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Roseanne Blames Co-Star Sara Gilbert for Revival Firing & Cancellation

Roseanne Barr is still quite angry about about being fired from her show, and now specifically blames former co-star Sara Gilbert for her downfall. Regardless of one’s opinion concerning Barr herself, there’s no doubt that Roseanne is a deservedly iconic sitcom, and worthy of inclusion in any hypothetical TV show hall of fame. Running for nearly a decade, Roseanne was one of the defining comedies of the 1990s, and cast a welcome focus on a family of working class people that struggled with everyday issues.

In the current age of remakes, revivals, and sequels to classic TV shows, it wasn’t too surprising when talk got around to bringing back Roseanne. Of course, the biggest wild card coming into ABC’s Roseanne revival was the titular lead actress herself. Barr’s politics had taken a hard right turn in the time since her show ended, going from vocal liberal firebrand to stalwart supporter of Republican candidate (and ultimately president) Donald Trump. While she’s certainly entitled to her opinions, Barr had also developed a reputation for engaging in fiery and antagonistic pro-Trump rhetoric on Twitter, and most dangerously, sharing and promoting various conspiracy theories.

Related: Roseanne Cancellation Drama: Every Tweet & Reaction

With that in mind, any TV network going into business with Barr had to know full well what they were getting into. It’s hard to believe ABC executives didn’t foresee a scenario in which Barr unleashed a racist remark on Twitter, and sure enough, that infamously happened. Whether they anticipated it or not, ABC wasted no time in firing Barr, and canceling Roseanne, which had just recently been renewed for another season. Barr has since blamed multiple culprits for her behavior, including Ambien, anti-Trump forces in Hollywood, and at one point, her co-stars for “throwing her under the bus.” Now, as part of a new interview with The Washington Post, Barr has set her sights on one particular person she blames for her career spiraling downward: onscreen daughter Sara Gilbert.

She destroyed the show and my life with that tweet. She will never get enough until she consumes my liver with a fine Chianti.

Based on her own words, Barr seems to believe that at the point Gilbert sent out her Tweet condemning Barr’s actions, there was still a chance of salvaging the Roseanne revival. To be fair, ABC’s cancellation announcement did follow Gilbert’s Tweet very closely. That said, the idea that Gilbert weighing in is what ultimately made ABC – and parent company Disney – decide to cancel a top-level moneymaker like Roseanne is a huge stretch. It recalls Barr’s prior insistence that she was fired due to her support of Trump, when she was already a vocal Trump supporter prior to ABC greenlighting the revival, a similar stretching of logic. For her part, Gilbert told The Washington Post:While I’m extremely disappointed and heartbroken over the dissolution of the original show, she will always be family, and I will always love Roseanne.

While Barr recently returned to stand-up, and remains active on the conservative political talk scene, it’s still unclear if her mainstream acting career will eventually recover. People have certainly come back from doing worse. That said, Barr’s continued refusal to accept full personal responsibility for what happened to her – she’s expressed remorse publicly several times, but always ends up backtracking later –  is only likely to delay any possible moment of redemption career-wise. In the meantime, ABC just renewed Roseanne-less spinoff The Conners for season 2.

More: What To Expect From The Conners Season 2

Source: The Washington Post


2019-03-22 10:03:26

Michael Kennedy

Jon Bernthal Has Made Peace With The Punisher’s Possible Cancellation

Jon Bernthal in Marvel's The Punisher Netflix

Fans may not be OK with The Punisher’s seemingly imminent cancellation, but Jon Bernthal has already made peace with it. The actor made his debut as Frank Castle during Daredevil’s sophomore outing and was such a hit with viewers that Netflix quickly greenlit his own series.

Due to the fact that the episodes only just became available, it may seem strange to already be discussing the possibility of The Punisher’s cancellation. However, considering Netflix’s recent decisions regarding its Marvel properties, Frank Castle’s future is looking pretty bleak. When Iron Fist got the ax after just two seasons, fans weren’t too surprised. That said, although it was the least popular Marvel Netflix entry, the general consensus was that the show’s second season was much improved, giving viewers hope that the series could continue. Still, Netflix canceling it wasn’t too much of a shock. However, the streaming titan then surprised fans by announcing the end of the criticality acclaimed Luke Cage just one week later. Then, despite rave reviews from fans and critics alike for its third season, it was revealed shortly thereafter that Daredevil had been canceled as well.

Related: Punisher Season 2’s Jigsaw Reveal Is A Hilarious Letdown

Jon Bernthal is aware of the likelihood that season 2 of The Punisher might be the show’s last. Speaking to Variety about his uncertain future as Frank Castle, the actor appears to be taking the possibility in stride, saying:

“I know the reality of the situation and I’m at peace with it. I really only worry about the things I can control. When I’m playing the character and I’m doing the job and it’s right there in front of me, I do whatever I can to make it as good as I can. But in this business there’s so much we can’t control. Whatever is happening with these shows, these decisions are being made in rooms I’m not invited into and I’m OK with that.”

Jon Bernthal as Frank Castle in The Punisher

Bernthal has gained some acceptance that his time as the Punisher may very well have come to an end, but Daredevil star Charlie Cox has expressed difficulty coping with the fact that he will no longer be playing Matt Murdock. Despite a fan campaign to save Daredevil, Netflix does not appear to be changing their minds on the matter, and all of this fuels speculation that Netflix’s partnership with Marvel is coming to an end. It won’t be long before Disney launches their own streaming service, a fact that many feel is responsible for Netflix’s corner of the MCU going dark. The Mouse House has already announced several shows centering on Marvel characters that will air exclusively on Disney Plus. And, though Netflix executives have previously stated that they remain in control of how long their Marvel shows continue, rumors persist that it was Marvel who pulled the plug.

The Punisher was safe for a time, but now that season 2 is on the air, it seems likely that Netflix will announce its cancellation soon. Jessica Jones is still waiting on a third season, set to drop later this year, but her story will probably be wrapping up as well. While it is true that the end of Frank Castle’s journey has not yet been announced, it would seem a forgone conclusion at this point. When Iron Fist and Luke Cage were canceled, it seemed possible that it was to make way for a potential Heroes for Hire or Daughters of the Dragon series. Sadly, Daredevil getting the ax seems to only confirm what many fans were already dreading: Marvel’s street level heroes will no longer be suiting up for Netflix. It’s admirable that Bernthal has already made peace with The Punisher’s possible cancellation, but most viewers have not.

