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Lucifer: 8 Things They Changed From The Comics (And 2 Things They Kept The Same)

Against all odds, Fox TV’s adaptation of Lucifer survived cancellation thanks to its dedicated fanbase. Loosely based on the comics of the same name that spawned out of Neil Gaiman’s magnum opus Sandman, the show follows a retired Lucifer Morningstar (Tom Ellis) as he runs a fancy nightclub on Earth where he meets all kinds of people and otherworldly beings.

Just like Arrow or Gotham, this adaptation of a well-known DC title only borrows the basics of its source material before telling its own story. It goes without saying that a lot was changed during the comics’ translation to the small screen, many of which fans of the Vertigo comics written by Mike Carey would quickly notice. Here are two things that Lucifer kept the same from the comics, as well as eight things that were changed.

RELATED: Rob Zombie’s 3 From Hell Full Trailer: The Firefly Family Returns

10 Same: Abandoning Hell

Both the comics and the series start with Lucifer growing disillusioned about dominion over Hell, which convinces him to leave his duties and retire in the mortal realm of Earth. As novel as this premise may sound, this forms the backbone of the entire story and grounds one of the most well-known Biblical figures.

The only notable difference here is that Lucifer comes to this decision by himself in the series, whereas he took Dream’s words to heart in Sandman before leaving hell for his own Vertigo series.

9 Same: The Lux

Equally as famous as Lucifer himself is his club: The Latex Lux. Located in uptown Los Angeles, the upscale club serves as Lucifer’s home on Earth and base of operations, where he goes to recuperate or wile the nights away playing the piano.

A slight difference here is that Lucifer doesn’t spend much time in the Lux in the comics because he’s usually on an off-world adventure. On the other hand, the series pays lots of attention to the Lux and its day-to-day operations because of the series’ more grounded and less heightened approach to Lucifer’s story.

8 Different: The DC Connection

Because of the fact that Lucifer was published by Vertigo Comics, which is DC Comics’ imprint for mature stories, encounters with DC characters were bound to happen. Some of his notable crossovers include meeting John Constantine in The New 52 reboot and his famously eye-opening conversations with Dream in Sandman.

Since Fox TV doesn’t have the rights to many of DC’s characters, Lucifer’s world has been considerably shrunken for his televised run. For legal reasons, the show makes no mentions of the many superheroes and other residents of the DC universe that Lucifer met in the past.

RELATED: Netflix Officially Orders Sandman TV Series From Neil Gaiman 

7 Different: The Story’s Structure

In his comics, Lucifer embarked on a sprawling cosmic quest to save all of Creation. This led to various adventures where he interacted with different beings from a multitude of worlds and dimensions. Lucifer carried on the high fantasies of Sandman but gave them a dark spin. Appropriate, given who he is.

The televised adaptation turns Lucifer’s story in a procedural crime series with an urban fantasy twist, kind of like Supernatural. This may have been done for budgetary reasons and possibly to give audiences a more familiar set-up for a show starring The Devil himself.

6 Different: The Catalyst

Both versions of Lucifer start with him being spurned out of retirement, but what pushes him differs. The series has Lucifer feeling sympathy for the first time in ages after a human friend is murdered outside his club, leading him to work with the steadfast LAPD detective Chloe to solve the crime and learn about her world.

Meanwhile, in the comics, Lucifer receives a mission from God. Should he accept it, the fallen angel could name any price he wants. Though suspicious of the diety’s real motives, Lucifer takes it up to kill time and seize the ultimate opportunity.

RELATED: Lucifer: The 10 Most Vile Villains On The Show, Ranked

5 Different: The State Of Hell

After spending eons on his throne, Lucifer grows weary of overseeing Hell and leaves it for Earth. This turns out to be a big mistake, since Hell quickly fell apart without his leadership, forcing even God himself to beg the former Lord of the Damned to return.

Conversely, Hell was fine after Lucifer’s departure in the comics. This was because, unlike the series, God had a contingency plan prepared in case of Lucifer’s retirement. In Lucifer’s place, a pair of angels who were originally sent to deliver a message were fooled by God into running Hell.

4 Different: Amenadiel

In both the comics and the series, Lucifer has to deal with heaven’s wrath that’s best represented by the angel Amenadiel. Driven by his loyalty to God and his hatred for Lucifer, Amenadiel attacks Lucifer whenever he can but his character arc is different in both incarnations.

Where he’s a single-minded nuisance in the comics, Amenadiel is a more fleshed-out character in the series. Amenadiel questions God’s authority and even allies himself with Lucifer in the series, while he dies a dumb brute in the comics after being constantly outsmarted by the former angel.

3 Difference: Mazikeen/Maze

Lucifer may be a loner, but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have any friends. His most well-known ally is Makizeen, who also enjoys the distinction of being the only person Lucifer openly shows affection to. At least that’s how it is in the comics.

While her mangled face remains, Makizeen’s relationship with Lucifer is different in the show. Here, she’s painted as his best friend since Lucifer’s love interest is Chloe. She’s also not as loyal as she was, constantly planning coups against Lucifer—something her illustrated counterpart would never do. That and she can now talk properly.

2 Different: Lucifer’s Personality

While his name and backstory remain the same, Lucifer is a different person in the comics and series. Originally, Lucifer was an arrogant sociopath who meddled into human affairs out of morbid curiosity. He does value his few allies, but generally speaking, he couldn’t be bothered to care much for anyone other than himself.

The series presents a more human and emotional Lucifer who hides his true emotions behind a smugly sarcastic facade. This has made him more vulnerable but also more relatable to his father’s creations that he’s used to punishing in the afterlife.

