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Avengers: Endgame Draft Teamed Captain America Up With Red Skull

Avengers: Endgame scriptwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely have revealed that they considered teaming up Captain America and the Red Skull. Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame were always envisioned as the climax of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a celebration of the shared universe Marvel had built over the course of the last decade.

The two films saw the MCU’s greatest heroes team up against the threat of Thanos, the Mad Titan who was determined to erase half the life in the universe with a snap of his fingers. The most exciting possibilities were unexpected, unprecedented team-ups; Iron Man working with Doctor Strange, War Machine with Rocket Raccoon from the Guardians of the Galaxy, and of course the assembled might of Captain Marvel and the A-Force.

Related: Comic-Con 2019: The Best Movie/TV Panels (& What Will Be Revealed)

But Marvel considered some even more unusual team-ups. Speaking at a dedicated “Writing Avengers: Endgame” panel at San Diego Comic-Con 2019 (via CBR), Markus and McFeely revealed that Marvel considered forcing Captain America and the Red Skull to work together. Marvel had composed a so-called “Manifesto” of loose ends that the writers could tie together through time travel, and the Red Skull was numbered among them. “In the manifesto document, there was one theory that [it was] Cap who goes to space,” Markus remembered, “and he has to collaborate with Red Skull to get the Stone.” While it was an interesting idea, it was never developed.

Captain America: The First Avenger was Markus and McFeely’s first script for Marvel Studios, and Markus noted that they’d always had a vague idea that the Red Skull could return. “We did send him to space and send him away very much on purpose,” he noted, although he confessed at the time he had no idea where the Red Skull had been transported by the Tesseract.

It sounds as though Marvel never really developed the idea of a Captain America/Red Skull team-up; in fact, the idea seems to predate the concept of “a soul for a soul,” that a sacrifice has to be made by anyone who seeks to acquire the Soul Stone. As Markus and McFeely developed the idea of the Soul Stone and worked out how it fit into their plot, they saw another role for the Red Skull; he could have been transported to Vormir, where he had become guardian of the Soul Stone. Over the years, the Red Skull’s proximity to the Soul Stone had led to his very soul being consumed, and he was left just a shadow of a man. By the time Steve Rogers arrived on Vormir returning the Soul Stone at the end of Avengers: Endgame, it’s possible the Red Skull wouldn’t even have recognized him – or cared about him.

More: Why Marvel Recast Red Skull For Avengers: Infinity War

Source: CBR


2019-07-19 01:07:19

Thomas Bacon

Spider-Man: Far From Home’s Fury & Captain Marvel Moment Makes No Sense

Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s shout-out to Captain Marvel is arguably the movie’s most confusing moment. Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) barked at Peter Parker (Tom Holland) for even mentioning Carol Danvers but, in light of the revelation that Talos the Skrull (Ben Mendelsohn) was posing as Fury all along in Spider-Man: Far From Home, his reaction to Peter asking about Captain Marvel takes on an entirely different context – although it still doesn’t entirely make sense.

Picking up in 2o24, eight months after Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home spotlights how the Marvel Cinematic Universe is dealing with the aftermath of The Blip, which is the new name for Thanos’ snap. For Peter, the summer after Avengers: Endgame was a chance to go on a European vacation with his friends and tell MJ (Zendaya) how he feels about her – until Nick Fury sabotages Peter’s holiday and recruits Spider-Man to help Quentin Beck aka Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) save the world. Of course, it turns out the global crisis of other-dimensional Elemental monsters was created by the real villain, Mysterio, to trick the world so he can become the new Iron Man, i.e. the world’s greatest superhero.

Related: Spider-Man: Far From Home’s 20 Biggest Unanswered Questions

But before Peter found out the truth about Beck, he was reluctantly tapped by Fury and brought to the spy’s operating base in Venice, Italy. Once he understood that fighting the Elementals would pull Peter away from what he really wanted – a vacation with his friends and his romantic chance with MJ – Spider-Man bowed out of the mission and suggested some alternate choices, like Thor, who is in outer space, and Doctor Strange, who is “unavailable”. But when Peter mentioned Captain Marvel, Fury/Talos snapped, “Don’t invoke her name!

The line plays as one of Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s many jokes and MCU references, but is there a deeper reason for Fury/Talos’ curious response to invoking Captain Marvel’s name? One way to look at it is that Talos is intensely loyal to Captain Marvel and, given what Talos and the Skrulls owe her, it’s understandable why the affable shapeshifter would be protective of Carol Danvers. Indeed, Carol turned against the Kree Starforce (who were manipulating her and keeping her powers in check) and fought on the side of the Skrulls, who were being exterminated by the Kree. Captain Marvel ended with Carol escorting the Skrulls to find a new homeworld in another part of the universe. Essentially, Captain Marvel reunited Talos with his wife Soren (Sharon Blynn) and saved his people so it’s natural the Skrull would feel he owes her everything.

And perhaps, having knowledge of how busy Danvers is (as evidenced by Captain Marvel missing much of Avengers: Endgame so that she can police the galaxy), Talos simply felt she shouldn’t need to be bothered by coming back to Earth to deal with the Elementals, especially when the Terran homeworld has the Avengers and other superheroes to call upon – like Spider-Man.

However, there’s another potential way to look at Fury/ Talos getting angry at Peter mentioning Captain Marvel: what if the Skrull is actually angry at her for some unknown reason? After all, the events of Captain Marvel occurred in 1995, which was 29 years before Spider-Man: Far From Home. A lot of things could have transpired between Talos/the Skrulls and Carol Danvers during those three decades and we know Talos returned to Earth and became Nick Fury’s double for an unknown amount of time, along with Soren, who poses as Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders). The real Fury is, in fact, working with the Skrulls on a secret mission in outer space, possibly to establish S.W.O.R.D., the outer-space version of S.H.I.E.L.D., in order to counteract Kree sleeper cells on Earth.

