blue Blur himself with Superman: Flyby.

Abrams’ Superman story was wildly different than the universally accepted origin story. Couple that with the fact the familiar elements that were there had to be explained (ie – Clark’s glasses are lead-lined to help control his supersight) angered fans in a way that had this have gotten made, Zack Snyder might not be responsible for the worst Superman film.

12 Canceled: Green Arrow: Escape From Super Max

The opening few episodes of season seven of Arrow featured Ollie in jail. His friends and family are trying to get him out and clear his name. Meanwhile, he faces all kinds of enemies on the inside and outside. He has to work to save his hyde in prison while trying to keep his family safe from threats outside of it.

If that sounds like a cool idea for a movie, that’s because at one point it was. David S. Goyer has planned to bring the Emerald Archer to the big screen with a similar storyline. Chances are that even if we get a Green Lantern Movie, it won’t be Supermax.

11 Cancelled: Tim Burton’s Catwoman

One of the casualties of not having Tim Burton direct Batman Continues is that Burton’s proposed Catwoman flick was done for as well. According to Film Review magazine, the script was by Daniel Waters (Batman Returns) and had a unique premise.

After getting her clock cleaned in Batman Returns, Selina had amnesia and heads to Oasisburg (a resort area akin to Las Vegas). The city is run by superheroes, and the movie was going to poke fun a lot of male hero tropes. Since none of them would have been very good, Selina would have found her way back into her slinky leather catsuit.

10 Still Could Be Made: Batman Vs. Superman

No, not the 853-hour long director’s cut of Zack Snyder’s Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn Of Justice. That director’s cut, by the way, makes a lot more sense than the theatrical version. Years before this movie, was another proposed Batman / Superman movie, this one directed by Wolfgang Petersen.

Andrew Kevin Walker (Se7en) had written the original script, which had taken place in an early-post 9/11 world. Superman had helped to stop a criminal act that would have been revealed to be committed by the Joker, bringing Supes to Gotham and meeting Batman for the first time.

9 Still Could Be Made: Green Lantern Corps

Many including Ryan Reynolds himself are not fans of 2011’s Green Lantern. While not a great film per se, it was far better than a lot of other comic book dreck out there. Any and all Green Lanterns are generally regarded as some of DC’s most beloved characters. The past few years have introduced more color rings and other Lantern Corps.

The entire series is rife for years and years of space opera action epics. The characters deserve far better than they got. If done right, there could be Green Lantern movies and an entire shared universe of its own for years.

8 Canceled: Justice League 2

While it was received better than the first two Snyder Superman flicks, Justice League still didn’t hit the expected marks that Warner Bros. had assumed it would. Very much like the rest of Snyder’s planned DCEU adventures, Justice League 2 has been shelved. By all accounts, completely abandoned.

The film would have in theory not only introduced Darkseid (DC’s version of Thanos), but also start bringing Batman’s nightmare from BVS to the forefront, and eventually the DC Injustice video game storyline.

7 Still Could Be Made: Lobo

Born on the Utopian planet of Czarnia, Lobo eliminated everyone else on his planet. His name roughly translates to “he who devours your entrails and thoroughly enjoys it.” Lobo is DC’s wildest superhero. At one point, their most popular too. Guy Ritchie was attached to bring the Last Czarnian to theaters in 2009.

After he departed, Dwayne Johnson stepped in to play the alien anti-hero biker. But he and director Brad Peyton also left the movie. The character will be seen during this second season of Krypton. Hopefully, he’ll generate enough popularity on TV to finally warrant the big screen treatment.

6 Canceled: Zatanna

Magic exists big time in the DC Universe in the form of Zatanna. The sorceress has been seen on Smallville, played by Serinda Swan. In 2005, Hadley Davis claimed she had written an action–comedy treatment for Zatanna, but that was about it.

DC might have given up on Davis’ treatment, but not Zatanna Zatara. She’s currently on the docket as one of the characters in the proposed Justice League Dark film. The team, which also includes Constantine and Deadman, are tasked with handling the more supernatural elements of the DCU.

5 Still Could Be Made: Hawkman

Another alien superhero, Hawkman has all types of strange origin stories. All of the Hawkmen of the DCU use Nth Metal to allow them to fly. The two most popular incarnations are Katar Hol and Carter Hall. One is an alien from Thanagar, the other a descendant of ancient Egypt.

In 2011, Warner Bros. was looking for writers to try and (no pun intended) get this thing off the ground. But in the years since, any proposed project featuring the Thanagar race in the DCEU has been scrapped. But the right team can still bring this story to light in the new-look, seemingly anything goes and nothing’s connected DCEU.

4 Canceled: Jack Black’s Green Lantern

For anyone that feels like Ryan Reynolds as Green Lantern was utterly terrible, take a deep breath, say to yourself “it really wasn’t that bad,” and be thankful that we don’t live in a world when Jack Black’s Green Lantern is a thing.

In the movie, the GL ring would have malfunctioned on its way to finding someone worthy and instead find Black instead. In a fit of rage, fans spoke up via the internet and were successful demanding this movie not be made.

3 Still Could Be Made: Flashpoint

Another victim of Warned Bros. reshuffling the deck on the DCEU, Flashpoint was canceled. While a movie is still being worked on, the original plan to introduce the alternate version of the DCU where Flash stops his mother’s slaying, sparking all kinds of changes has been scrapped. Which is a shame.

All of the various multiverses and alternate universes that exist in the DCU could have been introduced without harming any actual continuity that the DCEU was trying to create. Plus, seeing Jeffrey Dean Morgan as Batman would have been pretty cool.

2 Canceled: Cyborg

Cyborg has been one of the more popular members of the JLA and Teen Titans for several years now. Played in Justice League by Ray Fisher, he had the struggling young-adult trying to adjust to his powers vibe down pat.

Not only did the DCEU falling create a casualty out of Cyborg, Fisher himself once explained that making a live-action Cyborg movie would be way more expensive than Warner Bros. would be willing to pay for.

1 Still Could Be Made: Y: The Last Man

Ok, so Y: The Last Man doesn’t technically exist in the DCU proper, but the story has always been acclaimed among fans and critics alike. The series told the story of Yoric and his pet monkey, Ampersand. Yorick wakes up one day to find out that a plague wiped out seemingly all of the men on the planet except for him and his capuchin.

At one point, Shia LeBeouf was getting set to star. But his star faded and the comic book series adaptation faded as well. Until recently – while not on the big screen, FX recently ordered the series, starring Barry Keoghan (Dunkirk) set to play Yorick.


2019-04-17 08:04:21

Eric Rhodes

BioWare’s Canceled Dragon Age Was Exactly What The Studio Needed

It’s no secret that BioWare is in rough shape when it comes to reputation. Just a few years ago, the common perception of the studio was that it could do little wrong; even Mass Effect 3, complaints of a paint-by-numbers ending notwithstanding, was considered a great RPG that innovated and managed to deliver a satisfying adventure for characters that had persisted over several years and stories. Sure, Mass Effect: Andromeda was pretty bad to start, but ultimately a lot of people have come around on the game now that some patches have been implemented and, perhaps more crucially, they’ve seen how awful things can really be. There isn’t a lot of good to be found in Anthem currently, but at the very least, it’s a useful historical example to point to whenever someone wants to suggest that something could be worse by comparison.

Things didn’t have to be this way. A new report from Kotaku emerged earlier that detailed the canceled Dragon Age game that gave way to Anthem, and it’s an eye-opening experience. Not only did that Dragon Age title sound like the exact sort of game BioWare is known for making and making well, it’s also clear evidence that the studio had learned from the setbacks Dragon Age: Inquisition had experienced. The game was scrapped because Anthem was doing so poorly in development but, with the benefit of retrospect, that clearly wasn’t the right call, and the canceled Dragon Age project was exactly the game BioWare desperately needs to bounce back from the disappointment that has colored the past few years.

Related: Dragon Age 4: The Best Theories About The Dread Wolf Rises

According to Kotaku, the canceled Dragon Age game was described by a former BioWare developer as a “hugely reactive game, smaller in scope than Dragon Age: Inquisition” but with more attention paid to player choice and consequence. The game was set in the Tevinter Imperium, the wizard-ruled country that is situated at the northern tip of the main continent of Thedas. Players would gain control of a group of spies that would navigate smaller areas and plan heists. The game was ready-made to continue the story that the Dragon Age: Inquisition Trespasser DLC had started, with a built-in villain ready to go and the Dread Wolf reveal maintaining the kind of impact that narrative beat deserved. In short, it was exactly the kind of Dragon Age adventure that fans wanted, and it sounded like it had learned from Inquisition in a way that would have blended that game’s strengths into a new set of innovations to shore up its weaknesses.

The canceled Dragon Age game played to BioWare’s strengths. It was inherently a single-player adventure that emphasized narrative and choice, two elements that have characterized the most successful titles the studio has released to date. It would have been a breath of fresh air when compared to Destiny 2The Division 2, and others, rather than Anthem‘s stale riff on the genre. More importantly, it would have been an affirmation of EA’s intent to let BioWare continue to make the game’s that had made the studio famous in the first place.

Unfortunately, though, that never happened. It’s too early to tell what we’ll be getting instead, although it will definitely have a live service component, which seems to be something of a mandate for EA-owned games now. Instead of getting the evolution of a series that fans were literally willing to support by buying another game—there was a movement among Dragon Age fans to purchase Anthem as a “crowdfunding” measure for getting a new Dragon Age title—we’ll be getting a much larger overhaul. While the franchise is no stranger to that, the disappointing thing is that it sounds like BioWare had completely figured out the right direction for the series. There was motivation, clear intent to craft a story that made sense with the gameplay being pitched, and pre-existing assets in the Frostbite Engine that would make production easier. By all accounts, that sounds like the exact sort of title that could get people excited about BioWare again.

Instead, it looks like another studio under the EA umbrella is suffering under its shadow. That isn’t to say it’s entirely EA’s fault that BioWare wasn’t able to make the canceled Dragon Age game a reality, but rather that the partnership is clearly draining both parties: EA of resources, and BioWare of the “magic” that used to characterize the studio’s most exciting projects. BioWare is an equal contributor to the problem, with reports circulating about how difficult it has been to work there over the past several years and a string of unsuccessful games that have to be more than just the Frostbite Engine’s fault.