More: The Defenders Is What Killed Netflix’s Marvel Shows

The Punisher season 2 is currently available on Netflix.

Source: Variety



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2019-01-18 03:01:18

Daredevil’s Charlie Cox Opens Up About the Show’s Cancellation

Charlie Cox has opened up about the cancellation of Daredevil on Netflix. Cox was the first of the Marvel heroes to be cast for Netflix and has spent most of his time for the last four years playing the blind vigilante. Despite the acclaim that the series brought both Marvel and Netflix, the show has come to a close.

The decision to cancel Daredevil was part of a larger movement showcasing the divide between Marvel and Netflix. In the weeks prior to the premiere of Daredevil season 3, the companies canceled both Iron Fist and Luke Cage after two seasons apiece. Despite evidence pointing towards a cancellation being in the show’s future, many were still optimistic that Daredevil would live on after the overwhelmingly positive reception to its third season. Even those involved with the series believed a fourth season was inevitable with the entire next story already laid out. Unfortunately, this didn’t stop the series from being canceled, which was reportedly a decision made by Marvel.

Related: Why Daredevil Was Cancelled

EW had the opportunity to be the first to speak with Cox, who played Matt Murdock (aka Daredevil), getting his thoughts on the cancellation. He was very straightforward in his response, noting how he too did not expect season 3 to be the end. That said, the cancellation is still sinking in for the actor who still finds it bizarre to think he may never play the Devil of Hell’s Kitchen again. He said:

“A lot of us really expected to keep going, and I certainly did. The truth is, I felt like we had a lot of stories to tell, and although I understand [the cancellation], I’m very saddened by that. It’s just how business works. But also, these characters mean a lot to people. It’s weird to think there’s a chance I won’t be playing Matt Murdock ever again. That’s a bizarre feeling, because that character has been such a huge part of my life for the last four and a half years.”

Starring in Daredevil was a career-changing role for Cox and elevated him to leading man material with a massive property. For many fans, he has become as synonymous with Daredevil as some of the biggest superhero stars are with their respective characters. Later on in the interview, Cox mentioned how much he loved the role, not just from an actor’s perspective, but also thanks to the stunt work that was required. He became heavily invested in doing as much of his own stunts as possible, which is part of the reason why season three’s incredible one-take fight was possible to pull off.

Cox was, however, hesitant to discuss the future. EW asked him about the plans for season four that were in the works, but he didn’t want to divulge that information just yet. His biggest concern with revealing the future story was giving fans “false hope” of what could have been. Instead, he’s going to let the fresh wounds of the cancellation heal before discussing those details. While he wouldn’t discuss season 4, he was asked about his interest in returning to the role in a different capacity if given the chance. Unsurprisingly, Cox is absolutely willing to return, but doesn’t know how that could happen. At this time, no such future likely awaits Cox or any of the other Marvel/Netflix stars, but at least everyone will always have the first three seasons of Daredevil to lean on to see his excellent portrayal.

MORE: Daredevil Was One of Netflix’s Most Popular Shows

Source: EW



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2018-12-06 04:12:20

Marvel Releases Official Statement On Daredevil Cancellation

After the not-entirely-surprising cancellation of Netflix’s Daredevil, Marvel steps in with an official statement, hinting that the Man Without Fear’s adventures are far from over. The news that the show would not continue on to a fourth season on Netflix was at least partially expected, given how Luke Cage and Iron Fist were already given their respective walking papers, as the streaming giant prepares to shore up its original offerings in advance of Marvel’s parent company debuting its own direct-to-consumer streaming service, Disney+. That effort will have lasting ramifications on the television side of Marvel’s live-action universe, leaving audiences with questions regarding the future of characters like Daredevil, Luke Cage, Iron Fist, and, of course, Jessica Jones and the Punisher. 

The latter two have their third and second seasons, respectively, on the horizon, and given the way the wind is blowing, with regard to Marvel and Netflix’s partnership, it’s a good bet those seasons will serve as the final ones for both series. But while the collaboration between the House of Ideas and the streaming giant looks to be headed toward its own definitive conclusion, the former isn’t ready to call it quits when it comes to the future of Daredevil. 

More: Exclusive Westworld Video Explains The Truth Behind Delos & The Show’s Theme

That’s not to say Marvel has revealed any specific plans for the character, following his series’ cancellation, but the company made it clear that Matt Murdock has a future… somewhere. Whether that means on Disney+ or in theaters or something else entirely is unclear, but perhaps fans can take comfort in the company’s vague assurances it doesn’t plan to shelve the character permanently. Check out Marvel’s official statement as posted on the company’s website:

“Marvel is extremely grateful to the huge audience that loved Marvel’s Daredevil. From the moment of young Matt’s first act of heroism to the birth of Page, Murdock, & Nelson, it has been a unbelievable journey. We are incredibly proud of the amazing showrunners and writers starting with Drew Goddard and Steven DeKnight, Marco Ramirez and Doug Petrie and Erik Oleson, Charlie Cox, Deborah Ann Woll, Elden Henson, Vincent D’Onofrio and our casts who brought our characters to life with such excellence, and every one of the fantastic crews in NYC. We look forward to more adventures with the Man without Fear in the future.”

One of the biggest questions right now is, should a live-action Daredevil continue, what form will it take? Now that it’s off Netflix, will Disney want to reboot the character again, to better fit with its overall plans for the MCU and its upcoming streaming service, or will it chose to pick up where it left off, with Matt, Karen, and Foggy renewing their partnership and beginning anew? Time will only tell, with regard to what’s next for the Hero or Hell’s Kitchen.

Next: Vikings Season 5B Review: Power And Revenge Drive A Methodical Premiere

Daredevil seasons 1-3 are available to stream on Netflix. 

Source: Marvel



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Daredevil Cast & Crew React To Cancellation; Season 4 Was ‘Laid Out’

The cast and crew of Daredevil react to Netflix’s cancelation of the series. The first Marvel TV series created in partnership with the streaming giant, the Charlie Cox-led show just dropped its critically acclaimed third outing last month. Its season finale was crafted so well that it is a satisfying end to Matt Murdock’s adventures. That said, considering the quality of its latest installment, many were still hoping that a fourth season was going to happen. Sadly, that won’t be the case anymore as the show’s declining viewership ultimately led to its cancelation.