1 Different: The Central Theme

What made the comics unique and well-revered was its philosophically-charged analysis of free will and destiny. Since his creation, Lucifer wanted to be truly free of his father’s control, but even his rebellion may have been divinely predestined, further embittering the already furious fallen angel.

The series has shades of this, but they’re considerably toned down, instead opting to concentrate on Lucifer’s connection with those around him and his discovery of what love and mortality mean. While an interesting arc for a demon to have, the series’ point is noticeably simpler than the source material’s.

NEXT: What Lucifer In Hell Means For Season 5


2019-07-16 01:07:08

Angelo Delos Trinos

Captain Marvel: 10 Things In The Movie That Only Make Sense If You Read The Comics

The first Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) to debut in 2019 was Captain Marvel, the origin movie for the titular superhero and (technically) a prequel to The Avengers. The movie tells how the defiant airforce pilot Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) became Capt. Marvel – the strongest Avenger and possibly one of the most powerful beings in the whole universe.

But in her move from the pages of a comic book to the big screen, Capt. Marvel changed a lot and left a lot of interesting and important details in translation. While these changes aren’t detrimental to her presence in the MCU, their absences make certain events and abilities a bit hard to understand. Here are 10 things in Captain Marvel that only make sense if you read the comics.

RELATED: 10 Strongest Female Marvel Characters

10 The Kree-Skrull War

From the day that she started fighting for the Kree, Capt. Marvel was told that their duty was to exterminate the shapeshifting Skrulls. The Krees’ irrational hatred of the Skrulls is briefly mentioned in the movie – where it’s revealed that the Skrulls are war refugees being oppressed by the Kree – but the comics provide a different in-depth explanation.

The races have been at war for generations and their conflict hit a boiling point when the Kree attacked a Skrull solar system. Desperate, the Skrulls called the Avengers for help while the half-Kree Capt. Marvel begrudgingly sided with the Kree.

9 Goose’s Digestive Tract

Capt. Marvel’s cat Goose isn’t just an ordinary pet because it’s actually a Flerken: an alien that hides giant tentacles, fangs and hundreds of its eggs within its body. It also just so happens to look like a regular Earth cat.

Flerkens’ stomachs are also known to be pocket realities that can hold and digest pretty much anything, including objects and beings larger than it. This is how Goose can store her tentacles in her small frame and swallow the Tesseract before puking it out without suffering any major damage despite eating an Infinity Stone.

8 The Source Of Her Powers

In the movie, Carol Danvers becomes Capt. Marvel after an experimental engine powered by the Tesseract’s energies explodes in her face. Miraculously, she isn’t harmed and instead receives incredible superpowers.

Similarly, Capt. Marvel gets her powers from a Kree device in the comics but this time it’s from the Psyche-Magnitron – something designed to bestow superpowers to a designated target or user from the start. As a result, Capt. Marvel gained super strength, flight, enhanced senses, photonic blasts, and more following the life-threatening incident.

7 Her Inhibited Strength

Capt. Marvel is one of the most powerful superheroes in both the comics and the MCU. Her raw power surpasses even the cosmic scales, which is why a measly Kree inhibitor keeping her in check didn’t make much sense.

The only way this could be justified is if Capt. Marvel was brainwashed, which happened a lot in the early comics. To subdue her, villains like the Brood, MODOK, and Supreme Intelligence convinced Carol that she wasn’t that powerful. The Kree in the movie had it easy since Carol lost her memories in the blast, making her conditioning less troublesome.

6 Her Nigh-Invulnerability

Over the course of her movie. Capt. Marvel takes a lot of punishment from either Kree soldiers or ships and barely receives a scratch. This isn’t the result of luck, but her passive superhuman abilities in action.

Not only can she absorb energy and force before firing it back at its source, but she also has a quick-acting healing factor that allows her to recuperate in the heat of battle. This could help explain how she effortlessly wiped out a Kree war fleet while tanking Thanos’ Hulk-stopping punches and a Power Stone blast later in Endgame.

RELATED: Every Single Avengers Movie (In Chronological Order)

5 Her Photon Blasts

It’s unclear what exactly the Tesseract’s energies did to Capt. Marvel and how they gave her an assortment of powers, one of which is the ability to fire concentrated photon shots from her hands.

A possible explanation lies in the comics, specifically when the Brood experimented on her and gave her the ability to manipulate the stars’ energies into photon blasts. This is referred to as “The Binary,” since the ability allows Carol to wield the energies of a binary star as a blast of yellow energy. Canonically, there are few beings who can surpass Capt. Marvel’s Binary Form.

4 Her Military Background

Despite suffering from amnesia and being conditioned by the Kree, Capt. Marvel retains her combat prowess and even improves her skills with the addition of her newfound superpowers.

This is because Carol’s airforce training on Earth is heavily engrained in both her body and mind. While glimpses of her army days and some flight training are shown in the movie, her military background is a lot more grueling and extensive in the comics. This is also why she exudes leadership and commands respect wherever she goes – she’s military authority incarnate.

3 Capt. Marvel’s Network

By being born on Earth and being trained by the Kree, it’s established in the comics that Capt. Marvel networked around the universe. This may explain her expansive knowledge of the cosmos despite being a (temporarily) brainwashed Kree soldier with limited memories.

In her cinematic appearances, Capt. Marvel is familiar with the universe’s many planets and races, even guiding the Skrulls to their new homeworld. It’s implied that she knows exactly how to help different worlds affected by Thanos’ snap, though it’s never shown. Perhaps her many galactic connections proved useful during these off-world missions.