Still, it isn’t hard to imagine a different timeline where EA doesn’t force BioWare to scramble to put out other fires. The canceled Dragon Age game continues through development, buoying the studio through the difficult Andromeda and Anthem launches. Fans of a series that desperately needs another good entry would be sated, and the reputation of BioWare would still be preserved through at least one of its IPs. To put it in terminology from a property EA perhaps has more familiarity with: BioWare could’ve used the lay-up of a classic, well-made BioWare-style game, but EA didn’t even let the studio take the shot. Now, both companies are worse off, and the canceled Dragon Age game will live on in the memory of fans only. We won’t write off the upcoming Dragon Age 4 game yet, but it’s still early in development, and BioWare could really use a game like it right now instead.

More: Dragon Age 4 Is Still Years Away

Source: Kotaku


2019-04-09 01:04:58

Cody Gravelle

BioWare’s Canceled Dragon Age Was Exactly What The Studio Needed

It’s no secret that BioWare is in rough shape when it comes to reputation. Just a few years ago, the common perception of the studio was that it could do little wrong; even Mass Effect 3, complaints of a paint-by-numbers ending notwithstanding, was considered a great RPG that innovated and managed to deliver a satisfying adventure for characters that had persisted over several years and stories. Sure, Mass Effect: Andromeda was pretty bad to start, but ultimately a lot of people have come around on the game now that some patches have been implemented and, perhaps more crucially, they’ve seen how awful things can really be. There isn’t a lot of good to be found in Anthem currently, but at the very least, it’s a useful historical example to point to whenever someone wants to suggest that something could be worse by comparison.

Things didn’t have to be this way. A new report from Kotaku emerged earlier that detailed the canceled Dragon Age game that gave way to Anthem, and it’s an eye-opening experience. Not only did that Dragon Age title sound like the exact sort of game BioWare is known for making and making well, it’s also clear evidence that the studio had learned from the setbacks Dragon Age: Inquisition had experienced. The game was scrapped because Anthem was doing so poorly in development but, with the benefit of retrospect, that clearly wasn’t the right call, and the canceled Dragon Age project was exactly the game BioWare desperately needs to bounce back from the disappointment that has colored the past few years.

Related: Dragon Age 4: The Best Theories About The Dread Wolf Rises

According to Kotaku, the canceled Dragon Age game was described by a former BioWare developer as a “hugely reactive game, smaller in scope than Dragon Age: Inquisition” but with more attention paid to player choice and consequence. The game was set in the Tevinter Imperium, the wizard-ruled country that is situated at the northern tip of the main continent of Thedas. Players would gain control of a group of spies that would navigate smaller areas and plan heists. The game was ready-made to continue the story that the Dragon Age: Inquisition Trespasser DLC had started, with a built-in villain ready to go and the Dread Wolf reveal maintaining the kind of impact that narrative beat deserved. In short, it was exactly the kind of Dragon Age adventure that fans wanted, and it sounded like it had learned from Inquisition in a way that would have blended that game’s strengths into a new set of innovations to shore up its weaknesses.

The canceled Dragon Age game played to BioWare’s strengths. It was inherently a single-player adventure that emphasized narrative and choice, two elements that have characterized the most successful titles the studio has released to date. It would have been a breath of fresh air when compared to Destiny 2The Division 2, and others, rather than Anthem‘s stale riff on the genre. More importantly, it would have been an affirmation of EA’s intent to let BioWare continue to make the game’s that had made the studio famous in the first place.

Unfortunately, though, that never happened. It’s too early to tell what we’ll be getting instead, although it will definitely have a live service component, which seems to be something of a mandate for EA-owned games now. Instead of getting the evolution of a series that fans were literally willing to support by buying another game—there was a movement among Dragon Age fans to purchase Anthem as a “crowdfunding” measure for getting a new Dragon Age title—we’ll be getting a much larger overhaul. While the franchise is no stranger to that, the disappointing thing is that it sounds like BioWare had completely figured out the right direction for the series. There was motivation, clear intent to craft a story that made sense with the gameplay being pitched, and pre-existing assets in the Frostbite Engine that would make production easier. By all accounts, that sounds like the exact sort of title that could get people excited about BioWare again.

Instead, it looks like another studio under the EA umbrella is suffering under its shadow. That isn’t to say it’s entirely EA’s fault that BioWare wasn’t able to make the canceled Dragon Age game a reality, but rather that the partnership is clearly draining both parties: EA of resources, and BioWare of the “magic” that used to characterize the studio’s most exciting projects. BioWare is an equal contributor to the problem, with reports circulating about how difficult it has been to work there over the past several years and a string of unsuccessful games that have to be more than just the Frostbite Engine’s fault.

Still, it isn’t hard to imagine a different timeline where EA doesn’t force BioWare to scramble to put out other fires. The canceled Dragon Age game continues through development, buoying the studio through the difficult Andromeda and Anthem launches. Fans of a series that desperately needs another good entry would be sated, and the reputation of BioWare would still be preserved through at least one of its IPs. To put it in terminology from a property EA perhaps has more familiarity with: BioWare could’ve used the lay-up of a classic, well-made BioWare-style game, but EA didn’t even let the studio take the shot. Now, both companies are worse off, and the canceled Dragon Age game will live on in the memory of fans only. We won’t write off the upcoming Dragon Age 4 game yet, but it’s still early in development, and BioWare could really use a game like it right now instead.

More: Dragon Age 4 Is Still Years Away

Source: Kotaku


2019-04-09 01:04:58

Cody Gravelle

BioWare’s Canceled Dragon Age Was Exactly What The Studio Needed

It’s no secret that BioWare is in rough shape when it comes to reputation. Just a few years ago, the common perception of the studio was that it could do little wrong; even Mass Effect 3, complaints of a paint-by-numbers ending notwithstanding, was considered a great RPG that innovated and managed to deliver a satisfying adventure for characters that had persisted over several years and stories. Sure, Mass Effect: Andromeda was pretty bad to start, but ultimately a lot of people have come around on the game now that some patches have been implemented and, perhaps more crucially, they’ve seen how awful things can really be. There isn’t a lot of good to be found in Anthem currently, but at the very least, it’s a useful historical example to point to whenever someone wants to suggest that something could be worse by comparison.

Things didn’t have to be this way. A new report from Kotaku emerged earlier that detailed the canceled Dragon Age game that gave way to Anthem, and it’s an eye-opening experience. Not only did that Dragon Age title sound like the exact sort of game BioWare is known for making and making well, it’s also clear evidence that the studio had learned from the setbacks Dragon Age: Inquisition had experienced. The game was scrapped because Anthem was doing so poorly in development but, with the benefit of retrospect, that clearly wasn’t the right call, and the canceled Dragon Age project was exactly the game BioWare desperately needs to bounce back from the disappointment that has colored the past few years.

Related: Dragon Age 4: The Best Theories About The Dread Wolf Rises

According to Kotaku, the canceled Dragon Age game was described by a former BioWare developer as a “hugely reactive game, smaller in scope than Dragon Age: Inquisition” but with more attention paid to player choice and consequence. The game was set in the Tevinter Imperium, the wizard-ruled country that is situated at the northern tip of the main continent of Thedas. Players would gain control of a group of spies that would navigate smaller areas and plan heists. The game was ready-made to continue the story that the Dragon Age: Inquisition Trespasser DLC had started, with a built-in villain ready to go and the Dread Wolf reveal maintaining the kind of impact that narrative beat deserved. In short, it was exactly the kind of Dragon Age adventure that fans wanted, and it sounded like it had learned from Inquisition in a way that would have blended that game’s strengths into a new set of innovations to shore up its weaknesses.

The canceled Dragon Age game played to BioWare’s strengths. It was inherently a single-player adventure that emphasized narrative and choice, two elements that have characterized the most successful titles the studio has released to date. It would have been a breath of fresh air when compared to Destiny 2The Division 2, and others, rather than Anthem‘s stale riff on the genre. More importantly, it would have been an affirmation of EA’s intent to let BioWare continue to make the game’s that had made the studio famous in the first place.

Unfortunately, though, that never happened. It’s too early to tell what we’ll be getting instead, although it will definitely have a live service component, which seems to be something of a mandate for EA-owned games now. Instead of getting the evolution of a series that fans were literally willing to support by buying another game—there was a movement among Dragon Age fans to purchase Anthem as a “crowdfunding” measure for getting a new Dragon Age title—we’ll be getting a much larger overhaul. While the franchise is no stranger to that, the disappointing thing is that it sounds like BioWare had completely figured out the right direction for the series. There was motivation, clear intent to craft a story that made sense with the gameplay being pitched, and pre-existing assets in the Frostbite Engine that would make production easier. By all accounts, that sounds like the exact sort of title that could get people excited about BioWare again.

Instead, it looks like another studio under the EA umbrella is suffering under its shadow. That isn’t to say it’s entirely EA’s fault that BioWare wasn’t able to make the canceled Dragon Age game a reality, but rather that the partnership is clearly draining both parties: EA of resources, and BioWare of the “magic” that used to characterize the studio’s most exciting projects. BioWare is an equal contributor to the problem, with reports circulating about how difficult it has been to work there over the past several years and a string of unsuccessful games that have to be more than just the Frostbite Engine’s fault.

Still, it isn’t hard to imagine a different timeline where EA doesn’t force BioWare to scramble to put out other fires. The canceled Dragon Age game continues through development, buoying the studio through the difficult Andromeda and Anthem launches. Fans of a series that desperately needs another good entry would be sated, and the reputation of BioWare would still be preserved through at least one of its IPs. To put it in terminology from a property EA perhaps has more familiarity with: BioWare could’ve used the lay-up of a classic, well-made BioWare-style game, but EA didn’t even let the studio take the shot. Now, both companies are worse off, and the canceled Dragon Age game will live on in the memory of fans only. We won’t write off the upcoming Dragon Age 4 game yet, but it’s still early in development, and BioWare could really use a game like it right now instead.