It was just a little bit over a month ago when Daredevil season 3 showrunner Erik Oleson called Netflix’s cancellation of Iron Fist heartbreaking despite the fact that it showed significant progress in its second season. Now, he finds himself in the same boat – if not worse, as the company officially pull the plug on Marvel TV’s inaugural show in the platform despite putting up arguably the best season of any Marvel show on the streaming service.

Related: How Netflix Can Save Its Remaining Marvel Shows

Following the announcement that came late Thursday, the cast and crew of the series have started to express their opinion with regard to this development including Deborah Ann Woll (Karen Page), who took to her official Twitter account to share her sentiments following the show’s cancellation. Thanking her fellow castmates, as well as Oleson, the actress admits that she’ll miss working with everyone who contributed to Daredevil over the last few years. Meanwhile, co-executive producer Sam Ernst also reacted to the sad news on the same social media platform, but he was more candid with his tweet, even saying that that season 4 was all laid out. Check out their posts below:

Two weeks ago, Oleson announced he had pitched season 4 to Netflix. He didn’t get into specifics of what could be next for Matt now that Kingpin (Vincent D’Onofrio) is back in prison, but since then, he, alongside the legion of Daredevil fans, had been on tenterhooks waiting for the streaming giant’s decision on whether or not they’d greenlight another outing of the show. Based on Ernst’s social media post, it sounds like they were really confident with what they were planning for the series moving forward. Interestingly, the official statement released by Netflix pointed out that “the Daredevil character will live on in future projects for Marvel,” giving the impression the show might continue on another platform. However, given the divide between Marvel Studios and Marvel TV, it’s doubtful Kevin  Feige and his team would be open to carrying over the show on Disney+ knowing that they’re also set to produce MCU-connected small-screen projects. 

With Iron Fist, Luke Cage and now Daredevil all officially canceled, Netflix only has two remaining Marvel TV shows on their platform: Jessica Jones and The Punisher. At this point, chances are that the only reason the two series are still in the cards is that they have their respective next seasons on the docket. But it shouldn’t come as a surprise when the platform eventually cancels them shortly after they drop their upcoming installments.

More: Why Daredevil Was Canceled By Netflix

Source: Various (see links)




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The Disney-Fox Deal Will Close January 2019

The Walt Disney Company and 21st Century Fox’s major merger is coming together faster than anticipated and will now officially be completed on January 1, 2019. Fox has plenty of success over the years through a variety of media outlets, but determined they could not properly compete in the movie and TV space. They looked to sell these branches of the company and quickly found Disney to be their preferred buyer. Comcast attempted to pull the deal out from under Disney’s reaches, but simply made them pay them pay $71 billion for Fox’s assets instead of the initial $54 billion bid.

There has been plenty of resistance to the deal because of the monopoly Disney continues to grow and the job losses that will come from it. From Disney’s perspective, they view the Fox acquisition as a great way to enhance their library of content prior to launching their own streaming service late next year. Throughout the process, it was anticipated that summer 2019 would be when the deal would close, but it’ll actually be much sooner.

Related: What Will Happen to Fox’s R-Rated Franchises Under Disney?

Variety shared the news that 21st Century Fox president Peter Rice told Fox employees the merger will be “ready to close” on January 1, 2019. This effectively means that 2018 will be the final year for this current look of Fox and moves up the timeline for the merger as a result.

Disney and Fox shareholders officially approved the terms of the merger back in July, less than a month after the Department of Justice approved the deal on their own. The studios have since been seeking approval in various countries around the world, while also figuring out the new hierarchy of Disney in a post-merger landscape. For Rice’s part, he’s joining Disney as a top TV executive. Disney recently made several of these types of moves official, while other executives have already found jobs elsewhere for when the merger closes.

The accelerated timetable of the deal comes after reports that a late 2018 finalization could be possible. They will miss this mark by a day it appears, as both studios now hope to become one at the turn of the calendar year. This is all barring some unforeseen mishap with the deal, but considering how well the deal has gone so far, it is difficult to imagine anything coming up now that would hinder them from completing the deal on Jan 1. After all, Rice told this to all of Fox’s current employees in a town-hall setting at their Los Angeles studio, so they must be confident that this date will stick. How quickly changes, such as cancellation of some projects or Marvel Studios’ plans for the X-Men, are made from then on remain to be seen. But, we do at least now know when the merger will be completed.

MORE: Marvel Has Time To Put X-Men Into Avengers 4 (But Probably Won’t)

Source: Variety



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2018-10-10 01:10:31 – Cooper Hood

6 Casting Decisions That Hurt It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia (And 14 That Saved It)

There are sitcoms that everyone loves, and then there’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia — a series which has managed to turn off many with its despicable characters and depraved sense of humor. From faking cancer to trying to eat a homeless person, there are no depths that are too low for the owners of Paddy’s Pub. But you don’t get to thirteen seasons without making a few fans in the process.

While It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia might not pull in the biggest numbers, the show has maintained such a rabid following over the years that one has to wonder if they’ve accidentally gotten there hands on some raccoon meat. But the more likely scenario is that many people have just as twisted of a sense of humor as the makers of this FX series.

The sitcom was created by Rob McElhenney with the help of Glenn Howerton and Charlie Day, who would go on to portray Mac, Dennis, and Charlie on the series. Kaitlin Olson and Danny DeVito fill out the rest of the main cast as Dee and Frank Reynolds, and for over the last decade, fans have been happily following the bizarre misadventures of the Gang. Of course, it’s impossible to imagine anyone else in these leading roles. With over 130 episodes, there has been no shortage of supporting characters and celebrity cameo, some of which have been a lot better than others.

Here are 6 Casting Decisions That Hurt It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia (And 14 That Saved It).

20 Saved: Glenn Howerton as Dennis Reynolds

In a sea of despicable characters, Dennis Reynolds has slowly revealed himself to be the most reprehensible of them all. Dennis may have begun the series as one of the more sensible members of the Gang — albeit one with an extremely short fuse, but he’s slowly revealed himself to be a cool and calculated sociopath. One who also happens to have a heavy side of narcissistic personality disorder.

While Glenn Howerton didn’t want to name the character after himself for fear of people drawing an unwelcome comparison, that hasn’t stopped Howerton from taking the character to some extremely dark places. He’s more than a little convincing when he lays out one of his manipulative plans. While his temper tantrums may be over-the-top, you never doubt the authenticity of the rage and frustration Howerton has embedded into his performance.