RELATED: Marvel: 5 Things We Hope The Endgame Re-Release Reveals (& 5 Things We Hope It Doesn’t)

2 Her Seventh Sense

Capt. Marvel always seemed to appear at the right moment, coming in the nick of time to save the day. This was best seen in her Avengers appearances when she lucked into Tony Stark and arrived at the last minute to turn the tides of war against Thanos.

If Carol retained her Seventh Sense from the comics, her conveniently great timing would make a lot more sense. Simply put, this instinct allows her to feel major changes anywhere in the universe. This could also be why she left Earth post-Infinity War, sensing trouble on a cosmic scale.

1 The Real Carol Danvers

Despite being different sides of the same person, the stoic Kree fighter Vers and the rebellious human pilot Carol have overlapping traits that made it hard for some to differentiate the two.

Carol had a similar dual identity in her earlier comics, but it’s better laid out. Previously, Ms. Marvel was an entirely new persona that Carol could switch to – not unlike Billy Batson and Shazam. The trade-off was that Carol lost her emotions whenever she became the hot-blooded Kree warrior. If not for Prof. Xavier’s help, Carol would never have been able to feel anything as Ms. Marvel.

NEXT: 10 Best Avengers Quotes


2019-07-13 07:07:11

Angelo Delos Trinos

Captain Marvel: 10 Things In The Movie That Only Make Sense If You Read The Comics

The first Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) to debut in 2019 was Captain Marvel, the origin movie for the titular superhero and (technically) a prequel to The Avengers. The movie tells how the defiant airforce pilot Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) became Capt. Marvel – the strongest Avenger and possibly one of the most powerful beings in the whole universe.

But in her move from the pages of a comic book to the big screen, Capt. Marvel changed a lot and left a lot of interesting and important details in translation. While these changes aren’t detrimental to her presence in the MCU, their absences make certain events and abilities a bit hard to understand. Here are 10 things in Captain Marvel that only make sense if you read the comics.

RELATED: 10 Strongest Female Marvel Characters

10 The Kree-Skrull War

From the day that she started fighting for the Kree, Capt. Marvel was told that their duty was to exterminate the shapeshifting Skrulls. The Krees’ irrational hatred of the Skrulls is briefly mentioned in the movie – where it’s revealed that the Skrulls are war refugees being oppressed by the Kree – but the comics provide a different in-depth explanation.

The races have been at war for generations and their conflict hit a boiling point when the Kree attacked a Skrull solar system. Desperate, the Skrulls called the Avengers for help while the half-Kree Capt. Marvel begrudgingly sided with the Kree.

9 Goose’s Digestive Tract

Capt. Marvel’s cat Goose isn’t just an ordinary pet because it’s actually a Flerken: an alien that hides giant tentacles, fangs and hundreds of its eggs within its body. It also just so happens to look like a regular Earth cat.

Flerkens’ stomachs are also known to be pocket realities that can hold and digest pretty much anything, including objects and beings larger than it. This is how Goose can store her tentacles in her small frame and swallow the Tesseract before puking it out without suffering any major damage despite eating an Infinity Stone.

8 The Source Of Her Powers

In the movie, Carol Danvers becomes Capt. Marvel after an experimental engine powered by the Tesseract’s energies explodes in her face. Miraculously, she isn’t harmed and instead receives incredible superpowers.

Similarly, Capt. Marvel gets her powers from a Kree device in the comics but this time it’s from the Psyche-Magnitron – something designed to bestow superpowers to a designated target or user from the start. As a result, Capt. Marvel gained super strength, flight, enhanced senses, photonic blasts, and more following the life-threatening incident.

7 Her Inhibited Strength

Capt. Marvel is one of the most powerful superheroes in both the comics and the MCU. Her raw power surpasses even the cosmic scales, which is why a measly Kree inhibitor keeping her in check didn’t make much sense.

The only way this could be justified is if Capt. Marvel was brainwashed, which happened a lot in the early comics. To subdue her, villains like the Brood, MODOK, and Supreme Intelligence convinced Carol that she wasn’t that powerful. The Kree in the movie had it easy since Carol lost her memories in the blast, making her conditioning less troublesome.

6 Her Nigh-Invulnerability

Over the course of her movie. Capt. Marvel takes a lot of punishment from either Kree soldiers or ships and barely receives a scratch. This isn’t the result of luck, but her passive superhuman abilities in action.

Not only can she absorb energy and force before firing it back at its source, but she also has a quick-acting healing factor that allows her to recuperate in the heat of battle. This could help explain how she effortlessly wiped out a Kree war fleet while tanking Thanos’ Hulk-stopping punches and a Power Stone blast later in Endgame.

RELATED: Every Single Avengers Movie (In Chronological Order)

5 Her Photon Blasts

It’s unclear what exactly the Tesseract’s energies did to Capt. Marvel and how they gave her an assortment of powers, one of which is the ability to fire concentrated photon shots from her hands.

A possible explanation lies in the comics, specifically when the Brood experimented on her and gave her the ability to manipulate the stars’ energies into photon blasts. This is referred to as “The Binary,” since the ability allows Carol to wield the energies of a binary star as a blast of yellow energy. Canonically, there are few beings who can surpass Capt. Marvel’s Binary Form.

4 Her Military Background

Despite suffering from amnesia and being conditioned by the Kree, Capt. Marvel retains her combat prowess and even improves her skills with the addition of her newfound superpowers.

This is because Carol’s airforce training on Earth is heavily engrained in both her body and mind. While glimpses of her army days and some flight training are shown in the movie, her military background is a lot more grueling and extensive in the comics. This is also why she exudes leadership and commands respect wherever she goes – she’s military authority incarnate.