More: Dragon Age 4 Is Still Years Away

Source: Kotaku


2019-04-09 01:04:58

Cody Gravelle

Grey’s Anatomy: 15 Canceled Storylines That Would Have Saved The Show (And 10 That Would Have Hurt It)

After Grey’s Anatomy’s fifteenth season, it became the longest-running medical drama in television history. The show that had started out following Meredith Grey as an intern at Seattle Grace Hospital is currently unchallenged in this regard. Meredith is no longer an intern struggling with the romances and pitfalls of a surgeon-in-training’s life. She is head of general surgery now. Though, yes, we suppose she is still dealing with the romances and pitfalls of a surgeon’s life.

After fifteen seasons jam-packed with drama, Grey’s Anatomy has become an ocean of tragic storylines you have to navigate through. Initially, these moments drew you in, but after a series of serious events, the show’s realism has taken a nosedive. How many bad things can happen to one hospital? As you continue to watch the show, a part of you wonders where the show can go from here and if, perhaps, it should have done something different along the way.

Many canceled storylines and plot points exist for Grey’s Anatomy. These are ideas that the showrunner Shonda Rhimes had that were not used or were altered slightly to better fit in with things like the production schedule. After reading through these unused story bits, you might feel as if Grey’s Anatomy could have definitely used those storylines to improve the show. Conversely, you might also feel immensely relieved that some of those storylines never saw the light of day. Read on if you want to learn about forgotten storylines that would have either helped or hurt Grey’s Anatomy. 

25 Would Have Saved: Meredith And Derek Remaining Childless

By this latest season, Meredith is the proud mother of three children. However, this was not originally her intended future. When Meredith and Derek were first building the solid foundations of their relationship (not during that time period of will-they/won’t-they), the possibility of them having children was remote.

Instead, Rhimes believed Meredith should spend time focusing on her career.

Clearly, Meredith juggles having a successful career while being a caring mother in these current seasons. However, we believe having Meredith and Derek remain childless would have helped the show focus more on surgery and atypical marriages rather than taking the easy way forward.

24 Would Have Saved: Lexie Becoming The Main Character

Before you chew us out for even considering the notion of replacing Meredith, just hear us out. Lexie Grey was introduced to viewers of the show in the fourth season. She was Meredith’s half-sister. If, for some reason, Ellen Pompeo was unable to return to the show, Lexie would have been able to pick up the reins while still having the title of the show remain relevant.

Say what you will, but that would have been one daring move for the show to make. It would have taken the show in an entirely new direction, maybe even giving it a much-needed breath of fresh air.

23 Would Have Hurt: If The Doctors Were Smokers

It goes without saying that having a serious medical drama with doctors who frequently smoke would have hurt the show. Smoking and health care do not go hand in hand. But apparently, there were plans in the works for the doctors of Seattle Grace Hospital to be big smokers.

Most notably among them, Meredith Grey would have been puffing quite often. The cancellation of this bit of the story is a godsend. The show would have made itself a hypocritical mess, and viewers would have been left wondering how these doctors could call themselves “doctors.”

22 Would Have Saved: Preston Burke Having A Wife

Preston Burke was initially going to have a wife that Cristina Yang would have had to contend with. This definitely would have upped the ante when it came to the “forbidden” nature of their relationship. It would have been a more dire case than a superior having relations with a subordinate.

Plus, it would have tied into Burke being a less-than-estimable person later on. However, this storyline was ultimately never used. As a consolation, this plot shifted over to Meredith and Derek instead, so at least we got to see it in some way.

21 Would Have Saved: Arizona Seeing Callie Before Leaving

Actors come and go from shows. It’s not the show’s fault when that happens. However, it is absolutely hilarious when shows come up with reasons for why their characters have to suddenly stop showing up. Callie Torres was one of the lucky ones. She just decided to move to New York after breaking up with her wife, Arizona Robbins.

Arizona, on the other hand, left the show without rationality.

She decides to pack up everything and move back with Callie without having seen her at least once in person since they separated. A canceled storyline would have had the two reunite once before they both departed, but alas, that was not to be, and Arizona left Seattle without any physical reassurance from her former wife.

20 Would Have Hurt: The Show Being Set In Chicago

Granted, this is not exactly a canceled storyline, but this change would have altered the story drastically. Before settling on Seattle, Washington as the location for her show, Shonda Rhimes considered placing her story in Chicago.

Like Seattle, Chicago is a bustling city and would have seen the interns of the hospital living marginally the same lifestyles. However, not only would it have mimicked the setting from the show ER, Grey’s Anatomy would have been unable to include several important storylines down the road. The ferry incident, for example, would never have happened.

19 Would Have Saved: Izzie Returning To The Hospital

Conflicts with the actress who played her aside, Izzie Stevens was an important part of the Grey’s Anatomy series. She was one of the original interns that Meredith entered the hospital with, and her struggles with patient care and a bout of cancer made up a huge part of the story.

There were talks of her returning to the show, but these talks fell through and it never happened. At this point, after several seasons without her, Izzie’s return would feel odd. However, if it could have happened naturally, it would have been an in-character move.

18 Would Have Saved: Derek And Addison Having A Teenage Daughter

Think of the drama that would have occurred if Derek and Addison had had a teenage daughter. That would have placed Meredith in even more of a dilemma than she was in when she found out Derek was married. She would have to contend with dating someone who lied to her about an entire family.

And the poor daughter would have had to deal with her mother cheating on her father and her father cheating on her mother. Holy moly, there was so much missed potential from that canceled plot complication. Derek would have seemed like a jerk-wad at the end of it. Huh. Maybe that’s why the showrunners didn’t go for that storyline.

17 Would Have Hurt: Addison Leaving So Soon

Addison’s arrival on the show spelled doom for Meredith and Derek’s relationship. It seemed par for the course that fans of their relationship would loathe Addison. However, Addison became a beloved character in her own right. She earned her way into the hearts of viewers with her no-nonsense attitude and relatable sense of judgment.

We are truly thankful that her departure from the show was delayed. The original storyline would have seen her leave after a few episodes. But because she stayed, we got to know one of the best characters Grey’s Anatomy has to offer.

16 Would Have Saved: Cristina’s Father Becoming A Donor For The Hospital

One storyline Shonda Rhimes had planned for Grey’s Anatomy was a conflict regarding Cristina’s father. Cristina Yang’s dad was set up to be a major donor for Seattle Grace Hospital. That would have meant he would have had a lot of influence on what goes on in the hospital.

This sets up Cristina to potentially be loathed by her fellow interns. Unfortunately, this storyline never happened. It would have been interesting to see Cristina, a talented surgeon regardless of any favoritism, deal with the looming specter of her father hovering around her actions.

15 Would Have Saved: April Leaving After Being Fired

April Kepner was fired from the hospital after a pretty riveting episode regarding patient care gone wrong. This decision should have heralded the end of her time on the show. However, this choice was later reversed when Derek Shepherd, as the new Chief of Surgery, hired her back.

The original storyline would have worked better for Grey’s Anatomy. It would have shown real consequences for failing to address a patient properly. April’s mistake was fatal, but thanks to the storyline that eventually followed her firing, she never truly learned from it.

14 Would Have Hurt: Bailey Being Small And Blonde

We all know and love Miranda Bailey for the character she is. She is the strong mentor to Meredith and her fellow interns during the first few seasons of Grey’s Anatomy, and she is now the Chief of Surgery at the Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital. We can’t imagine her being any other way.

However, during her initial conception, Bailey was described as being small and blonde, which is the exact opposite of what she is. Thankfully, this image of Bailey was scrapped, and we have the Bailey that we have today.

13 Would Have Saved: Witnessing George’s Last Day

George O’Malley’s sacrifice that led to his passing sounded like a heart-wrenching moment. Unfortunately, we never got to see it. There was a potential storyline that would have followed George during his final moments, allowing viewers to see his last day in its entirety, but it was ultimately canceled.

If this storyline had been included, the impact of George’s demise would have hit fans that much harder. Instead, it’s as if the bus that wiped out George’s life also erased his presence on the show forever after.

12 Would Have Saved: Cristina Not Having Her Baby

Cristina learned she had an unwanted pregnancy very early on in the show. If Shonda Rhimes had had her way, she would have had our favorite and most ambitious intern deal with one of the most intense decisions of her life. This idea discomfited network executives, and instead, Cristina lost the baby due to an ectopic pregnancy.

Grey’s Anatomy would have benefited from Cristina taking matters into her own hands. The issue would have been divisive, yes, but it would have challenged viewers to consider their own perspectives. It would have furthered the discussion, and made for a fascinating piece of television history.

11 Would Have Hurt: George’s Romance With Bailey

If you have never seen Grey’s Anatomy, then seeing the words “George has a romance with Bailey” should have no effect on you whatsoever. If you have seen the show, then you are wincing at the mere utterance of those words. In no way, shape, or form, can any fan of the show picture a romance between George and Bailey. It runs counter to these two characters’ personalities.

However, this storyline was almost a reality. Thank the sun and the stars that this storyline did not see the light of day. It would have been a disaster of soap opera-ish proportions.

10 Would Have Hurt: Cristina Not Having Her Breakdown

Cristina Yang is not a typically emotional person. Her career defines who she is, and she won’t let pesky things like emotions get in the way. So when it came time for an emotional upheaval to occur in Cristina’s life, you can bet her nervous breakdown was spectacular.

This moment in the story almost did not happen. It occurred based on the inspiration of actress Sandra Oh. She suggested the scene take place. Without that scene, Cristina’s development as a character would not have been nearly so interesting afterward as it was.

9 Would Have Saved: Meredith Remaining Single After Derek

It took a while for Meredith to move on after Derek passed (well, “a while” by Grey’s Anatomy standards), but afterward, she moved on to pursue other men. Now, we’re not saying Meredith should have remained grieving over Derek for the rest of her life, but the concept that she stay single makes for a more interesting story.

For one thing, the show hyped up her and Derek’s relationship so much, it feels off for her to move on to another person. For another, Meredith’s storyline could have focused on other concerns aside from romance.

8 Would Have Saved: Alex Karev Missing From Pilot

Before getting lambasted for suggesting this, bear in mind that we are suggesting this storyline only for the pilot episode of Grey’s Anatomy. Initially, there were no plans to include Alex Karev as a character in the pilot episode. He was added in as an afterthought.

Since Karev is now one of the few remaining characters from the original cast, it feels as if he deserved more than simply being tacked onto the first episode. Imagine if, instead of being added to the pilot at the last minute, he was given a heartier introduction in a later episode.