Therefore, it’s possible that at some point between 1995 and 2024, Captain Marvel and Talos had a falling out or that whatever the Skrulls and the real Nick Fury are working on is something they don’t necessarily want to involve Carol Danvers. While there isn’t much info to go on, trying to understand the context of why Fury/Talos wanted Captain Marvel’s name kept off the table is the only way to make that moment in Spider-Man: Far From Home make sense.

Next: Spider-Man: Far From Home Ending Explained (In Detail)


2019-07-14 02:07:24

John Orquiola

Spider-Man: Far From Home’s Fury & Captain Marvel Moment Makes No Sense

Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s shout-out to Captain Marvel is arguably the movie’s most confusing moment. Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) barked at Peter Parker (Tom Holland) for even mentioning Carol Danvers but, in light of the revelation that Talos the Skrull (Ben Mendelsohn) was posing as Fury all along in Spider-Man: Far From Home, his reaction to Peter asking about Captain Marvel takes on an entirely different context – although it still doesn’t entirely make sense.

Picking up in 2o24, eight months after Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home spotlights how the Marvel Cinematic Universe is dealing with the aftermath of The Blip, which is the new name for Thanos’ snap. For Peter, the summer after Avengers: Endgame was a chance to go on a European vacation with his friends and tell MJ (Zendaya) how he feels about her – until Nick Fury sabotages Peter’s holiday and recruits Spider-Man to help Quentin Beck aka Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) save the world. Of course, it turns out the global crisis of other-dimensional Elemental monsters was created by the real villain, Mysterio, to trick the world so he can become the new Iron Man, i.e. the world’s greatest superhero.

Related: Spider-Man: Far From Home’s 20 Biggest Unanswered Questions

But before Peter found out the truth about Beck, he was reluctantly tapped by Fury and brought to the spy’s operating base in Venice, Italy. Once he understood that fighting the Elementals would pull Peter away from what he really wanted – a vacation with his friends and his romantic chance with MJ – Spider-Man bowed out of the mission and suggested some alternate choices, like Thor, who is in outer space, and Doctor Strange, who is “unavailable”. But when Peter mentioned Captain Marvel, Fury/Talos snapped, “Don’t invoke her name!

The line plays as one of Spider-Man: Far From Home‘s many jokes and MCU references, but is there a deeper reason for Fury/Talos’ curious response to invoking Captain Marvel’s name? One way to look at it is that Talos is intensely loyal to Captain Marvel and, given what Talos and the Skrulls owe her, it’s understandable why the affable shapeshifter would be protective of Carol Danvers. Indeed, Carol turned against the Kree Starforce (who were manipulating her and keeping her powers in check) and fought on the side of the Skrulls, who were being exterminated by the Kree. Captain Marvel ended with Carol escorting the Skrulls to find a new homeworld in another part of the universe. Essentially, Captain Marvel reunited Talos with his wife Soren (Sharon Blynn) and saved his people so it’s natural the Skrull would feel he owes her everything.

And perhaps, having knowledge of how busy Danvers is (as evidenced by Captain Marvel missing much of Avengers: Endgame so that she can police the galaxy), Talos simply felt she shouldn’t need to be bothered by coming back to Earth to deal with the Elementals, especially when the Terran homeworld has the Avengers and other superheroes to call upon – like Spider-Man.

However, there’s another potential way to look at Fury/ Talos getting angry at Peter mentioning Captain Marvel: what if the Skrull is actually angry at her for some unknown reason? After all, the events of Captain Marvel occurred in 1995, which was 29 years before Spider-Man: Far From Home. A lot of things could have transpired between Talos/the Skrulls and Carol Danvers during those three decades and we know Talos returned to Earth and became Nick Fury’s double for an unknown amount of time, along with Soren, who poses as Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders). The real Fury is, in fact, working with the Skrulls on a secret mission in outer space, possibly to establish S.W.O.R.D., the outer-space version of S.H.I.E.L.D., in order to counteract Kree sleeper cells on Earth.

Therefore, it’s possible that at some point between 1995 and 2024, Captain Marvel and Talos had a falling out or that whatever the Skrulls and the real Nick Fury are working on is something they don’t necessarily want to involve Carol Danvers. While there isn’t much info to go on, trying to understand the context of why Fury/Talos wanted Captain Marvel’s name kept off the table is the only way to make that moment in Spider-Man: Far From Home make sense.

Next: Spider-Man: Far From Home Ending Explained (In Detail)


2019-07-14 02:07:24

John Orquiola

Captain America’s Solo Trilogy: 5 Things It Did Right (& 5 It Did Wrong)

The Marvel Cinematic Universe began as Tony Stark’s franchise. The other heroes each had a chance to shine, but Stark was the anchor pulling the whole thing together. However, as soon as the Russo brothers took over the Captain America movies, Steve Rogers became just as important as Stark.

RELATED: The Avengers: 10 Best Candidates to Replace Captain America as Leader

It is the dichotomy between these two characters that has formed the backbone of the MCU for a good few years. It all began when the Russos showed up to get Cap’s solo franchise into shape. Here are 5 Things Captain America’s Solo Trilogy Did Right (And 5 It Did Wrong).

10 Wrong: Generic origin story

While Captain America: The First Avenger isn’t a terrible movie – it’s actually, all things considered, a pretty good one – there’s no denying that it follows the MCU’s set-menu origin story formula.

We meet Steve Rogers as a young man searching for his purpose. He has an older, wiser mentor figure who offers him the chance to fulfill his destiny. The mentor figure dies, which pushes him to fulfill that destiny. Everything’s going great until a villain shows up with similar powers to Steve and he’s finally met his match. The only non-generic thing about it is the fact that the hero is catapulted into the future at the end.

9 Right: Cap’s character arc

Captain America’s character arc as a whole lasted until Avengers: Endgame, but there is an internal one in his solo trilogy and it’s terrific. In The First Avenger, Steve is willing to do anything for his government. In The Winter Soldier, that government betrays him and he realizes he can only trust himself.