3 Capt. Marvel’s Network

By being born on Earth and being trained by the Kree, it’s established in the comics that Capt. Marvel networked around the universe. This may explain her expansive knowledge of the cosmos despite being a (temporarily) brainwashed Kree soldier with limited memories.

In her cinematic appearances, Capt. Marvel is familiar with the universe’s many planets and races, even guiding the Skrulls to their new homeworld. It’s implied that she knows exactly how to help different worlds affected by Thanos’ snap, though it’s never shown. Perhaps her many galactic connections proved useful during these off-world missions.

RELATED: Marvel: 5 Things We Hope The Endgame Re-Release Reveals (& 5 Things We Hope It Doesn’t)

2 Her Seventh Sense

Capt. Marvel always seemed to appear at the right moment, coming in the nick of time to save the day. This was best seen in her Avengers appearances when she lucked into Tony Stark and arrived at the last minute to turn the tides of war against Thanos.

If Carol retained her Seventh Sense from the comics, her conveniently great timing would make a lot more sense. Simply put, this instinct allows her to feel major changes anywhere in the universe. This could also be why she left Earth post-Infinity War, sensing trouble on a cosmic scale.

1 The Real Carol Danvers

Despite being different sides of the same person, the stoic Kree fighter Vers and the rebellious human pilot Carol have overlapping traits that made it hard for some to differentiate the two.

Carol had a similar dual identity in her earlier comics, but it’s better laid out. Previously, Ms. Marvel was an entirely new persona that Carol could switch to – not unlike Billy Batson and Shazam. The trade-off was that Carol lost her emotions whenever she became the hot-blooded Kree warrior. If not for Prof. Xavier’s help, Carol would never have been able to feel anything as Ms. Marvel.

NEXT: 10 Best Avengers Quotes


2019-07-13 07:07:11

Angelo Delos Trinos

King THOR’s New Look Revealed in Marvel Comics | ScreenRant

Warning: SPOILERS for War of The Realms Omega

Years from now fans will still be talking about Jason Aaron’s run on Marvel’s Thor comics, a years-long story that has recently culminated in the god of thunder accepting his destiny as the new All-Father Thor, King of Asgard. But as fans gather to see his reign begin, one thing is clear: the new Thor sure isn’t the one fans once knew.

Stronger, smarter, and yet somehow still humble, the War of The Realms has proven to be the fire which forged an Asgardian like none before. The immediate future of the Thor series is being kept quiet, deciding where his new role as All-Father may take him (before his ancient self ends his story doing battle with Loki in his King Thor comic series). Whatever twists may be coming, and no matter how many eyeballs or limbs were lost in the fight, fans of Thor would regret it if they didn’t feast their eyes on the new All-Father that emerged from the flames mightier than ever before.

RELATED: Marvel Confirms Thor Was Unworthy of Mjolnir Until [SPOILER]

As anyone even casually aware of the comic book Thor already knows, the War of The Realms has changed Marvel’s Universe across all of the Ten Realms. It was the war Thor was born to fight, and the test he was destined to pass, earning his place as the master of Asgard’s fate. But as War of The Realms Omega shows, the clean-up is going to be just as challenging as victory. More, in fact, when you consider how quickly Thor actually won. It’s a task that previous Thors may have run from, or trembled in the face of but as the new All-Father Thor returns to Earth, his new look is that of a king of gods.

The fact that Thor upgraded his arm with the Destroyer’s, and then used it to cut through entire armies will always be a striking image. The sign of his wisdom being earned from the World Tree itself comes in the form of Thor’s his missing eye, just like his father Odin in his glory days. And of course it may look the same, but Thor’s new Mjolnir is the most powerful yet. This costume may change at any point, even if the arm and eye are honor. And with Thor trading his red cloth cape for a thick animal fur cloak, the result is as close to a recreation of Odin as fans are likely to get (or Thor is willing to offer). One thing is clear: the King of Asgard won’t have anyone questioning if he’s up to the job ever again. Read on below for the full solicitation details for War of The Realms Omega #1.

  • WAR OF THE REALMS OMEGA #1
  • Writer: Jason Aaron, Al Ewing, Gerry Duggan, Daniel Kibblesmith
  • Art: CANO, Oscar Bazaldua, Juan E. Ferreyra, Ron Garney
  • Cover: Phil Noto
  • HE WAR IS OVER – AND THE MARVEL UNIVERSE MUST PICK UP THE PIECES! Midgard is broken, and as heroes of Asgard and Earth alike start to sift through the pieces, new heroes — and villains — emerge. What’s next for Jane Foster, now free of the hammer she was willing to die to hold? Thor’s brother Loki faced a terrible fate in the War of the Realms — and now the god of mischief must make himself anew. For the Punisher, the war isn’t even close to finished — but this time, he’s got his own army. And for Thor himself, destiny has finally arrived. The God of Thunder strikes out for a whole new adventure!

War of The Realms Omega #1 is available now at your local comic book shop, or direct from Marvel Comics.

MORE: The MCU Wasted Thor, & Marvel Comics Just Proved It


2019-07-13 01:07:26

Andrew Dyce

DC Universe is Coming For Marvel Unlimited With 21,000+ Comics

DC has rolled out a big update for its DC Universe streaming service, adding over 21,000 comics for subscribers’ reading pleasure. The service is now a big competitor for Marvel Unlimited, as Unlimited only features comics while DC has both comics and original shows.