7 Would Have Hurt: Meredith Dating Burke

Cristina and Meredith’s respective romances with Preston Burke and Derek Shepherd are integral parts of the show’s history. It is difficult to picture a world where those romances did not take place. It is even more difficult to picture a world where Meredith ended up with Burke instead of Shepherd.

Somewhere, in some alternate reality, there exists a world where that is the case. One of Shonda Rhimes’ initial storylines for Grey’s Anatomy would have seen Meredith dating Burke. We’re glad that adjustments were made.

6 Would Have Saved: Erica Hahn Staying With Callie

Callie’s first big relationship with another woman was when she started dating cardiologist Erica Hahn. Their relationship, despite outcries against it, was one of the highlights of the show.

However, it felt as if it had barely begun before Brooke Smith, the actress who plays Hahn, was let go. Any plans for storylines regarding her and Callie were nixed after that. If Hahn had stayed on, even if her relationship with Callie declined, the show would have benefited from having such a relationship on the screen.

5 Would Have Hurt: Cristine Falling In Love With Denny

Izzie’s romance with patient Denny Duquette was a turning point for her character. Despite all the drama that was going on with Meredith and her love life, Izzie and Denny managed to steal the show. This storyline would have been ruined if, instead of Izzie falling for Denny, it was Cristina Yang falling in love with Denny.

Just saying that sentence out loud sounds strange; we can’t even imagine what it would be like to actually see that storyline acted out. Knowing what we know about Cristina’s personality, a romance between her and Denny would be impossible.

4 Would Have Saved: Meredith Getting Pregnant In The Sixth Season

Once the decision was made to have Meredith be a mother, there was nothing for it but to plow straight through with this storyline. However, real-life actress Ellen Pompeo was pregnant during the time of filming for Grey’s Anatomy’s sixth season, before her character had her kids.

Instead of having her get pregnant then and there, the showrunners decided to conceal her pregnancy at that point in time instead of conveniently using it. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking this route. It just would have been perfect timing if Meredith Grey had been ready for kids at the same time as the actress playing her.

3 Would Have Hurt: Mark Surviving The Plane Crash

McSteamy fans around the planet will hate us for saying so, but it was a good thing that Mark Sloan perished from his injuries shortly after escaping the plane crash. One of the loves of his life, Lexie Grey, had met her end during the crash. What was Mark supposed to do if he had survived?

One canceled storyline saw him leaving Seattle to go live with Addison. This move would have been so out of character, it is a good thing the showrunners abandoned it. It’s tragic, but it is an overall better outcome for the story that Mark Sloan passed away, too.

2 Would Have Saved: Meredith Leaving The Show

Meredith is the star of Grey’s Anatomy. The show would be a different beast without her. However, if Ellen Pompeo were to leave the show, as heartbreaking as that would be for all of us, it might revitalize the show’s story.

After spending more than fifteen seasons in this hospital, practically all narrative possibilities have been exhausted with Meredith. Some of the worst things in the world have happened to her, and some of the best have happened to her as well. If she were to leave, the show would alter drastically. However, change isn’t always a bad thing.

1 Would Have Hurt: Derek Walking Out On Meredith

Just as with Mark Sloan, the storyline the showrunners went with for Derek Shepherd’s passing was ultimately the best decision for the character. Now, some might moan and complain that the show should not have canceled Derek’s chances for survival.

However, if actor Patrick Dempsey was set on leaving the show, Derek needed a plausible reason for no longer being around. Quite frankly, any outcome that has Derek surviving yet remaining apart from his wife and children makes absolutely no sense. The showrunners did right on this with the hand they were dealt.


2019-04-07 06:04:55

Amanda Hurych

Amy Hennig’s Canceled Star Wars Game Would Have Been Like The Films

Amy Hennig’s canceled Star Wars game sounds like it would have paid very close attention to what made the films so great before incorporating those elements into its own design. Hennig, best known for her work on the first three Uncharted games, recently stated in an interview that the now-canceled game would have prioritized an ensemble cast and story-telling to match.

EA and Visceral’s canceled Star Wars game was code-named Project Ragtag, and was being developed by the team behind Dead Space. Hennig’s role was as creative lead, a position she had previously overseen during the rise of Naughty Dog as one of the premier narratively-driven game studios in the world. Visceral’s Star Wars game was never really shown off by EA, though, and the project was canned before anyone even really knew what it was about. Later, the same thing would happen to another canceled Star Wars game, and fans began to worry that the license would never produce something meaningful again.

Related: Disney Won’t Cancel EA Star Wars License Anytime Soon

While EA’s Star Wars license remains a hot topic for fans, it seems like the publisher was close to yielding a game that would have helped improve its standing within the community. During an interview with IGN, Hennig stated she had big plans for the game, some of which included paying closer attention to what made the films such an enduring and beloved element of the multimedia juggernaut. Here’s what Hennig had to say regarding the game’s structure and story:

You look at Indiana Jones, he’s the protagonist. The other characters are side characters. They’re important, but they’re not co-protagonists. In Star Wars, those are ensemble stories, all of them. If you didn’t do that in a Star Wars game that was meant to feel like a Star Wars movie, something would feel off.

Hennig’s use of Indiana Jones as a comparison point is intentional, as she also stated her vision of the game would be pretty close to the serialized adventures of the character made famous by Harrison Ford with one key difference, that being the ensemble cast. Hennig noted that the characters in the canceled Star Wars game would have been much more improvisational, giving the example of Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, and Chewbacca figuring out disguises on the fly while rescuing Leia as a taste of what that might look like. Improvisation was meant to be a fully-fledged game mechanic, which sounds as though the title would’ve had a lot of branching paths available, alongside a much more thematically-consistent take on the classic Star Wars adventure.

Unfortunately, Visceral and Hennig’s canceled Star Wars game will never see the light of day. There’s a chance that some of it may be salvaged for the upcoming Jedi Fallen Order, but Hennig won’t be involved, which is a shame. Although she’s currently taking a break, Hennig sounds like she has a great vision for the future of Star Wars video games, and we’re currently at a point where fans need a ray of hope soon. Maybe things will break in such a way that EA has to improvise and bring in Hennig to finish a different Star Wars title but, until then, we just have to fantasize about what could have been.

More: Why EA’s Open-World Star Wars Game Was Canceled (Again)

Source: IGN


2019-03-25 01:03:01

Cody Gravelle

Wild Hogs 2 Updates: Why Disney Canceled The Sequel

While the original 2007 biker comedy proved to be a surprise smash hit, Wild Hogs 2: Bachelor Ride was eventually canceled – here’s why the sequel didn’t happen. Wild Hogs starred John Travolta, Martin Lawrence, William H. Macy, and Tim Allen as four middle-aged friends who set off on a road trip adventure before finding themselves in trouble with an infamous biker gang, led by Ray Liotta (Goodfellas). While Wild Hogs received almost universally negative reviews, the film would gross over $250 million during its theatrical run and would do tidy business on DVD also.

Wild Hogs also beat David Fincher’s acclaimed thriller Zodiac at the box-office, so while critics might have hated it, it clearly struck a chord with audiences. It came as little surprise when Wild Hogs 2: Bachelor Ride was announced soon after, which would reunite the cast and director Walt Becker for another wacky misadventure. Despite this, Wild Hogs 2 didn’t ultimately happen, with Disney abruptly dropping the sequel in 2009 alongside several other projects.

Related: Sausage Party 2 Updates: Will The Animated Sequel Ever Happen?

Let’s explore why Wild Hogs 2: Bachelor Ride was scrapped, despite being something of a guaranteed hit.

Old Dogs Doomed Wild Hogs 2

John Travolta soon reunited with Wild Hogs helmer Walt Becker for Old Dogs, a family movie co-starring Robin Williams. This labored 2009 comedy received even worse reviews than Wild Hogs did and while the movie was a modest success, its box-office take proved disappointing to Disney.

It appears the studio felt the movie’s underperformance was linked to its leading men, with Disney canceling a planned comedy called Wedding Banned that was set to star Robin Williams and Anna Faris (Overboard), and Wild Hogs 2: Bachelor Ride. The lukewarm performance of Martin Lawrence comedy College Road Trip in 2008 probably didn’t help either.

Wild Hogs 2 Didn’t Fit Disney’s Slate

Another factor that likely led to Wild Hogs 2’s cancelation is that it didn’t fit in with Disney’s slate at the time. During this era big-budget event movies like Tron: Legacy, Pirate Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides and John Carter were in development, so a modestly budgeted comedy sequel might have looked out of place.

In hindsight, Wild Hogs 2 might have been a safer bet, with John Carter later proving to be a financial dud and Tron: Legacy failing to launch a planned franchise. It’s unlikely Wild Hogs 2: Bachelor Ride would have been received much better critically than the original movie was, and while there were reports WWE Studios in 2017 were planning to resurrect the sequel, there are no signs of it moving forward.

Next: Step Brothers 2 Updates: Why The Sequel Won’t Happen


2019-03-20 05:03:00

Padraig Cotter

10 Canceled Disney Series We Hope Get a Remake

With Disney Channel‘s original and longest-running sitcom Game of Thrones coming to an end, now would be a good time to take a trip down memory lane. Oh, wait. We’ve just been informed that Game of Thrones is not the same show as Duck Tales. Joking aside, it’s crazy to think that shows like That’s So Raven and Boy Meets World have been able to return to television with successful new stories. Part of the appeal is due to the fact that the kids who’ve watched these shows have been able to grow up with these characters. Raven’s Home and Girl Meets World turned out to be huge hits, so it only makes sense that other revivals might be on the horizon. Check out the list to see which Disney shows deserve another chance!

10 Hannah Montana

Before Miley Cyrus made a living by being Robin Thicke’s ballroom dance partner, she used to play a little known character named Hannah Montana. The show was about Miley using a blonde wig in order to transform into her pop star alter ego known as Hannah Montana. However, the catch was that Miley hid her pop star identity from everyone around her. The series would always use this central conflict for its source of comedy and drama.