19 Saved: Mary Elizabeth Ellis as The Waitress

One of the most prominent recurring characters on It’s Always Sunny, the Waitress has been a part of the series since the very beginning. She is the unrequited love interest of Charlie throughout the majority of the show — though it seems like the tables have turned in recent episodes.

The Waitress is portrayed by Mary Elizabeth Ellis, who had previously worked with Charlie Day on an episode of Reno 911! The two were married shortly after It’s Always Sunny began, adding another layer of hilarity to the dysfunctional relationship between the two characters on screen.

Ellis fully commits to her performance as the down-on-her-luck waitress.

She’s an example of the tight-knit community working behind-the-scenes that has made the series such a success.

18 Hurt: Jason Sudeikis as Schmitty

While sitcoms usually lend themselves well to celebrity cameos, It’s Always Sunny has created such a distinct world that more often than not these cameos end up feeling out of place. There have been a few instances where they’ve managed to pull them off. Josh Groban popping up in one of Dee’s fantasies seemed fitting, and Dax Shepard manages to blend in fairly well into the episodes where Mac and Charlie join a cult.

In the case of Jason Sudeikis and a number of other celebrities, the cameos just end up coming across as distracting. There’s nothing inherently wrong with Jason Sudeikis playing Schmitty — an ex-member of the Gang who makes an unexpected return. The whole time, you never forget that you’re watching Sudeikis, which just doesn’t work for the tone of the series.

17 Saved: Mary Lynn Rajskub as Gail the Snail

Though she’s only appeared in three episodes of the series to date, Gail the Snail is definitely one of those side characters that we’d like to see more of. She first appeared back in the season five episode “The Gang Gives Frank an Intervention”, where she is the clingy cousin of Dennis and Dee who talks with a lisp and has the disgusting habit of slurping her saliva. Dennis and Dee have found that the only way to get rid of her is to dust her with salt, hence her nickname of Gail the Snail.

The character is portrayed by the talented Mary Lynn Rajskub, who is best known for playing Chloe O’Brian on 24.

This is undeniably a very different character, and it’s impressive just how committed Rajskub is to playing someone so hilariously obnoxious.

16 Saved: David Hornsby as Cricket

The Gang has dragged their fair share of individuals down into the dirt with them, but none are more apparent than Rickety Cricket. Portrayed by David Hornsby, Cricket is a former classmate of the Gang who was once infatuated with Dee. He debuted in season two as a clean-cut priest who has slowly transformed into the addicted hobo that we have today.

Hornsby has been such a prominent member of the show that last season he was given his own episode with “A Cricket’s Tale”, which cleverly intertwined the character’s other brief appearances throughout the season into the story. Hornsby has also been a big part of the show behind-the-scenes as well, serving as an executive producer and a writer of nearly 30 episodes.

15 Hurt: Brian Unger as The Attorney

It’s Always Sunny has a number of supporting characters who re-emerge every few seasons, only to be dragged down by the shenanigans of the Gang once again. Brian Unger plays one such character with the Attorney, who the Gang often visits for legal advice only to contradict everything the lawyer has to say.

As a former correspondent of The Daily Show, Unger is really good at playing the straight man.

In fact, he’s too good, which makes it hard to believe that he would put up with these self-centered, narcissistic characters for more than a few episodes. Often, these supporting characters are revealed to be a little bit off in their own right, but Unger is just too normal to make his character mesh with the series.

14 Saved: Danny DeVito as Frank Reynolds

Danny DeVito first popped up in season two of It’s Always Sunny, and his casting as Frank Reynolds quite literally saved the series. While the higher-ups at FX reportedly loved the first season, not enough people were watching to warrant a second outing. McElhenney, Howerton, and Day were given the ultimatum to add a bigger name or face cancellation. While they worried how DeVito would fit into the series, the veteran actor has more than proven himself as a worthy member of the Gang.

The insane things that DeVito will do for the character are a testament to the actor’s commitment. Even more impressive is how you never feel like you’re watching a performance. DeVito becomes Frank Reynolds. Even when he’s not delivering lines, just watching him futz about in the background is already hilarious enough.

13 Saved: Charlie Day as Charlie Kelly

It’s Always Sunny has turned all of its leading actors into stars, but Charlie Day is the biggest breakout of them all. Since appearing on the show, Day has worked on a number of hit films, including Horrible Bosses, Pacific Rim, and The Lego Movie.

His star power has no doubt helped the show remain on the air for so long.

Thanks to Day’s performance and musical talents, the character of Charlie has no shortage of memorable moments. Bird law aside, Charlie may be the least intelligent member of the Gang. In a lot of ways, he’s the heart of the show. Charlie certainly has his share of questionable moments, but they often stem from ignorance rather than malice, which set him apart from the other employees of Paddy’s Pub.

12 Hurt: Sean “Diddy” Combs as Dr. Jinx

Whenever Sean “Diddy” Combs pops up in a movie or TV show, he often plays a fictionalized version of himself. In It’s Always Sunny, he plays the unorthodox Dr. Jinx who utilizes alternative methods to treat his patients.

Not only is the cameo distracting, but Combs’ performance is pretty flat. It almost seems like the actor is reading off cue cards, and when Dr. Jinx is seen playing the bass guitar during a musical performance at Paddy’s Pub, it’s pretty obvious that Combs isn’t actually playing. The rapper may have stolen the show as Sergio in Get Him to the Greek, but whatever worked for him on that movie isn’t back on display in the sitcom.

11 Saved: Artemis Pebdani as Artemis

Artemis is one of the few supporting characters who can actually hang with the Gang without her life coming apart at the seams. She first appeared up in season one, where she befriends Dee after the two meet in an acting class. She’s also had a relationship without Frank throughout her time in the series.

The character is portrayed by Artemis Pebdani, who landed the role right at the start of her professional acting career.

While she’s continued to reprise her part as the fun-loving and wild Artemis, the actress has enjoyed success in a number of other shows, including Scandal and Masters of Sex. Though a number of supporting characters seem to have fallen off in recent years, Artemis has already popped up this season with “The Gang Beats Boggs: Ladies Reboot”.

10 Saved: Lynne Marie Stewart and Sandy Martin as Charlie and Mac’s Moms

Every since Danny DeVito debuted as Frank Reynolds, it was abundantly clear why Dennis and Dee are they way that they are. After all, Frank is just as self-absorbed and conniving as the twins. In that respect, we’ve also gotten to see how Mac and Charlie are a result of their childhoods by getting to know their moms over the course of the series.