Although it may feel like DC Universe just launched, the streaming service has been available since September of last year. Content is expanding, and what’s already there has been liked by fans. Titans was the first show to be featured. Although the first trailer was controversial, a number of subscribers have enjoyed the show and are eagerly anticipating season 2. Doom Patrol is very well liked. Arguably, the most popular show is Young Justice: Outsiders, the sequel to the canceled Cartoon Network series. Upcoming shows include a Harley Quinn animated series, Swamp Thing (though it had its episode count diminished), and Stargirl.

Related: Doom Patrol Is A Hit – But It Can’t Beat Titans’ Popularity

After an announcement in March, DC Universe now features a complete selection of comics from throughout DC’s history. According to a press release, DC Universe has digital access to over 21,000 individual issues. Although you can’t use the service to keep up with the current weekly issues, as there has to be one year of release from any given issue, it’s still a very useful resource for subscribers. Except for current issues, users should be able to find any DC comic. Plus, issues will be added monthly. (An issue that’s releasing tomorrow will be available one year later, as an example of how releases work.) As for reading features, the service will have page mode, an auto-play by panel, and cloud bookmarks to remember where one left off. Also, subscribers can download issues for offline reading similar to downloading movies on Netflix.

Comic recommendations will be given to subscribers based on current and upcoming movies, series, and DC’s original streaming content. So, users can probably expect some essential stories with The Joker to tie into the upcoming Joaquin Phoenix film, for example. Of course, subscribers will be able to create their own playlists as well.

DC’s digital comic lineup is impressive. A person who may only be a casual comic reader now has a chance to read a multitude of issues instantly. It’s also a great resource for reading material that movies and shows are based on. Maybe someone is watching the final season of Gotham and wants to see how No Man’s Land went down in the comics, for example. Those concerned that DC Universe would see a price hike due to a large catalog of comics can rest easy. DC Universe is still $7.99 a month or $74.99 a year. For some DC fans, the price is worth it just for the comics alone.

More: DC Universe Theory: Cyborg’s Dad Erased His Memories of Titans’ Beast Boy

Source: DC Universe


2019-04-23 05:04:04

Daniel Alvarez

Hellboy Failed Because It Was Too Faithful To The Comics

The 2019 Hellboy reboot failed because it was too obsessed in bringing the world of Mike Mignola’s comics to life on the big screen. While the film suffered from various production problems behind the scenes, the movie’s lack of success ultimately stems from it doing too much, too quickly, to try and establish its universe before addressing the film’s central plotline.

After one weekend, it is clear that Hellboy is both a commercial and critical flop. The film fell far short of even the most modest projections of its first-week earnings, barely making over $12 million. The vast majority of reviews are far from kind, with the film scoring a 15% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Related: The Most Brutal Reviews of Hellboy

The chief complaint of many reviews was that Hellboy spent far too much time on exposition, telling the audience about its world rather than letting them see it for themselves as the story unfolded. Christy Lemire of RogerEbert.com described the movie as  “bloated with its many flashbacks and tangents.” Screen Rant‘s Molly Freeman noted that the film had “severe pacing issues” and suggested that the movie’s script tried to emulate a comic book in its formatting but that translating that style of scripting to the screen made the movie disjointed.

It cannot be denied that Hellboy does take its time in getting started, with half of its two-hour runtime passing before our heroes even begin attempting to address the central conflict with the Queen of Blood, Nimue. Before that, we are treated to a series of random scenes where Hellboy travels to Mexico, wrestles a vampire in a lucha libre ring, gets drunk, goes to Colorado, talks with his adopted father, travels to England and is retold his origin story by an oracle, giving us a chance to learn about the vigilante Lobster Johnson. Hellboy then goes on a hunt for giants, fights the giants after being left for dead and is nursed back to health by his old friend, Alice, whose origins as a victim of fairy kidnapping as a baby are also shown in a flashback, before we finally get on with the plot.

While all this material does present a rich vision of Hellboy‘s world and is completely accurate to the original comic books, it is difficult to slog through all of it while working towards the core conflict of the film. In attempting to be faithful to the source material and establish the full histories of its characters, the makers of Hellboy seemingly forgot that a film needs to tell a story. Many of its flashbacks, particularly those detailing how Alice became a medium or how Major Ben Daimio became a werejaguar, are strictly unnecessary to the central narrative. Even those scenes which are essential are erratically placed, such as the movie’s opening with the story of Nimue’s defeat at the hands of King Arthur (with narration from Ian McShane’s Dr. Broom) and then not really doing anything with her storyline for quite some time.

While it seems unlikely that this incarnation of Hellboy will see a sequel (much less become a franchise), one wonders if Mignola’s comics might be more easily adapted for a television series than a movie franchise. BPRD and the various tie-in comics have some great stories to tell and a TV show would prevent the pacing of those stories from having to be rushed to fill a two-hour movie. A BPRD show would also allow more time for flashbacks and tangents to develop the world and the characters. It is something the license holders may wish to consider, given how many other strange comic book series like Lucifer and Doom Patrol are finding success being adapted on streaming services.

More: Hellboy 2019 Is The Opposite Of Venom – And That’s Why It Fails


2019-04-19 09:04:15

Matt Morrison

Iron Man Debuts New GODBUSTER Armor in Marvel Comics

Warning: SPOILERS For Tony Stark: Iron Man #10.

Everyone’s favorite playboy Tony Stark has a new suit of Iron Man armor–and it’s powerful enough to kill a GOD. In fact, Tony himself has named it “The Godbuster Armor” to take on a digital deity in Tony Stark: Iron Man #10.