It’s safe to say that Hannah Montana was a cultural phenomenon when it aired on Disney from 2006-2011. Even if a person wasn’t a fan of the show, how could they not help singing along to The Best of Both Worlds? Although the majority of the show’s plot threads were wrapped up in its final season, the mark it made on pop culture is still relevant to this day. Taking into account how wildly different Miley Cyrus’ career is today than it was so many years ago, it would be incredibly interesting to see her return to the character that made her a superstar. If nothing else, we all just need another excuse to sing along to the show’s theme song.

9 Wizards of Waverly Place

Imagine Harry Potter, but without all the death, nose-less bad guys, and British people. One then starts to get a pretty good idea of what Wizards of Waverly Place is all about. The show centered around a young witch named Alex and her family of wizards. Considering a witch has to earn their powers in the series, the majority of the drama would focus on Alex and her siblings fighting for supremacy. There’s also a bunch of other crazy stuff that happens along the way. Alex dates a werewolf, her dad owns a boss looking sandwich shop, and there’s a character who likes to make dresses out of rubber duckies because why not.

Related: Selena Gomez Touches On the Controversy of 13 Reasons Why

At the time rumors set Hollywood ablaze that J.K. Rowling went super agro when she found out that some other show had beat her to the punch for the idea of a muggle character that likes to wear rubber ducky dresses. That rumor is completely bogus and everyone should immediately erase it from their memory. False reports aside, what’s completely accurate information is that this series made Selena Gomez a household name. The show was also able to tap into the popularity of the mid-2,000’s fantasy craze in an extremely clever way. Great comedy and fantasy are timeless. So, it only makes sense that a concept as timeless as Wizards of Waverly Place should return to grace our screens.

8 Kim Possible

Kim Possible should be applauded for convincing audiences that naked mole rats may actually be adorable. Considered a classic by people who shop at BoxLunch (i.e., millennials), Kim Possible aired on the Disney Channel from 2002-2008. The show followed the adventures of the titular Kim Possible as she balanced high school life while being an international crime fighter. A goofy, but lovable boy named Ron Stoppable would always join Kim on her missions. The characters were aided by their naked mole rat sidekick, Rufus.

The show was sort of an anomaly within children’s animation in that it featured a lean order of eighty-six episodes over the course of its five-year run. It focused on producing quality rather than quantity. Moreover, what made the show click with viewers is that Kim was an incredibly relatable character. Although her life as a vigilante was outlandish, her high school experiences, on the other hand, were full of situations everyone had gone through at least once in their life. Kim had homework, parents, and potential boyfriends to deal with. A live-action adaptation of the series was recently made for the Disney Channel. However, there’s no doubt audiences would like to see Kim Possible back in its original animated form.

7 Phil of the Future

Phil of the Future proves that hairstyles from 2121 don’t look much different than they did in 2004. The sitcom centered around Phil Diffy (Raviv Ullman) and his family being sent back in time from the 22nd century. While the family was stuck in the present day, Phil would have to try and blend in within modern society. The show’s big question focused on whether or not the Diffy family’s time machine would ever be fixed so that they could return to their home. Phil meets new friends along the way and it makes his potential departure all the more emotional.

Phil of the Future was a single-camera comedy that tried to be a little more charismatic with its creative choices. The high concept nature of the series lent itself to a lot of truly funny fish out of water gags. The show also jump-started the careers of actors like Evan Peters.

6 The Proud Family

This is the only show that’s ever used “sugar mamma” as a term of endearment. It’s sort of amazing that a series as well animated as The Proud Family was made entirely on Adobe FlashAdmittedly, the series is pretty much plotless. The story simply followed the day to day experiences of a girl named Penny Proud while she balanced both her family and school life. Every cartoon doesn’t have to contain a high concept plot in order for it to be entertaining.

What made The Proud Family so memorable was that the characters had a fairly grounded dynamic for a cartoon. The show additionally had a vibrant art design that heightened the reality of the stories. Ultimately, these elements made The Proud Family a hit for kids and adults alike. If this show turned out this good using Adobe Flash in 2001, imagine how pristine a modern update could look.

5 Lizzie McGuire

Some kids just want to get through middle school without getting shoved into a locker, but then there are girls like Lizzie McGuire who aspire to be the most popular girl in school. First airing in 2001, Lizzie McGuire launched actress Hilary Duff into immediate stardom. There was nothing too complex about the show’s premise in that it typically followed Lizzie through her high school life. What made the series stand out was that it never talked down to the intelligence of its pre-teen audience. Lizzie’s will-they-or-won’t they dating drama with her friend Gordo (Adam Lamberg) created a legitimately gripping narrative for audiences to follow episode to episode.

RELATED: Hilary Duff Teases a Possible Lizzie McGuire Revival

The show was also creatively inventive when it would occasionally use animated sequences that allowed Lizzie to talk directly to the viewers. Considering Hilary Duff’s career is still in full swing with the show Younger, Lizzie McGuire relaunch couldn’t be more relevant.

4 American Dragon: Jake Long

If anyone ever wondered what happened to Rufio (actor Dante Basco) after Hook, he became the voice of American Dragon: Jake Long. Similar to Kim Possible, the show followed a kid balancing everyday life with extraordinary circumstances. Specifically, the story centered on Jake’s ability to turn into a dragon and defend the mythical creatures living in New York City. Jake’s family possessed similar dragon powers and his grandpa acted as his mentor. What made everything more complicated was that Jake happened to be in love with a dragon hunter named Rose Killdragonosa. Talk about a red flag of a name.

Even though Jake Long only lasted two seasons, it nonetheless made a long lasting impression on its fans. The show’s balance of action, humor, and mysticism created a totally unique viewing experience. It also was a precursor to Adventure Time in that it also featured a talking dog sidekick voiced by John DiMaggio. Considering that the Disney Channel contains fewer animated programs than ever before, a Jake Long revival would be more than welcomed.

3 Disney Channel Games

Disney Channel Games was so dope. What other show could you watch Zac Efron send the Sprouse twins flopping into a dunk tank? The concept was essentially American Ninja Warrior, but for children. It was a reality-based show that had the biggest Disney Channel stars compete in kid-friendly obstacles. For example, some of the events included an inflatable obstacle course and rock-paper-scissors. The show was a blast.

Related: 25 Disney Channel Remakes That Nobody Asked For

Although the series only lasted from 2006-2008, it encapsulated how popular Disney Channel sitcoms were at the time. These programs had enough familiar faces to also star in what was ostensibly a filler show. However, this show ended up having a lot of viewers in its own right. The concept of Disney Channel Games is so harmless that we believe it could thrive in any era of television.

2 Jonas

Jonas may have had only lasted two seasons, but the image of the brothers being baked into a giant pizza will remain in our heads. Although the Jonas Brothers had been performing since 2005, the sibling group really boomed in the latter half of the decade. Some of that popularity resulted in a show simply titled Jonas.

The series was a single-camera comedy where the brothers played dramatized version of themselves. They had to deal with struggles of fame while balancing the woes of high school life. Also, the show featured original songs and music videos. The biggest shocker was that the three brothers all showcased an admirable range of comedic timing. Look, Year 3,000 was a banger in 2007 and it’s still a banger in 2019. With the Jonas Brothers making their long-awaited return in the form an upcoming album, it’s time to give Jonas the other twenty seasons it deserves.

1 The Suite Life of Zack and Cody

We can go back and forth all day arguing if The Suite Life of Zack and Cody or Suite Life on Deck is better. But, let’s get real. It’s Suite Life of Zack and Cody all day-everyday, son! This needs to be said without irony: the concept of Suite Life was kind of a stroke of genius. The show’s simple format followed twin brothers Zack and Cody (Dylan and Cole Sprouse) throughout their day to day adventures in a five-star hotel allowed for all types of stories to be told. Furthermore, this presented endless possibilities for hilarious jokes and gags. Remember the episode where Cody pretends to dress up as a beauty pageant contestant because he likes a girl? Classic stuff and that’s not up for debate.

The show also featured a lineup of all time great side characters like the salty hotel manager Mr. Moseby. Between Suite Life and Suite Life on Deck, the show was easily one of the longest running sitcoms on Disney. We know that Cole is busy running the Southside Serpents over in Riverdale, but someone needs to give that guy a call. It’s time for The Suite Life of Zack and Cody to return.

NEXT: 10 Best Inspirational Disney Movie Quotes

2019-03-14 01:03:19

Nathaniel Vanderpoort

20 Canceled TV Crossovers That Would Have Changed Everything

Crossovers are kind of the ultimate fan service. The actual story beats seldom add up, but fans are almost always excited by the prospect of their favorite characters meeting. Many of them care less about the details of how these universes wind up occupying the same space and more about just somehow seeing it happen. Every once in a while, the circumstances leading up to these epic situations make sense, but those instances are few and far between. Even still, there is something undeniably delightful in seeing your favorite fictional worlds collide.

There are certain TV shows that lend themselves to these events: Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, the Arrowverse, or Grey’s Anatomy and Private Practice come to mind. The spinoffs were created with crossover potential in mind. However, television has also seen its fair share of team-ups that were far more difficult to imagine. No one really saw a Bones/Sleepy Hollow mashup before it happened or considered The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air showing up on Blossom. The latter was a particularly strange choice if for no other reason than the fact that Will Smith had previously appeared on Blossom already–as himself.

As crazy as some of the ideas that actually made it to the small screen are, there are also plenty that didn’t even survive the pitching stage. Some of these actually wouldn’t have been all that much of a stretch, but others were far cooler in theory than they would’ve been in execution.

Her are 20 Canceled TV Crossovers That Would Have Changed Everything.

20 Smallville/Supernatural

Supernatural has proven time and again that it’s not afraid to try new things – with results ranging from amazing to awful and pretty much everywhere in between. Although the series shared little in common with Smallville, either tonally or storywise, both were successful CW shows with incredibly passionate fanbases that happened to share a network. It seems only natural that plans for a crossover were at least considered.

In typical Supernatural fashion, the pitch was not what you might think. It’s wouldn’t have been the Man of Steel that the Winchesters came across, but rather the actor who portrayed him. A curse striking down former Superman actors would lead to them to search for Tom Welling in the hopes of protecting him. It’s definitely a cool idea, but one that never wound up taking shape. Would Jensen Ackles have played Jason or Dean?