In Civil War, he actively fights against the government’s attempts to regulate his actions. The final moments of Civil War see Steve arriving at the Raft to break his allies out of prison. There’s no way we could imagine the Steve we first met doing that, yet it doesn’t feel out of character when we see it. That’s what character development looks like.

8 Wrong: Villains

The Captain America trilogy has never had particularly good villains. Despite Red Skull being Cap’s primary villain in the comics, he just came off as lame in The First Avenger.

It was an intriguing turning of the tables to have Cap’s best friend become the villain in The Winter Soldier, but ultimately, Bucky wasn’t the real villain of that movie; Alexander Pierce was, and he was another generic MCU villain with vague motivations for evil. Finally, Helmut Zemo was woefully underused in Civil War, since the focus was on the Avengers’ animosity towards each other, while his “getting caught was all a part of my plan” schtick has been done a thousand times before.

7 Right: Steve’s friendship with Sam

When we catch up with Steve Rogers in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, we truly see him as a man out of his time. He’s trying to get by, but it’s not easy, because all of his friends and family are dead and he doesn’t recognize the world. And then he meets Sam Wilson, a fellow vet who is similarly struggling to fit in.

RELATED: 10 Things We Want To See From Sam Wilson’s Captain America

Sam wasn’t frozen for 70 years, but he did go to war and return home to find that he had no place, so the two can relate to each other. Chris Evans and Anthony Mackie have fantastic chemistry and Cap’s solo movies have used this well.

6 Wrong: Steve’s romance with Sharon

In the years between Cap going into the ice and missing his date with Peggy and his trip back to the ‘40s to spend his whole life with her, Marvel didn’t really know what to do with his romantic arc. So, they put him in a weird, kind of creepy, pseudo-incestuous relationship with Peggy’s great-niece, Sharon.

Fans were never on board with this pairing, and it seems right that the MCU just sort of forgot about it. It’s even worse in retrospect, since we now know that Steve would eventually go back in time, marry Peggy, and technically become Sharon’s great uncle.

5 Right: Upping the stakes in the second movie

All these years later, Captain America: The Winter Soldier still stands as one of the best movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

It suitably upped the stakes following The First Avenger, with Steve Rogers adjusting to life in the modern world, losing his trust in the government he served (the only thing he had left), and coming face-to-face with the ultimate villain: his childhood best friend who he thought had died 70 years earlier and had been brainwashed by Nazi scientists to assassinate him. The Winter Soldier solidified Cap’s place as one of the MCU’s most well-defined and interesting characters.

4 Wrong: Third acts (except for Civil War)

The third act of Civil War is spectacular, with the conflict of the movie being stripped down to its essential elements: Tony finding out Bucky killed his parents, Tony wanting revenge, and Cap standing in his way as he’s torn between his best friend and his closest ally.

RELATED: 10 MCU Moments That Prove Captain America Was Always Worthy Of Mjolnir

But the third act of The First Avenger feels rushed in order to get Cap in the ice and send him into the modern day, while the third act of The Winter Soldier takes the paranoid political thriller build-up and tosses it out in favor of an all-too-familiar CGI smash-‘em-up for the final battle.

3 Right: Final lines of dialogue

The final line of dialogue in a movie is incredibly important, because they’re the words stuck in your head as you leave the theater and head home. The MCU understands this, and it’s never been on finer display than in the Captain America movies. At the end of The First Avenger, Steve finds himself hopelessly confused in 21st century New York and Nick Fury asks him if he’s going to be okay. Steve responds, “Yeah, I just…I had a date.”

His first thought is that he’s missed his chance with Peggy. At the end of The Winter Soldier, Steve tells Sam he doesn’t have to help him look for Bucky and Sam says, “I know. When do we start?” And at the end of Civil War, Steve sends Tony a letter that concludes, “No matter what, I promise you, if you need us, if you need me…I’ll be there.” Powerful stuff.

2 Wrong: Making Civil War pretty much an Avengers movie

Captain America: Civil War is often referred to as Avengers 2.5, because Iron Man, Black Panther, Hawkeye, Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Scarlet Witch are as much a part of the plot as Cap is. While Civil War is, at heart, still a Captain America movie, it doesn’t feel like a true solo movie in the sense that The Winter Soldier does. Civil War is bigger than Captain America, and that’s its biggest problem.

That story needed to be told – the Avengers had to break up before Thanos showed up, because that’s how Thanos won – but maybe it shouldn’t have been a Cap solo movie. Cap deserved a true closer to his solo trilogy.

1 Right: Completing the Cap/Bucky arc

The MCU as a whole gives us a rounded portrait of Steve Rogers and a complete, fleshed-out character arc, but the Captain America solo trilogy focused more specifically on his friendship with Bucky.

In the first one, they fought in World War II together and Bucky “died,” spurring Cap on to sacrifice himself. In the second one, Bucky returns as a brainwashed assassin out to kill Cap. In the third one, the Avengers are torn apart and the UN pokes around in superheroes’ business. But despite the epic scale, it still didn’t lose sight of the focus on the Cap/Bucky arc and gave it some closure, which is pretty admirable.

NEXT: Captain America: 8 Ways Chris Evans Can Still Play Steve Rogers In Another MCU Movie


2019-07-13 11:07:27

Ben Sherlock

Captain Marvel: 10 Things In The Movie That Only Make Sense If You Read The Comics

The first Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) to debut in 2019 was Captain Marvel, the origin movie for the titular superhero and (technically) a prequel to The Avengers. The movie tells how the defiant airforce pilot Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) became Capt. Marvel – the strongest Avenger and possibly one of the most powerful beings in the whole universe.

But in her move from the pages of a comic book to the big screen, Capt. Marvel changed a lot and left a lot of interesting and important details in translation. While these changes aren’t detrimental to her presence in the MCU, their absences make certain events and abilities a bit hard to understand. Here are 10 things in Captain Marvel that only make sense if you read the comics.