Tony has found himself in a bit of a sticky situation in “Stark Realities,” trapped by the Motherboard he created in his company’s latest eScape digital reality. After Tony ended up in a coma following the result of Marvel’s Civil War II, he rebuilt himself the best he could. But he knows and fears the same thing fans have wondered for months: he is not the true Tony Stark. He’s merely a simulation of his former self.

RELATED: Iron Man: Tony Stark’s Weirdest Armors Of All Time

This fear allowed him to fall victim to Motherboard’s trap. But once he breaks the spell and discovers that he can make anything possible in this digitally constructed world, he does what he does best, and invents The Godbuster Armor. This new suit has claws, gears, and even what resembles a rocket blaster. In short, it looks like it could defeat a God in one solid hit–and that is exactly what it does.

The Godbuster Armor is extremely powerful and easily takes out the Motherboard, the self proclaimed God of the eScape world. However, it seems to have injured Tony in the process. His eScape body is left not moving, or even breathing, and Jocasta fears he might be dead. We have seen Tony Stark in situations like this before and he seems to always find a way back. If he doesn’t, the rest of his team just might be going up against the Controller alone in the real world. Over the years fans have seen Tony sport dozens, hundreds of different suits of armor – all with different power levels. The Godbuster might be the coolest and strongest yet.

Readers won’t be able to stop themselves from wondering about the possibilities if this suit makes its way to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Thanos would be a sitting duck for the Avengers, and likely short work for Iron Man (Thanos is practically a God, after all). Things would be very different in the MCU if Tony could “imagine” this armor for the big screen, but then… what would be the fun in that?

Will Tony make it out of this story line alive, or will we have to say goodbye to him and his new suit? Marvel Comics teases that not all of the cast will be making it out in one piece, meaning Tony, Jocasta, Andy, Rhodey, Bethany, Amanda, Machine Man, or the Wasp will be defeated before “Stark Realities” finally ends.

Tony Stark: Iron Man #10 is on sale now at your local comic shop, and online from Marvel Comics.

MORE: Iron Man’s New Armor is His Most Ridiculous Yet


2019-04-19 05:04:25

Tessa Smith

10 Surprising Differences Between The Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina Comics And Show

Since it was revealed on last week’s Game of Thrones  episode that Sabrina is Jon Snow’s aunt, it’s a good idea to see if that revelation happens in the comic books as well. That’s a joke and apologies to any Jons out there who have aunts named Sabrina. However, what’s in fact true is that fans are going wild for The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina season two.

Related: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Season 2 Ending Explained

Half of the reason the show is so entertaining is due to the fact that it’s based on a fantastic comic book with the same title. All adaptations change some aspects from the original source material. Check out the list to see the biggest differences between The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina comics and television show!

10 Ambrose

If viewers didn’t know, Sabrina and Ambrose are cousins. This is a necessary reminder due to the fact that Ambrose NEVER calls Sabrina “cousin.” Obviously, that isn’t true. In fact, Ambrose’s signature catchphrase (cousin) is completely absent from the source material. Despite being cousins, Ambrose verbally calls Sabrina cousin only once or twice in the comics. Dang, cuz.  

Another significant change is that the television series explains that the witch council punishes Ambrose by land locking him to Sabrina’s house. However, comic book Ambrose is sent to live with Sabrina after he gets thrown out of his English boarding school for fighting with another student. Another change is that Ambrose’s familiars are two snakes in the comics. The snakes never make an appearance in the show which is an absolute bummer for people who happen to own snakes. 

9 Salem 

We’re gonna let the cat out of the bag right now….There are some big differences between the comic book and television versions of Salem. A surface level change that the show makes is that Salem is a Bombay cat. The comic book, on the other hand, depicts Salem as a Norwegian Forest Tuxedo cat. 

Related: Every Riverdale Connection in Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Season 2

Another aspect that separates the show from its source material is Salem’s backstory. Salem in the Netflix series is a goblin that takes the form of a cat and becomes Sabrina’s familiar. Conversely, the comic book Salem is a warlock that gets turned into a cat as a punishment for breaking sacred witch laws. Of course, the most obvious difference is that Salem doesn’t speak at all in the show. The comic book Salem is a catty cat who loves to talk. Did we squeeze in enough cat jokes? 

8 Harvey Kinkle

Harvey Kinkle is played by Ross Lynch. The love child of Ross Geller and director David Lynch. Even though that’s not a real thing, what is real is that Harvey Kinkle is a football jock in the comic books. One could say Harvey in the television show is more introspective. The guy loves being cooped up in his room and drawing cool stuff. 

It’s safe to assume both versions of the character love Sabrina equally. So much so that comic book Harvey gets caught up in some really nasty witch business for Sabrina’s sake. Let’s just say Harvey’s character arc is more or less similar to his brother’s fate in the show. Also, Harvey doesn’t date anyone else except for Sabrina in the comics. The second season depicts a romantic fling between Harvey and Rosalind. Another addition to the show is that Harvey’s family are witch hunters. The only interests comic book Harvey has are playing football and kissing Sabrina. 

7 Madam Satan 

It’s understandable why Madam Satan prefers to be called Ms. Wardell. There’s a less horrifying ring to that name. Both the comic book and television versions of the character pretend to be on Sabrina’s side in order to lure her into Satan’s grasp. What’s different is how Madam Satan returns from the dead. 

Unlike the Netflix series, Madam Satan has a direct connection to the Archie universe. Madam Satan is brought back by none other than Betty and Veronica. We’ll go ahead and let some folks pick their jaws up off the floor. Betty and Veronica attempt to come up with a love spell that will finally make Archie pick between which of the two girls he loves the most. The spell backfires and ends up bringing Madam Satan back to life. What’s cool about this element in the comic book is that it proves the Riverdale and Sabrina universes can naturally crossover if the producers ever want to take the shows into that direction. 