19 Riverdale/Sabrina

While it is true that a crossover between Riverdale and The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina may still happen at some point, there was initially talk of the character making her debut on the former. Back when Riverdale was still searching for its audience in season 1, the idea was to wrap up the year with Sabrina Spellman appearing as a villain. Following this development, the next season would take its cues from the more horror-oriented comic series, Afterlife with Archie.

Of course, these plans were abandoned after Riverdale found its footing. Once the series had established itself as a noir, it would’ve seemed too strange to introduce magic into that world. For the time being, Greendale and Riverdale will be remaining separate entities – but fans are keeping their fingers crossed.

18 Friends/Seinfeld

As previously mentioned, a crossover between two shows doesn’t always make much sense. Due to the immense popularity of both Seinfeld and Friends in the ’90s, their shared network of NBC had high hopes of finding an excuse to unite them for one epic event. It might’ve actually happened, if not for Seinfeld co-creator Larry David’s intense desire to make sure that it never did.

Following David’s immediate dismissal of the idea, Seinfeld writer Peter Mehlman suggested telling NBC that they were a go, on one condition: Ross wouldn’t make it through the episode alive. Although both men found the pitch hilarious, they knew that their terms would never be agreed upon. It’s probably for the best, even if many fans of both series would’ve enjoyed watching that particular story play out.

17 Game of Thrones/Westworld

Imagine being approached by George R.R. Martin himself and asked to create a crossover with Game of Thrones. That was the dilemma faced by Westworld showrunners Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy after the famed author suggested just that. Fans had been floating the idea as well; that a “Westeros World” could be eventually introduced into the other HBO series.

Of course, Nolan and Joy were incredibly flattered, but ultimately chose to pass on the idea. Joy felt that she needed to keep that world alive in her mind, dragons and all, and that incorporating Game of Thrones into Westworld could rob her of that. Viewers may be disappointed, but is there really any harm in wanting to believe that dragons are real?

16 Scrubs/Arrested Development

Fans of both shows will know that Zach Braff appeared on Arrested Development and that Jason Bateman showed up on Scrubs. Although the actors may have crossed over from one series to another, the characters did not. However, Scrubs creator Bill Lawrence and star Zach Braff had hopes of bringing Tobias Funke into Sacred Heart Hospital.

Both were huge admirers of David Cross’ work and thought that a guest spot from Tobias would be a great idea. This was long before resurrecting Arrested Development was even considered a possibility – it had only recently been canceled – and viewers likely would’ve welcomed a Tobias cameo on Scrubs. Alas, the fact that the shows were on two different networks proved too big a hurdle and the episode never came together.

15 Dark Matter/Stargate SG-1

Stargate SG-1 aired on Showtime from 1997-2002, but switched to the Sci-Fi Channel for its remaining five seasons. Dark Matter ran for three seasons – after the network had rebranded as Syfy – from 2015-2017. The co-creator of the latter (Jeff Mallozzi) had previously worked on the former, giving him an idea of how he could potentially prevent Dark Matter’s early demise.

A crossover between that series and Stargate SG-1 was meant to not only buy Dark Matter a fourth season, but also to potentially make room for new SG-1 content as well. Both would’ve aired on MGM’s streaming platform, Stargate Command. According to Mallozzi, time was not on their side and the project was ultimately undone by existing contracts.

14 Doctor Who/Harry Potter

Doctor Who has tremendous crossover potential and there was a point when it almost shared the screen with Harry Potter. Concerned that the 2008 Christmas special would not live up to the prior year’s – which had featured Kylie Minogue – former show scribe Russell T Davies offered a magical pitch. His idea: J.K. Rowling would contract some sort of space illness that caused her creations to become a reality. The good Doctor would have to find a way to once again confine them to fiction.

Rowling had previously been given the opportunity to pen an episode, but declined the offer. Davies thought that perhaps she might be willing to appear as herself instead. Apparently, David Tennant never quite warmed up to that idea. With no support from author or actor, the crossover plan was scrapped.

13 Supernatural/The Vampire Diaries

As previously stated, throughout its 14 season run, Supernatural has never shied away from taking risks – which is why the show appears on this list several times. Once upon a time, the Winchesters once almost crossed paths with the Salvatore Brothers. Apparently the Supernatural team approached Julie Plec and Kevin Williamson with the idea that these two worlds would find a way to collide.

Plec and Williamson felt that, although both shows were supernatural in nature, the worlds were simply too different. In retrospect, Plec thinks that it could’ve been fun, but at the time, TVD was only in its early days. There was still so much work to be done to fully flesh out Mystic Falls, and incorporating elements from Supernatural’s already established mythology probably just seemed like too much to handle.

12 24/Die Hard

The fifth Die Hard movie wound up with the title: A Good Day to Die Hard. That wasn’t the case at first, though. The film was initially going to be called Die Hard 24/7, because 24’s Jack Bauer was going to be meeting up with John McClane. It’s unclear how far development had gotten on the project before Kiefer Sutherland backed out, but it was rumored that he did so to focus solely on 24.

24 did eventually find new life in the form of a television movie, limited series and a revival – sans Sutherland. There’s no word on how McClane and Bauer would’ve met, but it seems likely now that they never will.

11 Gossip Girl/The O.C.

The end of Gossip Girl season two featured what was meant to be a backdoor pilot for a spinoff about Lily Rhodes and her sister Carol as teenagers in 1980s California. Despite its cast of Brittany Snow, Krysten Ritter, and ‘80s heartthrob Andrew McCarthy, the show wasn’t picked up.

Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage had focused on the East Coast with Gossip Girl, but prior to that, The O.C. saw them spinning stories about the West Coast. When plotting the GG spinoff, they considered having Lily and Carol cross paths with a young Kirsten Nichol and her then sweetheart, Jimmy Cooper. Perhaps present-day Orange County natives could’ve eventually found their way to the Upper East Side as well. Sadly, the CW passed on the series and we’ll never get a showdown between Blair Waldorf and Summer Roberts.

10 Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D./Inhumans

This idea won’t be a surprise to any Marvel fans, considering how much sense this crossover would’ve made. Of course, this was pitched well before anyone realized just how awful Inhumans would actually turn out. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. started out as fairly mediocre, but quickly improved and, in the opinion of most who stuck with the show, has only gotten better with each passing season. However, the series was never just plain bad.

Showrunner Scott Buck had admitted that while Inhumans was launching as its own entity, an eventual crossover was obviously not out of the question. If the series had survived, it seems pretty clear that Marvel would’ve seen fit to find a way to connect it to AoS. As it stands though, the Royal Family never even made it to season 2.

9 Sherlock/Doctor Who

Long before Jodie Whitaker became the first female Doctor, fans were crying out for some sort of Sherlock/Doctor Who crossover. Sherlock co-creator Steven Moffat also happened to be a writer and producer on Doctor Who, a fact that was not lost on viewers. Moffat had stated that he would be onboard for these two fascinating figures to meet, but that no one else working on either show really wanted this to happen.

Moffat may have loved the idea, but his fellow Sherlock creator Mark Gatiss was positive that fan excitement would quickly be replaced with disappointment. Gatiss is not into mashups of this kind in general, but he also feels that the shows are just two different to find a sensible way to put them together.

8 30 Rock/Parks and Recreation

30 Rock and Parks and Recreation are two of TV’s most beloved sitcoms. Ever since they went off the air, in 2013 and 2015 respectively, viewers have been clamoring for them both to return in some form. When asked if there was any word on a 30 Rock reboot or revival, Tina Fey had no new updates. She did, however, have the best idea ever.

According to Fey, Amy Poehler is ready for a reboot of Parks and Rec, so why not just do a spinoff centering on Liz Lemon and Leslie Knope? It’s likely that there are few fans of either show out there who wouldn’t love to see this happen. Surely, these two brilliant women could figure out a clever way for their television counterparts to meet up onscreen. Alas, Fey was likely just toying with our emotions.

7 Supernatural/iZombie

Although it’s often the Supernatural team that comes up with the crazy crossover ideas, in this case it was Diane Ruggiero-Wright. Along with Rob Thomas, she developed iZombie for television and had the thought that some sort of event involving the Winchesters would be really cool. The crossover may have indeed been awesome, but it was quickly pointed out to Ruggiero-Wright by another showrunner that there was absolutely no way for it to happen that would make any kind of sense.

Although the shows are certainly both supernatural in nature and even share a somewhat similar tone, the major differences are in a whole lot of details. Plus, would fan favorite Blain even manage to survive if Sam and Dean showed up in Seattle? We doubt it.

6 Star Trek/Babylon 5

Fans have long noted the similarities between Star Trek: Deep Space 9 and Babylon 5, which were both airing at the same time throughout the ‘90s. This is a rather strange case in that it wouldn’t have so much resulted in an actual crossover, as it would’ve meant that Babylon 5 could’ve been set in the Star Trek universe.

Although DS9 hit TV screens before B5, J. Michael Straczynski actually pitched his idea for the latter before the former ever went into production. He brought it to Paramount, which passed on the project, but shortly thereafter began developing something similar. Straczynski has stated that he doesn’t believe that the creators of DS9 intentionally ripped off his work, but that he wouldn’t be surprised if those privy to his original pitch helped steer them in a certain direction to begin with.

5 The Incredible Hulk/The Amazing Spider-Man

Although CBS’s The Incredible Hulk enjoyed a long and successful run, the show’s contemporary The Amazing Spider-Man was canceled after a mere thirteen episodes and has been largely forgotten. Even Stan Lee himself wasn’t a fan. However, Bill Bixby (Bruce Banner) got in touch with Nicholas Hammond (Peter Parker) to discuss the potential for a 1984 TV crossover starring both heroes.

Hammond liked the idea, hopeful that it would redeem his live-action iteration of Spidey. It would seem that the project was a go, but one can’t really plan a Spider-Man/Hulk special without someone to portray the Jade Giant. Apparently, Lou Ferrigno was unavailable, so the project was scrapped before it had even truly begun.

4 Quantum Leap/Magnum P.I.

Donald Bellisario has been responsible for creating many popular shows over the course of several decades, including Magnum P.I. and Quantum Leap. The latter debuted not too long after the former ended its successful eight year run. However, while it was undoubtedly critically acclaimed, Quantum Leap was never as popular as the Tom Selleck series. In an effort to boost ratings, the plan was to have Beckett “leap” into Thomas Magnum.