RELATED: 10 Strongest Female Marvel Characters

10 The Kree-Skrull War

From the day that she started fighting for the Kree, Capt. Marvel was told that their duty was to exterminate the shapeshifting Skrulls. The Krees’ irrational hatred of the Skrulls is briefly mentioned in the movie – where it’s revealed that the Skrulls are war refugees being oppressed by the Kree – but the comics provide a different in-depth explanation.

The races have been at war for generations and their conflict hit a boiling point when the Kree attacked a Skrull solar system. Desperate, the Skrulls called the Avengers for help while the half-Kree Capt. Marvel begrudgingly sided with the Kree.

9 Goose’s Digestive Tract

Capt. Marvel’s cat Goose isn’t just an ordinary pet because it’s actually a Flerken: an alien that hides giant tentacles, fangs and hundreds of its eggs within its body. It also just so happens to look like a regular Earth cat.

Flerkens’ stomachs are also known to be pocket realities that can hold and digest pretty much anything, including objects and beings larger than it. This is how Goose can store her tentacles in her small frame and swallow the Tesseract before puking it out without suffering any major damage despite eating an Infinity Stone.

8 The Source Of Her Powers

In the movie, Carol Danvers becomes Capt. Marvel after an experimental engine powered by the Tesseract’s energies explodes in her face. Miraculously, she isn’t harmed and instead receives incredible superpowers.

Similarly, Capt. Marvel gets her powers from a Kree device in the comics but this time it’s from the Psyche-Magnitron – something designed to bestow superpowers to a designated target or user from the start. As a result, Capt. Marvel gained super strength, flight, enhanced senses, photonic blasts, and more following the life-threatening incident.

7 Her Inhibited Strength

Capt. Marvel is one of the most powerful superheroes in both the comics and the MCU. Her raw power surpasses even the cosmic scales, which is why a measly Kree inhibitor keeping her in check didn’t make much sense.

The only way this could be justified is if Capt. Marvel was brainwashed, which happened a lot in the early comics. To subdue her, villains like the Brood, MODOK, and Supreme Intelligence convinced Carol that she wasn’t that powerful. The Kree in the movie had it easy since Carol lost her memories in the blast, making her conditioning less troublesome.

6 Her Nigh-Invulnerability

Over the course of her movie. Capt. Marvel takes a lot of punishment from either Kree soldiers or ships and barely receives a scratch. This isn’t the result of luck, but her passive superhuman abilities in action.

Not only can she absorb energy and force before firing it back at its source, but she also has a quick-acting healing factor that allows her to recuperate in the heat of battle. This could help explain how she effortlessly wiped out a Kree war fleet while tanking Thanos’ Hulk-stopping punches and a Power Stone blast later in Endgame.

RELATED: Every Single Avengers Movie (In Chronological Order)

5 Her Photon Blasts

It’s unclear what exactly the Tesseract’s energies did to Capt. Marvel and how they gave her an assortment of powers, one of which is the ability to fire concentrated photon shots from her hands.

A possible explanation lies in the comics, specifically when the Brood experimented on her and gave her the ability to manipulate the stars’ energies into photon blasts. This is referred to as “The Binary,” since the ability allows Carol to wield the energies of a binary star as a blast of yellow energy. Canonically, there are few beings who can surpass Capt. Marvel’s Binary Form.

4 Her Military Background

Despite suffering from amnesia and being conditioned by the Kree, Capt. Marvel retains her combat prowess and even improves her skills with the addition of her newfound superpowers.

This is because Carol’s airforce training on Earth is heavily engrained in both her body and mind. While glimpses of her army days and some flight training are shown in the movie, her military background is a lot more grueling and extensive in the comics. This is also why she exudes leadership and commands respect wherever she goes – she’s military authority incarnate.

3 Capt. Marvel’s Network

By being born on Earth and being trained by the Kree, it’s established in the comics that Capt. Marvel networked around the universe. This may explain her expansive knowledge of the cosmos despite being a (temporarily) brainwashed Kree soldier with limited memories.

In her cinematic appearances, Capt. Marvel is familiar with the universe’s many planets and races, even guiding the Skrulls to their new homeworld. It’s implied that she knows exactly how to help different worlds affected by Thanos’ snap, though it’s never shown. Perhaps her many galactic connections proved useful during these off-world missions.

RELATED: Marvel: 5 Things We Hope The Endgame Re-Release Reveals (& 5 Things We Hope It Doesn’t)

2 Her Seventh Sense

Capt. Marvel always seemed to appear at the right moment, coming in the nick of time to save the day. This was best seen in her Avengers appearances when she lucked into Tony Stark and arrived at the last minute to turn the tides of war against Thanos.

If Carol retained her Seventh Sense from the comics, her conveniently great timing would make a lot more sense. Simply put, this instinct allows her to feel major changes anywhere in the universe. This could also be why she left Earth post-Infinity War, sensing trouble on a cosmic scale.

1 The Real Carol Danvers

Despite being different sides of the same person, the stoic Kree fighter Vers and the rebellious human pilot Carol have overlapping traits that made it hard for some to differentiate the two.

Carol had a similar dual identity in her earlier comics, but it’s better laid out. Previously, Ms. Marvel was an entirely new persona that Carol could switch to – not unlike Billy Batson and Shazam. The trade-off was that Carol lost her emotions whenever she became the hot-blooded Kree warrior. If not for Prof. Xavier’s help, Carol would never have been able to feel anything as Ms. Marvel.

NEXT: 10 Best Avengers Quotes


2019-07-13 07:07:11

Angelo Delos Trinos

Captain Marvel: 10 Things In The Movie That Only Make Sense If You Read The Comics

The first Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) to debut in 2019 was Captain Marvel, the origin movie for the titular superhero and (technically) a prequel to The Avengers. The movie tells how the defiant airforce pilot Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) became Capt. Marvel – the strongest Avenger and possibly one of the most powerful beings in the whole universe.