Lynne Marie Stewart does a perfect job of playing Charlie’s mom, a kind-hearted woman who was far too overprotective of her son — which explains Charlie’s numerous irrational fears. Meanwhile, Sandy Martin is the total opposite, as Mac’s mom doesn’t seem emotionally invested in her son at all — which explains Mac’s constant desire for approval. Together, the two are a perfect comedy duo, which is on full display in “Old Lady House: A Comedy Situation”.

9 Hurt: Seann William Scott as Country Mac

In season nine, Seann William Scott made a one episode appearance as Mac’s cousin — who the Gang deems far cooler than Mac. Just like Jason Sudeikis as Schmitty, this is another star cameo that can’t help but feel distracting. Scott has made a career playing characters who are too cool for school thanks to movies like American Pie and Role Models. That might seem like he’s the ideal fit for Country Mac.

Wouldn’t it have been even funnier if the Gang idolized a character for no other reason than to get under Mac’s skin?

With the success of It’s Always Sunny, we’re sure that they could have a star cameo every few episodes. Since they’re kept to a bare minimum, it seems that even they know these roles can be a bit ostentatious.

8 Saved: Jimmi Simpson and Nate Mooney as Liam and Ryan McPoyle

The McPoyles are the perfect example of just how dark and twisted the humor on It’s Always Sunny can actually get. They are a large inbred family with the two most prominent members, Liam and Ryan, being former classmates of the Gang. They popped up in a number of episodes between seasons one and nine, where they’re often at odds with the owners of Paddy’s Pub.

Liam and Ryan are played by Jimmi Simpson and Nate Mooney throughout their time on the show. Both fully commit to the unsettling nature of these characters. They might be creepy, but that doesn’t stop them from being a hilarious comedy duo. Our only complaint is that they’ve been absent from the series for the last few seasons.

7 Saved: Catherine Reitman as Maureen Ponderosa

One of the weirdest characters in all of It’s Always Sunny, Maureen Ponderosa is the ex-wife of Dennis Reynolds who slowly makes her transition into becoming a cat in the later episodes of the show. Much like Rickety Cricket, her transition from seemingly normal to totally unhinged takes place over the course of a few seasons — better-allowing audiences to buy into the ridiculousness of it all.

Catherine Reitman seems totally devoted to this outlandish and often unsettling performance.

Since appearing on the show, Reitman’s notoriety has only continued to grow. She currently plays the lead on Workin’ Moms — a show which she also created — along with popping up as another recurring character in Black-ish.

6 Hurt: Guillermo del Toro as Pappy McPoyle

Writer/ director Guillermo del Toro was apparently such a big fan of It’s Always Sunny, that it was one of the reasons he cast Charlie Day in Pacific Rim. In return, del Toro was given this cameo appearance as Pappy McPoyle — who is most likely the grandfather of Liam and Ryan.

One problem right off the bat is that del Toro was cast to play someone who is most likely from Ireland— a fact which the director himself made fun of in a behind-the-scenes interview. This may have been the reason that Pappy McPoyle was given such an over-the-top appearance, which is really the worst part of the character. The McPoyle’s are indeed odd and unsettling, but they’re still somewhat believable.Pappy McPoyle, on the other hand, looks like some deranged wizard who has no place in the series.

5 Saved: Wade Boggs as Himself

The best episodes of It’s Always Sunny usually finds the Gang confined to a single area, where their personalities can do nothing but bounce off the walls and wreak havoc on themselves and anyone in their vicinity. This is what makes “The Gang Beats Boggs” one of the best episodes in the series.

The episode finds the five Philadelphia natives trying to beat Wade Boggs’ record of consuming 70 drinks during a cross-country flight.

While the Gang’s antics are usually based on nothing but nonsense, this true story only adds another level of hilarity to the episodes. The cherry on top is a brief appearance by Wade Boggs himself. In an interview, Charlie Day said that not only was Boggs happy to participate in the episode, but that his real-life record was a lot more impressive than previously thought.

4 Saved: Michael Naughton as the Waiter

Michael Naughton first appeared up in “The Gang Dines Out,” where he is a server at one of the finest restaurants in Philadelphia. He’s crossed paths with the Gang a number of times since, and every time the Waiter emerges worse for wear.

Just this season, Naughton appeared in “The Gang Beats Boggs: Ladies Reboot,” where he is now working as a flight attendant. Once again, the Waiter tries to get the Gang to acknowledge how they’ve sabotaged him in the past. But once again, the Gang can’t remember who he is.

Naughton plays the Waiter with a kind of obsessive desperation beneath his everyman facade; he seems like someone who really would let the Gang get the better of him. He’s also the kind of supporting character that rewards loyal fans every time he pops back up.

3 Hurt: Stephen Collins as Bruce Mathis

Stephen Collins popped up in season two and three of It’s Always Sunny, where he played Bruce Mathis, the biological father of Dennis and Dee. Bruce invests most of his time and money helping out various charities around the world, making him a polar opposite of his children. This also made Collins — who was best known for playing Reverend Eric Camden on 7th Heaven — seem like an ideal fit for the part.

In the years since, Collins has both been accused and admitted to being an abuser. The actor has obviously not appeared on the show since, but going back and watching these episodes with Collins can be more than a little discomfiting.

2 Saved: Kaitlin Olson as Dee Reynolds

With Rob McElhenney, Charlie Day, and Glenn Howerton working on the show right from the very beginning, the actors were afforded the opportunity to mold their characters as they saw fit. However, the character of Dee Reynolds was developed before an actress was cast, and she was originally meant to be the Gang’s voice of reason.

Thankfully, Kaitlin Olson nabbed the role, and over time Dee became just as hilariously pathetic as the other members of the Gang.

Being a former member of The Groundlings, Olson clearly had talent as a comedic performer — which might also explain why Dee fancies herself as a bit of an improv comic. The actress isn’t afraid to make Dee as embarrassing as possible, which adds an element of cringe-comedy to the show that’s not found in the other characters.

1 Saved: Rob McElhenney as Mac

Without Rob McElhenney, there would be no It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. The struggling actor/writer decided to put plans for the series into motion after a number of other projects fell through. With the help of Glenn Howerton and Charlie Day, McElhenney made a short episode of the series, which he used to pitch the sitcom. Over a decade later, McElhenney still serves as an executive produces while continuing to write a number of episodes.