Although the plot development was announced by NBC, it would appear that the network failed to actually get the go-ahead from Selleck. Whether due to Selleck’s lack of commitment or to the theory that Bellisario had received interest in a movie based on the show, the episode never wound up happening.

3 The Office/Parks and Recreation

A spinoff centering on Leslie Knope and Liz Lemon obviously makes perfect sense, but Parks and Recreation spinning out of The Office is easy to see as well. This was initially considered, but there was just one problem: Rashida Jones. The actress had portrayed Karen Filippelli on The Office before being cast as Ann Perkins on Parks and Rec.

That wasn’t the end of the discussion, though. The idea was floated that a copy machine on The Office would breakdown and wind up being impossible to repair, so it would land in a warehouse to be refurbished. Once that was completed, the machine would be loaded on a truck to travel to its new home in the Parks and Recreation office of Pawnee. In the end, the decision was made to just keep the shows separate.

2 X-Files/Unsolved Mysteries

Season 5 X-Files episode “Bad Blood” may have become a fan favorite, but the original idea for the installment was completely different. The plan was to frame the episode as an installment of Unsolved Mysteries. Robert Stack would’ve hosted, of course, and Mulder and Scully would have been portrayed by two different actors for the duration of the story – Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny were actually super excited for a week off from shooting.

Ultimately, the crossover was undone by the fact that X-Files scribe Vince Gilligan simply couldn’t make it work on paper, although he loved the idea in theory. Without much time left before the episode needed to be shot, the writer created the vampire-centric “Bad Blood” instead.

1 Supernatural/Friday the 13th

The Winchesters are all about family – well, except for poor Adam. When Bobby found himself trapped in his nightmares during season 3 episode, “Dream a Little Dream of Me”, Sam and Dean went into the dreamscape to rescue him. Remember the sequence that revealed Dean’s immense desire to settle down with Lisa and Ben? Well, he almost shared the screen with Jason Voorhees instead.

In the season 3 DVD featurette, creator Eric Kripke revealed that his initial plan was for Dean to face off against the Friday the 13th psycho in a scene modeled after the ‘80s slasher classics. Unfortunately, the studio who granted them permission to use the character realized too late that they didn’t actually own the rights at all.

Do you wish that some of these canceled crossovers had become a reality? Let us know in the comments!



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2019-01-23 01:01:35

17 ’90s Sitcoms That Went On Too Long (And 13 That Were Canceled Too Soon)

The ‘90s were a crazy time for television. Though it was a period when basic network sitcoms weren’t played out yet and could still be successful, it was also a time when extremely random ideas still happened in smaller supply. Furthermore, the ‘90s have gained a certain significance with the recent bout of sequelized reboots, as many fans still want to see where ‘90s characters are now. There’s a fascination with this era that gives it a strong power over viewers.

The ‘90s turned out a lot of incredible, formative television, as well as more than a few misfires. That being said, the metrics were how TV was measured and the number of alternatives that were available made television consumption in the ‘90s very different than it is today. It wasn’t that difficult for a show with a ridiculous premise to turn into a huge success or for something truly innovative to virtually go unseen. Much like today, a lot of incredible shows were canceled in the ‘90s, and in some instances, entire seasons wouldn’t even get a chance to air.

With that said, here are the 17 ‘90s Sitcoms That Went On Too Long (And 13 That Were Canceled Too Soon)!

30 Went On Too Long: Friends

Friends got very close to overstaying its welcome, but it fortunately didn’t push its luck too far. For some shows, ten seasons is the perfect time to end. However, Friends got boxed into a difficult situation during the end of its run because the show became so popular and important to the network.

Because of this, it had to coax the cast to stay onboard for another year. Accordingly, the final seasons of Friends still feature plenty of highlights, but the writing is very much on the wall. Ending a few years earlier before series low moments like Joey and Rachel’s relationship would have given the show a more pristine image.

29 Went On Too Long: Veronica’s Closet

NBC ran through a slew of middling sitcoms during the ‘90s in the hopes to find the next Friends or Seinfeld. Veronica’s Closet was developed as a vehicle for Kirstie Alley in which she plays the owner of a lingerie company. The show presented a unique take on a workplace sitcom and had plenty of strong female characters present. However, it’s idea never fully came together.

Veronica’s Closet lasted for three seasons, but each year saw a drastic change and it’s clear that the network was unsure of how to make the program work. The final few episodes didn’t even air. Perhaps one season would have been enough.

28 Canceled Too Soon: All-American Girl

All-American Girl deserves points for being the first sitcom from the US to feature an all-Asian family, but, unfortunately, the result was a misguided, confused comedy that arguably did more harm than good. ABC wanted to center a sitcom around the comedy of Margaret Cho, but as soon as All-American Girl went into production, she had any control of the project stripped away from her and had to deal with perpetual changes that undercut the show.

It’s frustrating to see Cho’s chance to shine ruined by elements outside of her control. ABC canceled the show after one season and Cho was the one who took a lot of the ire in the end.

27 Went On Too Long: Suddenly Susan

Suddenly Susan is very much a companion sitcom to Veronica’s Closet. They both featured independent single businesswomen and NBC canceled both of the series at the same time, which seemed as if it couldn’t even tell the difference between the two shows.

Suddenly Susan starred Brooke Shields as Susan Keane, a magazine writer in San Francisco. The show balanced Susan’s love and work life as she learned more about herself. It it ran for nearly 100 episodes. The show was never a critical darling and its final season went through drastic changes in order to find a bigger audience. Quitting while it was ahead might have been the safer plan.

26 Went On Too Long: Step By Step

Step by Step was a pillar of ABC’s TGIF lineup for seven years and provided audiences with what was essentially a modern version of The Brady Bunch. The wholesome comedy looked at two single parents (who each had three kids) who spontaneously get married and become one big, blended family. The show tapped into ABC’s family-friendly approach, but it didn’t exactly do anything new.

In spite of this, though, not only did the series run for over 150 episodes, but it even survived a network change and moved from ABC to CBS. Once the show’s tenure on ABC was done, it would have been a perfect time to call it quits.

25 Canceled Too Soon: Married… With Children

Married…With Children helped put the FOX network on the map and ran for over a decade as a flagship program on the network. For 11 seasons the crude, irreverent Bundy family entertained audiences and provided something much more humbling and flawed than people were used to seeing on TV. The Bundys were clearly fools, but the writers for the show weren’t and, because of this, the series took its time examining each of the oafish individuals.

Even though 11 season is an exceptionally long run, the series still thought that it would be getting one more year, so technically this one was canceled just a little too soon. It would’ve been a lot better if the show was given the extra season to tie up loose ends.

24 Went On Too Long: Coach

You never know what’s going to resonate with audiences, which is exactly why a simple sitcom about a football coach and his supporting staff lasted for 200 episodes over the course of nine seasons. Craig T. Nelson played Hayden Fox on Coach. The exploits of this proud coach’s career and his time with his family found an interesting balance that worked for many viewers.

The final few years of Coach saw Nelson’s Hayden Fox actually become a coach for an NFL team and stretch the limits of the show’s reality to some degree. Getting out a little earlier before the show had to start turning to wackier storylines probably would’ve been a better idea.

23 Went On Too Long: Dharma And Greg

Dharma and Greg is one of the most brilliantly basic shows out there, and yet it was still able to run for five full seasons and for over 100 episodes. Opposites attract is the entire premise of this sitcom. Dharma and Greg, two polar opposite individuals, decide to get married after one date and lead a crazy life together.

Greg is a straight-laced professional lawyer, while Dharma is a yoga instructor who follows more of a freewheeling mentality. These differing point of views lead to many of the show’s major conflicts. Dharma and Greg could have ended after one season to little consequence, but its low stakes storytelling and strange energy surprisingly captured viewers.

22 Canceled Too Soon: Caroline In The City

Caroline in the City features Lea Thompson as Caroline Duffy, a cartoonist of the popular “Caroline in the City” comic strip. The comedy examines Caroline’s life along with the number of interesting characters in her orbit. It was a popular addition to NBC’s “Must See TV” lineup. The show increasingly centered around Caroline’s romantic endeavors and her “will they, won’t they” relationship with Richard.

Caroline in the City saw a healthy run of nearly 100 episodes, but it ended on a major wedding cliffhanger and the show clearly wasn’t finished telling its story. It deserved the right to end on its own terms.

21 Went On Too Long: Mad About You

Seven seasons is arguably not too long for a network’s flagship program. Mad About You was an anchor of NBC’s “Must See TV” schedule and the show won a dozen Emmy Awards over the course of its run. However, the series actually wanted to end earlier. While the show’s seventh season has a perfect finale, during the show’s fourth and fifth seasons, Paul Reiser and Danny Jacobson considered ending the series while they were on top.

The show went forward and found plenty of new territory for married couple Paul and Jamie Buchman (namely, a baby). The later episodes hold up, but ending earlier could have left an even stronger legacy.

20 Canceled Too Soon: Two Guys And A Girl

Two Guys and a Girl, or Two Guys, A Girl, and a Pizza Place, as it started, is the definition of a hangout sitcom that coasts on the chemistry and charisma of the cast. There was nothing remarkable about this show’s premise — friends live together, go to work, and pine for love together — but it featured the likes of Ryan Reynolds and Nathan Fillion, who helped to elevate the show’s material.

The series went through a bunch of retooling in an effort to find audiences. However, even though the show saw a decent run of 81 episodes over the course of four seasons, it had the juice for one more and could have easily hit 100.

19 Went On Too Long: The Nanny

The Nanny was influenced by other works, such as  My Fair Lady and Pretty Woman, as Fran Drescher’s Fran Fine indoctrinates herself into the life of the Sheffield family and slowly wins over Maxwell’s heart. The series saw a popular run for six seasons and nearly 150 episodes, but the tide started to turn during its final year.

The last season not only delayed the series finale by several weeks, but it then proceeded to broadcast a number of unaired episodes from earlier in the season, completely disrupting the show’s flow. It really seemed like CBS was over the show by its final season and ending earlier while the show were receiving better treatment would have avoided the sloppy conclusion.

18 Canceled Too Soon: Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs was a wildly bold project for its time. Jim Henson’s pet project to make a sitcom about a family of dinosaurs was continually deemed crazy, but when The Simpsons started to gain traction and popularity, ABC took a shot with the radical idea.