But in her move from the pages of a comic book to the big screen, Capt. Marvel changed a lot and left a lot of interesting and important details in translation. While these changes aren’t detrimental to her presence in the MCU, their absences make certain events and abilities a bit hard to understand. Here are 10 things in Captain Marvel that only make sense if you read the comics.

RELATED: 10 Strongest Female Marvel Characters

10 The Kree-Skrull War

From the day that she started fighting for the Kree, Capt. Marvel was told that their duty was to exterminate the shapeshifting Skrulls. The Krees’ irrational hatred of the Skrulls is briefly mentioned in the movie – where it’s revealed that the Skrulls are war refugees being oppressed by the Kree – but the comics provide a different in-depth explanation.

The races have been at war for generations and their conflict hit a boiling point when the Kree attacked a Skrull solar system. Desperate, the Skrulls called the Avengers for help while the half-Kree Capt. Marvel begrudgingly sided with the Kree.

9 Goose’s Digestive Tract

Capt. Marvel’s cat Goose isn’t just an ordinary pet because it’s actually a Flerken: an alien that hides giant tentacles, fangs and hundreds of its eggs within its body. It also just so happens to look like a regular Earth cat.

Flerkens’ stomachs are also known to be pocket realities that can hold and digest pretty much anything, including objects and beings larger than it. This is how Goose can store her tentacles in her small frame and swallow the Tesseract before puking it out without suffering any major damage despite eating an Infinity Stone.

8 The Source Of Her Powers

In the movie, Carol Danvers becomes Capt. Marvel after an experimental engine powered by the Tesseract’s energies explodes in her face. Miraculously, she isn’t harmed and instead receives incredible superpowers.

Similarly, Capt. Marvel gets her powers from a Kree device in the comics but this time it’s from the Psyche-Magnitron – something designed to bestow superpowers to a designated target or user from the start. As a result, Capt. Marvel gained super strength, flight, enhanced senses, photonic blasts, and more following the life-threatening incident.

7 Her Inhibited Strength

Capt. Marvel is one of the most powerful superheroes in both the comics and the MCU. Her raw power surpasses even the cosmic scales, which is why a measly Kree inhibitor keeping her in check didn’t make much sense.

The only way this could be justified is if Capt. Marvel was brainwashed, which happened a lot in the early comics. To subdue her, villains like the Brood, MODOK, and Supreme Intelligence convinced Carol that she wasn’t that powerful. The Kree in the movie had it easy since Carol lost her memories in the blast, making her conditioning less troublesome.

6 Her Nigh-Invulnerability

Over the course of her movie. Capt. Marvel takes a lot of punishment from either Kree soldiers or ships and barely receives a scratch. This isn’t the result of luck, but her passive superhuman abilities in action.

Not only can she absorb energy and force before firing it back at its source, but she also has a quick-acting healing factor that allows her to recuperate in the heat of battle. This could help explain how she effortlessly wiped out a Kree war fleet while tanking Thanos’ Hulk-stopping punches and a Power Stone blast later in Endgame.

RELATED: Every Single Avengers Movie (In Chronological Order)

5 Her Photon Blasts

It’s unclear what exactly the Tesseract’s energies did to Capt. Marvel and how they gave her an assortment of powers, one of which is the ability to fire concentrated photon shots from her hands.

A possible explanation lies in the comics, specifically when the Brood experimented on her and gave her the ability to manipulate the stars’ energies into photon blasts. This is referred to as “The Binary,” since the ability allows Carol to wield the energies of a binary star as a blast of yellow energy. Canonically, there are few beings who can surpass Capt. Marvel’s Binary Form.

4 Her Military Background

Despite suffering from amnesia and being conditioned by the Kree, Capt. Marvel retains her combat prowess and even improves her skills with the addition of her newfound superpowers.

This is because Carol’s airforce training on Earth is heavily engrained in both her body and mind. While glimpses of her army days and some flight training are shown in the movie, her military background is a lot more grueling and extensive in the comics. This is also why she exudes leadership and commands respect wherever she goes – she’s military authority incarnate.

3 Capt. Marvel’s Network

By being born on Earth and being trained by the Kree, it’s established in the comics that Capt. Marvel networked around the universe. This may explain her expansive knowledge of the cosmos despite being a (temporarily) brainwashed Kree soldier with limited memories.

In her cinematic appearances, Capt. Marvel is familiar with the universe’s many planets and races, even guiding the Skrulls to their new homeworld. It’s implied that she knows exactly how to help different worlds affected by Thanos’ snap, though it’s never shown. Perhaps her many galactic connections proved useful during these off-world missions.

RELATED: Marvel: 5 Things We Hope The Endgame Re-Release Reveals (& 5 Things We Hope It Doesn’t)

2 Her Seventh Sense

Capt. Marvel always seemed to appear at the right moment, coming in the nick of time to save the day. This was best seen in her Avengers appearances when she lucked into Tony Stark and arrived at the last minute to turn the tides of war against Thanos.

If Carol retained her Seventh Sense from the comics, her conveniently great timing would make a lot more sense. Simply put, this instinct allows her to feel major changes anywhere in the universe. This could also be why she left Earth post-Infinity War, sensing trouble on a cosmic scale.

1 The Real Carol Danvers

Despite being different sides of the same person, the stoic Kree fighter Vers and the rebellious human pilot Carol have overlapping traits that made it hard for some to differentiate the two.

Carol had a similar dual identity in her earlier comics, but it’s better laid out. Previously, Ms. Marvel was an entirely new persona that Carol could switch to – not unlike Billy Batson and Shazam. The trade-off was that Carol lost her emotions whenever she became the hot-blooded Kree warrior. If not for Prof. Xavier’s help, Carol would never have been able to feel anything as Ms. Marvel.

NEXT: 10 Best Avengers Quotes


2019-07-13 07:07:11

Angelo Delos Trinos

How Captain America Is Able To [SPOILER] In Avengers: Endgame

WARNING: Major spoilers for Avengers: Endgame.