As far as his role of Mac is concerned, McElhenney isn’t afraid to take the character in different directions.

He put on a whopping 50 pounds for season seven and Mac finally came out of the closet for good last year — just a few of the many ways McElhenney has kept the show feeling fresh after thirteen seasons.

 —

Who’s your favorite actor on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia? Let us know!



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2018-10-07 02:10:26 – Dylan Dembrow

A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad (And Always Has Been)

WARNING: Major spoilers for A Star Is Born

A Star Is Born‘s ending undoes what could have been a Hollywood classic – but that’s not exactly Bradley Cooper’s fault. From its first version in 1937, A Star Is Born has always had a problematic resolution to its story, one that’s only got worse over the past century, and this latest version is no different.

A Star Is Born is a classic story that Hollywood loves so much it’s told it four times (with a suspiciously-similar earlier version, several failed attempts and many, many imitators). A top-of-his-game star (in 2018, Bradley Cooper’s rock star Jackson Maine) is suffering from alcoholism and in a stupor discovers a struggling artist (Lady Gaga as Ally, a waitress moonlighting in a drag bar), falling in love with both her and her talent. He provides her with a big break, sending her fame into the stratosphere just as his addictions begin to derail his career. The pair marry, but despite their love things begin to fray.

Related: Read Our A Star Is Born Review

It’s a tale of rags to riches, of falls from grace, of the power of love, and personal identity within all of that. And, for much of the runtime, A Star Is Born 2018 is genuinely a great version of all those stories. Gaga’s first major concert leaves you floating, Cooper shows mental affliction with grace, both perform their songs incredibly (to actual live crowds, no less), and are utterly believable as troubled lovers. It is, for much of its runtime, a very good film worthy of that deafening hype.

However, everything implodes into a black hole of pretentiousness as what could have been a great film its own right has to follow through on being called A Star Is Born

  • This Page: The Problem With A Star Is Born’s Ending
  • Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad
  • Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

What Happens In A Star Is Born’s Ending

We’ll stick with Cooper’s take for now before going deeper into the past. A Star Is Born‘s third act is kicked off by Ally winning the Grammy for Best New Artist – a major step for her career, undercut entirely by Jack drunkenly taking to the stage with her and relieving himself on live TV. He goes into rehab and she wrestles with where her focus should lie, eventually deciding to try and protect her recovering husband. She cancels her European tour when her agent, Rez, blocks the duo playing together.

As a result, Jack kills himself. He’s confronted by a seething Rez who has no sympathies or expectations of sobriety and states outright Jack’s ruining his wife’s career. When she matter-of-fact states the tour cancellation, he sees the impact of his actions and, while she plays a concert, he hangs himself in their garage.

Related: Every Song On A Star Is Born’s Soundtrack

This breaks Ally at first, leaving her emotionally distraught, before her understanding the meaning of Jack’s sacrifice – to enable her to truly become the star he always saw – helps her pull through. The film ends at a tribute concert in Jack’s memory. “My name is Ally Maine.” she declares before singing “I’ll Never Love Again”, a song based on their relationship they wrote together while he was recovering. A flashback shows the pair singing, she looks through the camera at the audience, the end.

Why A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad

Removing the ending of all presentation and self-imposed importance (a character looking into the camera at the end is an overused trope that Cooper simply doesn’t earn), in just writing down the events of A Star Is Born its problems should be obvious.

Jack decides to kill himself to save his wife, committing suicide because it’s the only way to set her free. This comes about two hours into a film which has slowly built up its numerous interpersonal relationships, and so comes as a drastic and rather unearned turn. Now, there is an argument to be made about accuracy to the unpredictability of mental illness, but given the intimacy audiences had with both Jack and Ally up until this moment, that doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. A Star Is Born, plainly, presents suicide as the only way out. It’s meant to come across as a selfless act but still values success as a true route to happiness, meaning anything emotional about the “gesture” is laced with hypocrisy.

But it’s what comes after and Ally’s coming to terms with her loss that’s so disquieting. For all her innate talent being the drive of the story and her freely made decision to step back what motivated Jack to kill himself, the final scene makes everything about Jack; the mononymous singer for the first time takes on her husband’s surname at his concert, where she performs a song that he helped her write in her original singer style. The suggestion is meant to be that Jack was holding her back, but in the shadow of the previous two hours the strange implication is that the act of a true star being born came from the adversity of Jack’s sacrifice. Making Ally’s success symbiotic to her dead husband is already heavily in the text of the film, but the final scene makes her final ascension even more indebted to his drastic act.

It’s hard to not read A Star Is Born‘s ending as trivializing suicide down to a plot point to give the fundamentally broken male lead the defining role in its female protagonist’s arc. It’s a weird move to make in 2018, although don’t believe this is just the product of an 80-year-old movie being remade. There’s something flawed at the heart of A Star Is Born.

Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad

The True Story Behind A Star Is Born’s Ending Explains The Problem

There have been four versions of A Star Is Born: the 1937 Hollywood-skewering original starring Janet Gaynor and Frederick March, the 1954 musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 shift to the music industry with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the latest Cooper/Gaga release. Each one has its own quirks, but all endeavor to tell the same story of love and fame intertwined, and all have the same basic ending. But the 1937 version isn’t the start. While A Star Is Born‘s narrative is a fiction, it’s very much based on truth; each movie is rooted heavily in the entertainment industry of the time – Hollywood for the 1937 and 1954 versions, music for 1976 and 2018 – and aims to tell an encapsulating story. There are some real-life events that inspired it.

The established star falling for an unknown as she climbs to the top was seen in actors Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay’s relationship, with the pair marrying in 1928 when the former was an unknown after starring in a Broadway show together. Their marriage fell apart after she rose above him and he fell into alcoholism. They separated in 1935 after seven years of marriage, two years before A Star Is Born was released. This appears to have been composited with the death of silent film actor John Bowers, who died at sea in 1936 after failing to win a part (whether it was a suicide or not is unclear). There are others (as we’ll see) but these are regarded as the ones who powered the 1937 version.