Dinosaurs looked at a regular working class family, but everything was set in a prehistoric setting. It’s an impressive, unique point of view that arguably works even better than The Flintstones. Dinosaurs lasted four years and went out on a conclusive finale, but there was no reason why it couldn’t have held off on that big finish after another year or two given its popularity.

17 Went On Too Long: Full House

Whatever happened to predictability, especially when a middle of the road family sitcom unceremoniously ends after a few years rather than lasting nearly a decade and then spawning a spin-off down the road that perpetuates even more of the same thing. Full House looks at the very extended Tanner family as the children grow up and learn and love along the way. It wasn’t trying to be high art, but that was fine.

Full House lasted for eight seasons and nearly made it to 200 episodes. Clearly nothing has been learned with the birth of Fuller House, as the later seasons are easily the weakest.

16 Canceled Too Soon: Ellen

Ellen DeGeneres’ day-time talk show is one of the most successful of all-time, but back during her sitcom days, she wasn’t always as fortunate. Ellen was basically DeGeneres’ Seinfeld in which she filtered her stand-up comedy and life experiences through a show. She played an exaggerated take on herself (but she ran a book store instead of being a stand-up comedian).

Ellen found success and ran for five seasons, but after DeGeneres and her character came out of the closet and the show began to center more on Ellen’s orientation, ABC began to view the series as “controversial” and later pulled the plug on it.

15 Went On Too Long: Sabrina The Teenage Witch

Sabrina the Teenage Witch was a formative vehicle for Melissa Joan Hart that actually provided viewers with a lot of original content. The problem that Sabrina faced was that the show became so successful that it was forced to keep running in a way that drastically changed the series and lost sight of what it was supposed to be.

As Sabrina moved from high school to college, the show’s cast changed and Sabrina’s aunts eventually left the picture. The show moved from ABC to the WB for its final year, but it failed to do anything worthwhile with Sabrina in its new settings.

14 Canceled Too Soon: Stark Raving Mad

Stark Raving Mad was a show that did everything right, but just couldn’t strike enough of a chord with audiences. The show featured Neil Patrick Harris as a neat freak editor who is paired up with a moody horror novelist who was played by Tony Shalhoub. In a sense, the series was a sly update of The Odd Couple, but the fact that Shalhoub’s character was supposed to be a Stephen King proxy and the fact that the show so often dabbled in horror territory made it even more distinct.

Neil Patrick Harris and Tony Shalhoub had fantastic chemistry in the show, but the series only lasted a season and four episodes went unaired.

13 Went On Too Long: Home Improvement

Home Improvement looked at the bumbling grunt-tastic adventures of Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor as his extreme DIY renovations drove his family crazy. Much like many of the sitcoms that were centered around comedians, the premise wasn’t as important, as the show instead focused on the comedy and charisma of its cast. Tim Allen would hilariously throw himself into handyman adventures that often went very gone wrong. It was one of the most popular comedies on television for a while and ran for over 200 episodes.

Home Improvement doesn’t jump through any hoops during its later seasons. Jonathan Taylor Thomas left during the final season, though, so ending the show a year earlier could have provided a better finale.

12 Canceled Too Soon: ALF

In some ways, it’s kind of a miracle that a family sitcom about a sardonic, wisecracking alien that eats cats could even last for four seasons, but the ‘80s and ‘90s marked a crazy era for television. ALF’s titular character has somewhat remained in the public and everybody seems to be aware of the oddball furry alien from Melmac. However, the sitcom didn’t work out as well as the writers thought.

ALF turned out four strong seasons and easily could have gone on for longer, but the biggest reason why this cancelation came too soon was because the finale involved ALF getting captured by the government, which was a rather bleak last note.

11 Went On Too Long: Family Matters

Family Matters was a great example of the dangers that can happen when a series goes on for too long. Family Matters started as a look at Carl Winslow’s home life and the frustrations that he faced, but as time went on, it increasingly turned into “The Urkel Show.”

This became even more obvious in the show’s final seasons, which also decided to throw common sense and reality out the window, too. Urkel’s rudimentary science skills evolved to levels where he was able to travel through time, teleport, and do all sorts of impossible things that were clearly desperate attempts to keep the show exciting. Considering the fact that some episodes involved Urkel fighting pirates, it’s pretty obvious that the show outstayed its welcome.

10 Canceled Too Soon: Action

Action was a sitcom that took a deeply cynical, nihilistic look at Hollywood culture and the nature of celebrities that seems extremely prescient now. The series centered around Jay Mohr’s Peter Dragon, the head of Dragonfire Film, and offered one of the more bitingly dark parodies of the entertainment industry (it was even the first FOX series to receive a TV-MA rating). The show even featured a Harvey Weinstein surrogate character doing extremely unscrupulous things.

Though Action made a strong impression, it was ultimately too much for FOX and audiences. Only eight episodes from the 13-episode season ended up airing before the plug was pulled on it.

9 Went On Too Long: Just Shoot Me!

Much like Suddenly Susan, Just Shoot Me! was a workplace sitcom that was set at a magazine publishing company. Just Shoot Me! handled the topic successfully and also benefited from having a strong cast that really gelled well together and knew how to sell its cynical brand of comedy.

Just Shoot Me! experienced a very strong initial run, but like many shows, the network tampered with the program and created a muddled final season that felt off to most viewers. Season seven introduced Rena Sofer to the cast and a bunch of broader storylines along with her. Though Sofer’s inclusion was not a total misfire, the show should’ve focused instead on ending things on a strong note rather than including a messy final year that never did the show justice.

8 Canceled Too Soon: NewsRadio

Seinfeld and Friends are heralded as the big sitcoms from the ‘90s — and rightfully so — but NewsRadio was a strong comedy that truly understood how to use its exceptional cast. Phil Hartman was obvious standout, but everyone in the cast was a gem. The show even found a way to make Andy Dick seem affable.

NewsRadio’s third and fourth seasons are some of the most consistent work you’ll find in a sitcom, but NBC was never fully on board with the sometimes-dark series. NewsRadio still got to have five strong years, but it had a lot more to say, and even though Jon Lovitz’ addition in the final season wasn’t as strong, the show still found a way to make it work.

7 Went On Too Long: Spin City

Spin City was a Bill Lawrence sitcom that looked at the workings within the government of New York City and took a fairly unique approach to its comedy. The series centered around Michael J. Fox’s Deputy Mayor, but after the actor’s Parkinson’s Disease became too intense, he left the show after the fourth season and was replaced with Charlie Sheen.

Charlie Sheen actually did a commendable job in this show, but, unfortunately, a lot of the show’s spark was gone during its final two seasons. Several other cast members were also dropped between seasons without explanation. Because of this, ending the show with Fox’s exit might have been the better move.

6 Canceled Too Soon: Sports Night

Before Aaron Sorkin struck gold with The West Wing or found success as a director, his first foray in television was in an ABC comedy called Sports Night. Much in the style of Sorkin’s other works, the show looked at the people who worked at an average cable sports network and produced a nightly sports show.

Even for those with no interest in sports, Sports Night still sparkles. Sorkin’s dialogue and his character’s relationships were great and audiences truly felt like they knew the interesting and complex characters. It was a true gem that the network didn’t fully understand. It even tried to add a laugh track to Sorkin’s lighting fast dialogue, which didn’t work for the quick-paced series.

5 Went On Too Long: The King Of Queens

The King of Queens was your standard “dopey husband, nagging wife” sitcom that CBS was somehow able to make successful. That’s not to say that The King of Queens wasn’t enjoyable or without its charm, but something so simple didn’t need to last for eight seasons and more than 200 episodes.

So many of its’ storylines repeated the same basic idea. Just because something was popular, this didn’t mean that the producers needed to milk the series to its absolute limit. Ending a few years earlier would have made for a stronger finish. However, with shows like Kevin Can Wait happening, people are clearly still eager to see Kevin James and Leah Remini together.

4 Canceled Too Soon: Freaks And Geeks

Though Freaks and Geeks was not technically be a sitcom, it brought up many of the touchstones of the genre. Back in the days when Paul Feig and Judd Apatow weren’t high school names, they put together a beautiful little show that authentically captured the high school experience, but from the perspective of the outcasts.

Honest relationships, flawed characters, and progressive storylines all helped Freaks and Geeks stand out, but it didn’t last beyond its one season at NBC.The show has since gone on to gain almost legendary status and it doesn’t hurt that basically everyone from the show’s cast is now a huge movie star.

3  Went On Too Long: Roseanne

Even without the fresh, new tenth season of Roseanne that came last year and The Conners that’s still on television, Roseanne was still running on empty during the original run of the series. The show was supposed to be an honest look at a relatable working-class family, and when it stuck to that mission statement, it could be fantastic.

Seasons eight and nine of the series pushed the show to its limits and featured outlandish storylines that were motivated by the Conners winning the lottery. The show soon got out of hand, as it pulled off crazy stunts that didn’t feel true to its nature. Ending things earlier would have avoided some very silly decisions that diluted the show’s brand.

2 Canceled Too Soon: Get A Life

Get A Life was a sitcom that lasted for two years on FOX. In it, Chris Elliott played a thirty year-old paperboy who still lived with his parents. The show was less interested in pleasing its audiences and more concerned with stretching the boundaries of what could be done in a sitcom.

The cult favorite show featured incredible writers like Adam Resnick, David Mirkin, Bob Odenkirk, and even Charlie Kaufman. The show broke reality whenever possible, as Chris even expired at the end of several episodes and then was miraculously fine the next week. Get A Life was an exciting, innovative sitcom that was clearly ahead of its time and went over most audience’s heads.

1 Went On Too Long: The Drew Carey Show

The Drew Carey Show began with a lot of promise. It was such a boon for ABC that the network made the bold move to renew the season for several seasons at once. This led to the show sticking around for nearly 250 episodes, even though viewership greatly dropped over the final few seasons. Not only that, but the show also featured multiple reinventions and Drew got married several times, all to catastrophic effect.

The series’ final years changed even more and “event episodes” and “crossovers” with Whose Line is it Anyway? became regular occurrences. Ending the show back in season five or six before it had gone too off the rails would have been a good idea.

Are there any other ’90s sitcoms that were canceled too soon or went on too long? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-12-30 01:12:25