Captain America lifted Mjolnir in Avengers: Endgame – but just how does it work? The third act of Avengers: Endgame was easily the most gripping action sequence in the entire MCU to date, as the Avengers Trinity faced off against Thanos at last. Steve Rogers has always been an unusual figure among these three heroes; Tony Stark is a genius who by now is wearing what’s surely his most powerful armor yet, while Thor is a literal god. Captain America may be a super-soldier, but his powers pale in comparison to his allies’ abilities.

And yet, to Thanos’ surprise, Captain America proves able to hold his own. He does this by picking up Mjolnir, proving himself worthy. What follows is a stunning fight, as Steve Rogers blends his own tactical acumen with the power of the God of Thunder. From that point on, Captain America becomes one of the Avengers’ heavy hitters, much to Thor’s delight.

Related: Avengers: Endgame’s Ending & Marvel Movie Future Explained In Detail

It’s important to remember that Mjolnir was blessed with a double-enchantment by Odin. The first is that only someone who is truly “worthy” has the ability to wield Mjolnir. The second, as Steve Rogers proved in Avengers: Endgame, is that anyone who picks up the hammer possesses the power of Thor. So why was Captain America worthy?

Why Captain America Is Worthy To Wield Mjolnir In Avengers: Endgame

The theme of “worthiness” lies at the heart of the Thor trilogy. In 2011’s Thor, the God of Thunder proved he was unworthy to take the throne of Asgard when he committed an act of war that would potentially lead to the deaths of millions. His concern was for his own glory, for the thrill of battle, and not for the good of the Nine Realms. That was when Odin stripped Thor of his powers, and placed the worthiness enchantment upon Mjolnir. By the end of the film, Thor had proved himself worthy when he was willing to sacrifice himself for the sake of those he loved. This principle was extended in Thor: The Dark World, when the God of Thunder was again willing to stand as a champion – this time not just for those he loved, but for the entire Nine Realms. The Realms saw Thor battle against Malekith, and acknowledged him as a worthy king.

In the MCU, then, the worthiness enchantment is tied to a person’s willingness to stand up for others – no matter the cost. This is pretty much the same principle as the comics, where Mjolnir has been lifted by a number of other key figures in the past, most notably Jane Foster. Jane was dying of cancer, and every time she transformed into the female Thor it reversed the effect of her chemotherapy; and yet she continued to act as a hero, irrespective of the cost. She was willing to sacrifice everything for the good of others, even for the Asgardians who distrusted and reviled her, and as a result she was worthy.

Avengers: Endgame confirms that Steve Rogers, too, is worthy. This shouldn’t really be much of a surprise; Captain America’s entire life has been a demonstration of self-sacrificial heroism, even before he became a super-soldier. Rogers was unwilling to sit the Second World War out, not because he sought glory and recognition, but because he yearned to make a difference. At the end of Captain America: The First Avenger, Steve Rogers was even willing to give his own life to protect New York City from Hydra’s bombs. Instead of dying, he awoke from cryogenic suspension 70 years later, and ever since he’s been on the front lines, battling to keep others safe. In Avengers: Endgame, the stakes are higher than ever before, and Captain America is risking his own life to literally bring back half the lives in the universe – whatever it takes.

Related: Ragnarok Revealed The Real Reason Odin Stripped Thor Of His Power

Did Captain America Already Lift Mjolnir In Avengers: Age Of Ultron?

Curiously enough, this is the second time in the MCU that Captain America has attempted to lift Mjolnir. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, there’s an entertaining scene in which the Avengers attempt to pick up Thor’s hammer. The God of Thunder watches, prideful and amused, right up until the moment Steve Rogers makes an attempt. To Thor’s shock, Mjolnir actually moves just a fraction.

Taken at face value, the scene appears to suggest that – at least in Avengers: Age of Ultron – Steve Rogers was almost worthy, but not quite. Avengers: Endgame suggests another explanation, though; that back in 2015, Captain America felt Mjolnir shift in his hands, and chose not to pick it up. Perhaps he saw the look on Thor’s face, and realized his friend would be devastated that a mortal was able to lift Mjolnir. That makes sense; Captain America is a lot less prideful than the rest of the Avengers, and he doesn’t really feel the same need to prove himself to others. But in Avengers: Endgame, with Thor being defeated by Thanos, Steve knows he has no choice. He picks up Mjolnir, claiming the power of Thor for himself, and using it against the Mad Titan. By this time Thor’s lost a lot of his pride, and as a result he’s thrilled to see that Steve Rogers is worthy.

Captain America Has Lifted Mjolnir In The Comics

There have been several occasions when Captain America lifted Mjolnir in the comics. The most famous was in The Mighty Thor #390, at a time when Rogers had abandoned the Captain America identity and just called himself “The Captain.” Thor paid a visit to Avengers Mansion, and was somewhat shocked at a very different Avengers team. His visit coincided with an attack by Seth, the Egyptian God of Death, and soon he was battling alongside the Avengers against Seth’s armies. In one scene, Thor was knocked down and Mjolnir was flung from his grasp; to everybody’s surprise, the Captain picked it up and wielded it before tossing it straight back to the God of Thunder. It happened again in 2011’s Fear Itself event, when Thor was killed by his malevolent uncle, the Serpent. Steve Rogers – who had only recently returned from the dead and reclaimed the Captain America mantle – grabbed Mjolnir and summoned the lightning as he uttered that famous battlecry: “Avengers assemble!”

Leaving aside one strange, controversial example from “Secret Empire” – it involved a warped version of reality – there have only been these two occasions where Captain America has used Mjolnir in the comics. It happens in the worst of situations, when all seems lost, and it’s as spectacular a demonstration of Steve’s character as it is of the power of Thor. That now seems to be true in the MCU as well.