Related: Lady Gaga Fans Are Trolling Venom With Fake Bad Reviews

Of course, there’s one key distinction between inspiration and movie: in real life, it was two unrelated stories. There are the famous lovers who piggyback success and the past-it star who takes his own life, but in all cases these two aspects are entirely independent; the woman goes on to greater success by cutting the man out, while elsewhere another man falls from grace. Both stories epitomize Hollywood together, and taken alongside each other rather than melded have an ingrained believability. A Star Is Born trades that for something more streamlined in having the suicide be the culmination of the romance, but it’s also idealistic and wistful, losing the real moral of either.

This is reflected in what is regarded as a proto-Star Is Born, the 1932 film What Price Hollywood? Released five years before the 1937 version and produced also by David O. Selznick (and directed by George Cukor, who was approached for the first A Star Is Born and directed the first remake), this is regarded as something of a dry run at the story. Obviously from the release year it can’t share the same real-life inspirations (although, because this is the Golden Age of Hollywood, there are others pointed to), but the core concept and even smaller story beats are there, albeit with one massive difference: the leads are not romantically involved. Lowell Sherman’s Max drunkenly finds Constance Bennett’s Mary and helps make her a star, eventually killing himself after he sees realizes how far he’s fallen and is hurting his friend, while Mary’s suffers an ill-fated marriage that breaks down due to her absences filming and is reconciled at the end.

Watched today, What Price Hollywood? has a cynicism about the film industry ahead of its time despite ultimately being a movie romanticizing Hollywood – and at the core of this is the tragic story of Max and its impact on Mary’s life. The title question is apt.

How The Remakes Have Tried To “Fix” The Ending

In contrast to What Price Hollywood?, A Star Is Born 1937 carries a self-awareness and charm, but in bridging the romantic and the career side of protagonist Esther creates the problematic suicide reading. It’s not helped by dated elements, including the defining part of Esther’s ascension being the actress known as Vicki Lester taking on her husband’s name with a declaration “This is Mrs. Norman Maine“. It works given the time period, but even 16 years later needed an update.

Related: Watch the Trailer For A Star Is Born

The 1954 version is, for the most part, a beat-for-beat remake, just with dance number expansion to make it a musical, but it does make some strides to justifying the ending. The toll that caring for a drunk has on Judy Garland’s Vicki Lester is shown gradually, most upsettingly in an off-stage breakdown she immediately returns to filming from: an unavoidable presentation of the line between art and performer. But, ultimately, it ends in the same way: Norman Maine overhears Vicki’s plans to quit acting to care for her husband, so he feigns going for a swim and drowns himself; after a traumatic period and being unmasked at her funeral (the invasion of the press), Vicki returns to the public eye where she declares herself “Mrs. Norman Maine“. Every issue discussed is here.

The 1976’s A Star Is Born is overall incredibly melodramatic, nowhere less than its handling of the ending. What it should be praised for is its attempts at giving the female lead a greater sense of autonomy: throughout Streisand’s Esther makes decisions that power the narrative, not just being led along by Kristoffersen as those who came before her, but that’s lost thuddingly in the finale. After his meltdown, John Howard has imposed isolation – not rehab – and when returning home immediately sleeps with a reporter wanting an interview for Esther. The couple tries to power past this, but John figures he’s still broken and crashes his car at high speeds. Again, Esther is sad before taking his name (and singing at a tribute event).

Like we’ve already explored with A Star Is Born 2018, all versions have tried to provide their own contemporary spin on the tale to iron out its kinks, yet all wind up having to repeat the same suicide-anger-name triple-tap that doesn’t belong. A degree can be accounted to the changing times, but that ignores that the original trio of movies released over nearly 40 years, and that Cooper wasn’t able to address it either.

Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

Why Bradley Cooper Can’t Fix A Star Is Born

Bradley Cooper certainly tries to bring a modern slant to the worn tale of A Star Is Born. He invests heavily in making Jack and Ally’s opposite trajectories operate independently – Jack is suffering from tinnitus before he’s heard a note of “La Vie En Rose”, while Ally’s SNL appearance is deemed to contradict his advice – while making the love story more immediate. It’s a bigger story, more personal and considerably more consummately paced.

But, like all the others, the ending hits a snag. And some of his decisions make it worse. The method of final descent is different, with the awards show upset and rehab undone not by Maine going off the rails again as in every other take, but rather by Ally’s agent calling his supposed bluff. It’s implied from the British Rez knowing when exactly Jackson first toured across the pond that he was once a fan, now disillusioned with his hero, making him a millennial scapegoat to any affronting reading.

Related: 2018 Fall Movie Preview: The 30 Films to See

This generational push and pull could have been what sent A Star Is Born to greatness. Sam Elliott’s speech about there only being twelve notes played over and over, with the majesty coming from how the artist uses them is a beautiful sentiment that sees Cooper self-justifying another remake and appears like a zen view on the entertainment business that birthed it. Except it isn’t, because this idea is also trying to explain the ending, claiming that the music industry is cyclical and that stars are born and then new stars are born later; Jack’s death is enabling that. What the film seems to miss is that for one state to ever enter another, a star must always die. Ally will fall too. The raw textual argument is that the failures are as eternal as the successes, raising the question of worth, yet the film provides no further exploration and presents it as somehow immediately uplifting.

And that’s the hump that A Star Is Born 2018, like its predecessors, can’t get over. The story thinks it’s a biting, self-aware take on itself, but it’s too close to the subject to see that it’s really just propagating a harsh cycle. This isn’t helped by the film being weighted by so much – the casting of Lady Gaga, his writer-director-producer-actor whammy, even Sam Elliott as the Sam Elliott-type – although those concerns are also the key explanation for what’s really going on.

A Star Is Born Only Exists Because Of Ego

Throughout this article, there’s been one question dangling unspoken. Why are there four versions of A Star Is Born anyway? It’s a story that is flawed and dated, on a topic which has been tackled in more films than any other. Yes, each movie got serious Oscar nominations and wins, but that alone isn’t enough to justify going back. The true answer is enlightening.

1954’s A Star Is Born was conceived as a bid to restart Judy Garland’s career after it stalled over the 1940s. 1976’s A Star Is Born was Barbra Streisand’s attempt (along with then-husband Jon Peters) to boost her standing in Hollywood. And 2018’s A Star Is Born is Bradley Cooper’s grand attempt to win the Oscar that he believes he deserves (his entire post-Hangover career is a carefully played game of chess with a Golden Baldie the King). There are studio concerns too (before Cooper, Warner Bros had been attempting to get a remake off the ground since the early 2010s, although as a Beyonce vehicle has the same career expansion goals), but those are the primary purposes of each version. A Star Is Born is a vanity project on repeat.