6 Signing The Book 

If Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and The Witch taught viewers anything, it’s that if a terrifying goat-man asks someone to sign a book they should immediately run in the opposite direction of said goat-man. The show’s first season culminates in a tragic (or triumphant depending on how one perceives it) moment where Sabrina signs over her life to Satan. Sabrina is granted crazy God-like powers and burns down a bunch of old ladies dressed like pilgrims. Just to clarify, these old ladies also happen to be witches. 

None of that happens in the comic book. The closest Sabrina ever comes to signing the devil’s book takes place in a comic book issue similar to the show’s depiction of her sixteenth birthday. Sabrina fully rejects Satan’s offer and chooses to embrace her human side. Unfortunately, Sabrina’s actions have devastating effects on Harvey. All of this plays out like some sort of brilliant mix of Stephen King horror meets George R.R. Martin-esque tragedy. The point is that the comic book is awesome and everyone needs to read it. Like, right now. 

5 Aunt Zelda 

Who would’ve thought that Sabrina’s aunt was a Nintendo character? Wait, that’s a different Zelda. Something else that’s different is the way Aunt Zelda is portrayed in the Netflix show. 

A major change in the show is that Zelda has a long and complicated backstory with Father Blackwood. Zelda’s relationship with Father Blackwood is completely absent from the comic book. In fact, Zelda and Hilda rarely leave their home in the comics. It’s a necessary creative choice to give Zelda a meatier backstory since television shows demand multiple plot lines in order to keep everything interesting. 

4 Aunt Hilda 

It’s reasonable to say everyone is waiting for the episode where it’s revealed that Hilda is actually the evil mastermind behind all of the bad stuff that happens on the show. There’s just no way a witch can be as nice as Hilda. We’re kidding, Hilda is actually awesome. 

The similarities between the show and the comic book are that Hilda’s core character traits are left intact. Hilda is kind, caring, and clever. That’s where the similarities end. The show features a subplot where Hilda gets a job at a horror-themed book store. It’s there where she meets her love interest, Dr. Cee. Both the book store and Dr. Cee never appear in the comic books. Rather, Hilda is always busy running the funeral home. Can someone please open up a real-life version of that book store?

3 Academy of Unseen Arts 

The Academy of Unseen Arts has to be the smallest school of all time. It’s literally just a lobby. Regardless of its small size, the Academy of Unseen Arts is a big part of the television show. 

However, the Academy of Unseen Arts isn’t in the comic books. The comics depict Sabrina learning about witchcraft from her aunts. All of the teenage drama in the comic books comes from Sabrina’s high school experiences in the mortal world. This particular change to the show seems like something that has really resonated with viewers. The Academy of Unseen Arts is like Hogwarts except that it’s filled with much hunkier warlocks. 

2 Love Triangle 

Are viewers team Snick (Sabrina + Nick) or Habrina (Harvey + Sabrina)? We gotta work on those nicknames. Anyway, the television show features a love triangle involving Nick, Sabrina, and Harvey. 

Related: Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina: 5 Reasons Fans Are Team Harvey (& 5 Reasons Fans Are Team Nick)

So much of the drama comes from Sabrina’s feelings for these two guys. Nick has even become a fan favorite character. None of this is in the comic book. In fact, Nick isn’t even a character that existed until the television show. The comics feature a much more straight forward narrative that solely revolves around Sabrina and Harvey’s relationship. We apologize to anyone who had been planning on reading the comic books just for Nick. 

1 Sabrina

The biggest difference is that Sabrina is actually not named Sabrina in the comics. Rather, her name is actually Jughead. This was a test to make sure everyone is still paying attention. 

All jokes aside, there’s a few changes the show makes to Sabrina’s character. One major change is that Sabrina is a high school political activist in the Netflix show. Sabrina’s fight for feminism is completely absent from the comic books. Another deviation from the source material is that Sabrina doesn’t ever dip her toe into the dark side. The show, on the other hand, has fun with Sabrina’s conflict of wanting to do good while being tempted by Satan. Either way, both versions of the character never lose sight of Sabrina’s timeless appeal. Even though Sabrina is a witch, she is someone who goes through the same teenage experiences as any other mortal.

NEXT: What To Expect From Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina Season 3


2019-04-17 03:04:44

Nathaniel Vanderpoort

10 Possible Storylines For The Upcoming Deadpool Movie (Based On The Comics)

After a long and difficult road to getting his own solo film, the Deadpool films are currently among the biggest of superhero franchises. The R-rated, fourth-wall-breaking nature of the character was a risk but ended up being a much-needed fresh take on the genre. While some worried how the franchise would fare with the Disney-Fox deal, Disney has confirmed they plan to make more Deadpool films in the future.

RELATED: 10 Ways Disney Can Make The Deadpool Franchise Work

There are so many exciting places to take the character, and plenty of great comic book stories the future films can draw from. Deadpool and Deadpool 2 drew a lot of inspiration from particular comic arcs to great effect. Looking forward at the franchise’s future, here are some of the best storylines from the comics that the Deadpool movies should use.

10 Deadpool Vs The Hulk

Though some fans worried that joining Disney would result in a watered down version of Deadpool, the merger also provides a lot of potential for the future. The comics have always had great fun showing Deadpool interacting with other Marvel heroes. Now they can do that in the movies without being restricted to just the X-Men universe.