More: Avengers: Endgame’s Post-Credits Surprise Explained


2019-04-25 06:04:22

Thomas Bacon

The Evolution Of Captain America In The MCU

Captain America’s journey in the MCU has been a long one, and he’s been through a lot. He started out his story in these films as a young, sickly kid in 1940s Brooklyn who wanted so badly to help fight in World War II. From there he has been a hero, a fugitive, and more. While we don’t yet know Captain America’s fate in Avengers: Endgame and what, if any, story lies ahead for Steve Rogers, we can look back on his evolution thus far.

Here are the main stages of Captain America’s evolution in the MCU.

RELATED: Captain America ‘Fights Like Thor’ in The BEST Way

10 SKINNY KID FROM BROOKLYN WHO HATED BULLIES

When we first meet Steve Rogers, he’s a young adult in ’40s Brooklyn who likes to fight bullies in alleyways. He desperately wants to join the Army and fight for what he thinks is right, especially considering his best friend is going and his dad died in World War I. Even before he was Captain America, Steve cared deeply about doing the right thing and sticking up for people. He didn’t like bullies, and as Dr. Erskine said, he was a good man.

9 BECOMING CAPTAIN AMERICA

The next major moment in Cap’s evolution is him becoming Captain America. Because of his inherent goodness (and a particularly clever moment with a flagpole), he is picked to try the super soldier serum. He becomes Captain America but is mostly used to sell war bonds at first.

RELATED: Captain America: Civil War Happened Too Early In The MCU – But Marvel Had No Choice

However, when he makes a tour stop in Italy, he learns that Bucky is either missing or killed in action. This prompts him to use the powers he has been given to save Bucky and the other soldiers. This is the moment where Steve really starts to become Captain America and learn how to be not just a hero, but a superhero.

8 WAKING UP FROM THE ICE AS A MAN OUT OF TIME

At the end of Captain America: The First Avenger, Steve sacrifices himself to save millions of others when he flies the plane into the ice. He wakes up again around 70 years later to a completely new world. He’s now a man in the 21st century, and he’s left to try and figure out how to live in this new world. Everyone he was close to is either dead or old, like Peggy who lived a full life while she thought Steve was dead. Steve is definitely lost and unsure of his place in the world and where he can find friends and family now.

7 BECOMING PART OF THE AVENGERS

In The Avengers, we see Steve still trying to figure out the new time period he lives in. He is recruited by Fury to become part of the Avengers Initiative. Of course, this doesn’t go super smoothly at first, and it takes some time for the Avengers to fight together as a team.

RELATED: Avengers Cast Sings Marvel-Themed We Didn’t Start the Fire

But, this is the start of a new lease on life for Cap as he’s able to fight bullies and help save the world again. He also begins to find people he can call a team, although he still struggles to feel he belongs going into Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

6 DISILLUSIONMENT IN WINTER SOLDIER

In Winter Soldier, Steve is working for SHIELD, but he still is clearly mourning the loss of his old life and the people he cared about. He starts to find people he can rely on such as Sam Wilson, but he also learns the awful truth the SHIELD has been infiltrated by HYDRA. This knowledge clearly shakes him deeply and shakes a lot of the trust he had in institutions. This shift in his way of thinking will come into play many times in later movies, too.

5 SAVING BUCKY BARNES

The other most important part of Steve’s evolution in The Winter Soldier is learning that Bucky Barnes is still alive and has been brainwashed into being a HYDRA assassin.

RELATED: Avengers 4’s Chris Evans Says Bucky is Steve Rogers’ “Home”

Steve is stuck between wanting to do everything he can to save the world and wanting to save his friend. He is willing to die instead of fighting Bucky, and Bucky’s emergence back into his life will impact his arc in the rest of the movies.

4 A TROUBLED RELATIONSHIP AS CO-LEADERS WITH TONY STARK

From the moment they meet in The Avengers, Tony and Steve have a somewhat hostile relationship. They are two very different people, although they both believe strongly in doing what they can to save others. At times they respect each other, and many other times they are at odds. Their relationship is strained once again in Avengers: Age of Ultron which leads into the major conflict in Captain America: Civil War.

3 BREAKING THE LAW TO DO WHAT HE BELIEVES IS RIGHT

In Civil War, Steve Rogers has another major shift. While many believe Steve is a letter-of-the-law type of man, he is more loyal to people and ideas than institutions. When the Accords are presented, he chooses to go against them, and his decision is cemented when Bucky is blamed for the attack on the U.N.

RELATED: The 5 Movies You Have To Watch To Understand Avengers: Endgame

Steve is stuck between wanting to do everything he can to save the world and wanting to save his friend. He is willing to die instead of fighting Bucky, and Bucky’s emergence back into his life will impact his arc in the rest of the movies.

2 FUGITIVE/NOMAD

After Civil War, Captain America is a fugitive and war criminal. He is off the grid and takes haven in Wakanda before going on covert missions with Falcon and Black Widow. He is clearly disillusioned and not sure how to embody the Captain America role anymore. He distances himself from this title during this time period. As he no longer has his shield, he takes up the Nomad identity from the comics, even though this time period of his life isn’t focused on much onscreen.

1 TAKING UP THE MANTLE OF LEADER AGAIN

In Avengers: Infinity War, Steve is still a fugitive. However, when Thanos becomes a threat and Tony Stark is no longer there to defend earth, Steve becomes a leader again. He doesn’t exactly take up the Captain America mantle again, but he does bring the rest of the team on earth together to fight the battle in Wakanda. When the Thanos snap happens and the Avengers lose, Steve is clearly devastated. While Endgame isn’t out quite yet, we’ve seen from trailers that he will get the shield back somehow and will likely embrace his Captain America title more fully once again.

NEXT: Avengers: Endgame Early Reactions: A Truly Epic Conclusion (& Beginning)


2019-04-24 03:04:44

Amanda Steele

Captain Marvel Fan Sees Movie So Many Times He Broke a World Record

A very dedicated superhero movie fan from Wisconsin has seen Captain Marvel so many times he broke a Guinness World Record. The first Marvel movie built around a female lead character, Captain Marvel has been embraced by movie fans everywhere, grossing $1.08 billion worldwide. The film just recently reached another box office milestone in North America, cracking the $400 million mark.