Related: A Star Is Born Is An Oscar Favorite – But Could An Infamous Producer Hurt Its Chances?

Now, vanity projects needn’t be bad, and indeed a lot of good comes from each of these attempts. Indeed, each was ultimately successful in both their primary and commercial goals: Garland’s career was rejuvenated; Streisand won her second Oscar; and Cooper’s currently the front-runner in multiple categories for next year’s Academy Awards.

But this aspect appears to be why each version of A Star Is Born struggles to understand the real meaning of its ending. Each powering force believes this movie will be what takes them being a Norman/Jack Maine to a new Esther/Ally while missing that it’s built into the story to be impossible. They believe so much in the two contradictory Hollywood legends wholesale, so don’t see that the story is almost warning against such a thing.

A Star Is Born Is No Longer Needed

In recent years, we’ve seen Hollywood’s reliable rotation of movies about itself take a genuinely incisive slant. 2015’s Best Picture Winner Birdman was an ostentatious exploration of ego that too ended with the protagonist committing suicide, but there it was with the wry critique that fame and adoration are fleeting and that such a bold act was the only way for the self-involved hero to reach the heights he dreamed of. Then there’s 2017’s almost-Best Picture Winner La La Land, which was a celebration of Hollywood-gone-by looking at love in a city of stars, eventually concluding that success required the sacrifice of the central relationship.

Together, these take on all the ideas that A Star Is Born is playing with and apply them in a more thoughtful way. The messages are more widely applicable and their endnotes have considerably less of the hypocrisy. Birdman and La La Land may find joy in the arts, but they also uncover the trials of creativity and fame, keeping the brutal truths in earshot while presenting from a position of success.

A Star Is Born 2018 is a good movie, an undeniable achievement for both Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. But there is a flaw at the heart of the tale that just doesn’t ring true. Unless it’s made with a completely revisionist, ego-less eye, in twenty years we do not need another one.

More: Every Version Of A Star Is Born Ranked, From Garland To Gaga



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2018-10-06 01:10:52 – Alex Leadbeater

Jim Parsons Pens Letter to Fans & Cast After Big Bang Theory Cancellation



The actor behind Sheldon Cooper, Jim Parsons, has written an emotional letter to the fans and cast of The Big Bang Theory following the announcement that the show would be coming to an end. Set to air its 12th and final season next month, Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady’s The Big Bang Theory tells the story of four geeks who gradually learn to interact outside of their own individual comfort zones, largely thanks to the appearance of a waitress/aspiring actress called Penny who befriends the group. The sitcom has become one of the most popular and successful comedy series of all time, picking up numerous Emmy gongs along the way and launching the spinoff series Young Sheldon in 2017.

This week however, it was announced that The Big Bang Theory would be brought to a close, the reason for which reportedly being that actor Parsons was unwilling to renew his contract and that producers felt the show could not continue without the presence of Sheldon Cooper. Several actors have already publicly addressed the news, with Mayim Bialik, who plays Sheldon’s wife on the show, expressing her sadness at the decision.

Related: Macaulay Culkin Explains Why He Turned Down Starring In Big Bang Theory

Parsons himself has now spoken out about the end of The Big Bang Theory by posting an emotional letter to both fans and fellow cast members on his Instagram. Alongside a picture of the main cast, Parsons writes:

“It is hard (nearly impossible actually) to really accept that this is a picture of the first of the final 24 episodes we will shoot for The Big Bang Theory. I feel very fortunate that we have another 23 episodes to shoot this season because I am hopeful that with each and every one, my level of REALLY accepting this fact will sink in. Something else I feel grateful for – and this gratitude needs no time to “sink in” or becoming more “realized;” this grateful feeling is always with me but is multiplied in this moment of us announcing our final season – but I feel such intense gratitude for our devoted viewers who are the ACTUAL reason we have been graced with the opportunity to explore these characters for 12 years of our lives.

I feel grateful to our crew – many, many of whom have been with us since day one – and who are the people who bring a sense of steadiness and dependability, who are so warm and kind and always quick to say hello and smile at us every time we come to the set and who, even though you don’t see them on TV, are in many ways the real and steady heartbeat that keeps this body of work alive and breathing while we, like flailing arms and legs, act like jackasses and fools in attempt to make someone laugh.

I am grateful to all the writers of the show – those with us now and those that have come and gone – because, without them, there would literally be no Big Bang Theory at all, ever. The writers thought of this show, the writers created these characters, the writers are the ones who found ways to keep coming up with organic, entertaining ways to keep the life of this show going which is a task much, much more challenging than anyone other than them will ever know or understand.

And while I know that they already know it, it bears repeating again and again: I am so terribly grateful for the cast in this picture and the cast members who aren’t pictured here – whether they were in one scene or many episodes along the way; you are all my playmates that I have fallen in love with and who have become a part of my life on set and off. You are my playmates when we don’t feel like playing but have to because it’s our job to get out there and communicate and pretend we’re these other fictional people and we look into each other’s eyes and say these words and end up creating this weird, other reality that has enriched my life more than I will ever fully understand. I will miss of all you and all of this more than I can say and more than I can know at this time.”

The letter certainly covers all bases as far as thanking fans and colleagues goes and given how long Parsons, and indeed many of the cast, have been playing these roles, it’s understandable that the end of The Big Bang Theory is taking an emotional toll on those involved. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Parsons doesn’t address whether or not it was his decision to leave the show that triggered this situation, nor does he offer any clear reasons as to why he wanted out. His comment regarding the writers having a tough challenge in keeping the show constantly fresh could be a subtle hint, however.

In either case, this move has arguably been on the cards for quite some time. Over recent seasons, there have been numerous reports of contract disputes between the core cast of The Big Bang Theory, with actors supposedly coming close to walking away on several occasions. The Big Bang Theory has also come under increasing scrutiny from viewers and has been frequently criticized for a formulaic approach and a lack of original ideas in later seasons. Some even feel that the show too often relies on stereotypes of geek culture, race or medical conditions such as Asperger’s syndrome as the source of its humor.

More: Big Bang Theory Season 12 Will Feature A Direct Young Sheldon Connection

The Big Bang Theory season 12 premieres September 24th on CBS.

Source: Jim Parsons





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