Starring Brie Larson, Captain Marvel debuted the cinematic version of Carol Danvers, a comic book character first introduced in 1968. Like her comic book incarnation, the movie Danvers is an Air Force pilot who acquires superpowers and fights alongside an alien race called the Kree. In the movie, Danvers returns to Earth in the 1990s and discovers her human origins while also forging a friendship with a pre-eyepatch Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Having set up Captain Marvel as part of the MCU, Marvel will now plunge the character into the middle of the final battle against Thanos in the soon-to-be-blockbuster Avengers: Endgame.

Related: Did Captain Marvel Reveal How Thanos Got The Mind Stone?

Captain Marvel has undoubtedly been a major success for Marvel, and there’s one fan in particular who has contributed to that success more than anyone else. As reported by CBS 58 (via CBR), Wisconsin man Steve Ruppel has now seen the movie in the theater an astonishing 116 times, a feat that gives him the Guinness World Record. Ruppel explained why he chose Captain Marvel in particular for his run at the record:

“I love superhero movies, and so this was a pretty good fit. I knew it was going to be around for a while, and I thought it would probably be a good choice for this particular record. Looking back on it now, I might almost consider a Disney movie, because they’re usually shorter and probably around for a while, but that singing would drive me crazy. It really would.”

The non-musical Captain Marvel runs for 123 minutes, so (barring in-movie naps) Ruppel has spent 14,268 minutes watching the film, which equals 237.8 hours or 9.9 days. Not surprisingly, Ruppel said he had to take time off from work in order to hit the multiplex enough times to break the record. Ruppel said that he initially thought it was impossible to break the record, adding, “I wasn’t even sure why it was even a record, but I thought after a while ‘I should probably do that.'” Ruppel said the most times he saw the movie in one day was seven, and explained that he would defeat boredom by paying attention to background details.

Ruppel is of course not the only person to perform remarkable feats of Marvel movie watching. Back in 2018, an Avengers: Infinity War fan chronicled his 42 theatrical viewings of the MCU epic via social media. This week, a number of big Marvel fans will participate in an MCU re-watch marathon, which will end with Avengers: Endgame.

Given the huge popularity of Captain Marvel and the rest of the Marvel movies, it’s no surprise to see fans getting incredibly enthusiastic and even going wild with the hype. A few fans like Ruppel are even willing to take their fandom to the next level by testing their sanity and bladder capacity in order to perform grueling feats of film viewing. Some may question the wisdom of such undertakings, but there’s no questioning the dedication of fans who would willingly go so far above and beyond the call of duty to become superheroes of going to movies.

More: Every Marvel Cinematic Universe Movie, Ranked Worst To Best

Source: CBS 58 (via CBR)


2019-04-22 08:04:13

Dan Zinski

Tony Stark Misses Captain America’s Optimism in New Endgame Spot

Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) misses Captain America’s (Steve Rogers) “giddy optimism” in a newly-released Avengers: Endgame TV Spot. It’s been a tumultuous last couple of years for the MCU heroes following their falling out in Captain America: Civil War. But after suffering a devastating loss to Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War, the two seems to be ready to set aside their differences for the common good in the much-anticipated Joe and Anthony Russo-directed film. Written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, the project will wrap up the 22-film arc that the franchise has been treading since 2008’s Iron Man collectively known as The Infinity Saga.

Plot details are still tightly under wraps with Disney’s marketing designed to not give anything away in terms of Endgame‘s narrative. Infinity War was one of the most secretive productions ever, and with its sequel supposedly having more spoilers, it makes sense that Marvel Studios is doubling down on security. Trailers have barely revealed anything about how things pan out for both the remaining heroes and Thanos. But the TV spots, which have been rolling out regularly for the past several days offering fans an idea on what to expect in the Phase 3 capper. The latest promo clip previews what kind of dynamic the two MCU founding heroes will have in the film.

Related: Tony Stark Doesn’t Want to Die in Avengers: Endgame TV Spot

Shared by Marvel Studios‘ official Twitter account is a new Endgame TV spot composed of old and new footage. The clip starts with an emotional narration from Black Widow explaining how she never had the family, but because of the Avengers, she somehow found people she can totally trust. The video continues with a flurry of scenes and ends with a new dialog from Tony, seemingly telling Steve that he misses Steve Rogers’ “giddy optimism.” Watch the clip below:

Fans have seen the particular exchange between Iron Man and Captan America in a couple of previously released clips, but Marvel Studios continues to change the lines in the scene. In an earlier video, Stark was asking Steve about getting the whole team together, while in another, he says it would be nice to not die trying to execute their plan to take down Thanos. With the Russos admitting footage manipulation for the sake of Endgame‘s marketing, it won’t be surprising if nothing in these spots are in the film – at least in the scene in question. Nonetheless, it’s a great promotional material considering people’s investment in these two characters – both in their separate and collective arcs. Infinity War kept them separate all throughout with just minor references to one another, and seeing them reunite for the Phase 3 capper will definitely be one of the most powerful scenes in the project. And if they retain the same vibe that these exchanges have, it’s safe to say that the heroes will be able to recover from their previous conflict and not have a problem operating as a unit.

Stark and Rogers are two heroes expected to exit the MCU via Avengers: Endgame. While most are convinced that they’ll both die fighting the good fight, there are several other ways to sideline them without the need to permanently write them out of the franchise. If anything, no one’s really gone in the world of comic books and if Marvel Studios wants to emulate that, they would also have to somehow follow the same format. Chances are that although fans won’t be seeing them as prominently as they are in the franchise in the coming years, they can easily be called back for another event film to evoke nostalgia from their long-time supporters.

More: Thanos Wants to Destroy Earth (Not Balance It) in Endgame TV Ad

Source: Marvel Studios



2019-04-22 05:04:58

Ana Dumaraog