RELATED: Every Fox/Marvel Movie Ranked, From Worst To Best

Deadpool Vs Hulk is a great story that is now a possibility. The story follows Deadpool who, after becoming bored and depressed with his life, picks a fight with The Hulk in an effort to end it all. Just the thought of these two very different characters facing off is enough to set the box office on fire.

9 With Great Power Comes Great Coincidence

One of the greatest aspects of Deadpool is his penchant for meta-comedy. His tendency to break the fourth wall allows the comics to comment on the medium itself and the history of Marvel comics at large. The story With Great Power Comes Great Coincidence is a fantastic example of how well this can be done.

The story finds Deadpool and Blind Al trapped in another dimension, which just so happens to be within the pages of a classic Spider-Man comic. While it might be a difficult story to transition to live action, an animated take on this story could be a real winner.

8 Night Of The Living Deadpool

Deadpool is one of those rare characters who can be transplanted into just about any genre. Not only will he fit in any world, but he’ll likely breathe some new life into it as well. Case in point, this comic story that has Deadpool in the midst of a zombie apocalypse.

Zombie movies can be a bit tiresome, but a Deadpool zombie movie just sounds like a whole lot of fun. It could be a superhero version of Shaun of the Dead. Since Deadpool isn’t weighed down but reality, why not have the movies see how wild they can get?

7 Dead Reckoning

So far, the Deadpool movies have found success in telling smaller, more personal stories. Indeed, Deadpool is not really the kind of character that needs to be involved with the world-saving adventures of the other heroes. However, a movie based on the Dead Reckoning story would give Deadpool a chance to be that kind of hero, albeit in a very Deadpool way.

RELATED: 8 Superhero Teams We Want To See In The MCU Now That Disney Owns Fox

A movie based on this story could fully explore Deadpool’s heroic nature or lack thereof. Does he have the capacity to be utterly selfless and try to save the world? Or would he rather see it all come crashing down just for the fun of it?

6 A Kiss, A Curse, A Cure

One of the most interesting aspects of the Marvel universe that has yet to be explored in the films is Death. In the comics, Death is a personified character who plays a big role in several storylines. She is famously Thanos’ muse and inspiration for wiping out half the universe. But she has also had a very interesting relationship with Deadpool.

This storyline explores the attraction between these two and the many complications that come with it. They want to be united, but Deadpool is a character that cannot die. This might be the ideal way of finally bringing Death to the big screen.

5 Dead Presidents

The comics can be really weird. And as much as the MCU does justice to the source material in various ways, sometimes the comics are just too “out there” for them to tackle. But if any character could fully embrace the insanity of the comics, it’s Deadpool. And the Dead Presidents storyline is the perfect opportunity to go all out.

The title of the story is not misleading. It is about all the past and deceased presidents of the United States being resurrected as zombies and Deadpool is tasked with re-killing them. It’s bizarre, it’s violent, it’s violent — the perfect Deadpool story.

4 Whatever Happened to the White Caption Boxes?

The voices inside Deadpool’s head have been a big part of his character and an aspect that has not yet been explored in the films. In the comics, those voices inside his head are referred to as the “little white boxes”. In this amazing storyline, those voices actually become personified.

RELATED: Canadian Easter Eggs In The Deadpool Movies You Might Have Missed

A part of Deadpool’s personality breaks off and comes to life in the form of Madcap, a forgettable Captain America villain from the past who shares a lot of similarities with Deadpool. Not only would this be a great way to look at Deadpool’s mental issues, but the face-off between these two characters would be highly entertaining.

3 The Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Deadpool is one of the funniest characters in the Marvel universe, but it’s easy to forget that he is also a very tragic character. The Good, The Bad and the Ugly offers a lot of Deadpool’s trademark humor, but it is also incredibly heartbreaking.

After learning that the Weapon X program has been revived in North Korea and they are using Deadpool’s organs to create new mutants, he is forced to confront his dark past. With memorable appearances from Captain America and Wolverine, this is an epic story that added a lot of depth to the character of Deadpool.

2 Deadpool Kills The Marvel Universe

One of the most exciting things we’re looking forward to with the next Deadpool movie is how he’ll comment on now being a part of the MCU. While they need to handle his involvement in that universe carefully, this famous storyline could be the perfect commentary.

In Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe, Deadpool begins hearing a new voice in his head that instructs him to carry out a specific mission — killing everyone. What follows is Deadpool dispatching all our favorite heroes in violent ways. It would be hard to pull off but it could serve as the perfect end to the Deadpool trilogy.

1 Deadpool Kills Deadpool

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse showed how much fun could be had by exploring the multi-dimensions of the Marvel universe. Deadpool could have a similar adventure by adapting Deadpool Kills Deadpool for the big screen.

The story centers on an evil Deadpool from another universe who sets out to kill all other versions of Deadpool. It’s up to the Deadpool in our universe to stop him. There is so much potential in a story like this and imagine the fun of Ryan Reynolds getting to play every strange version of Deadpool that appears.

NEXT: 9 Casting Decisions That Hurt The Deadpool Movies (And 11 That Saved It)


2019-04-12 11:04:58

Colin McCormick

8 Likely Storylines From The Comics For Titans Season 2 (With Jason Todd As A Regular)

Titans is coming back for a second season on DC Universe streaming and there is some big news for the returning show. First, the bad guys have been announced — or at least who might end up being bad guys in the future. Triton is still around causing problems but Esai Morales has signed on to play Deathstroke while Chella Man and Chelsea Zhang have signed on to play his kids, Jericho and Rose Wilson.

RELATED: Titans Season 2: Jason Todd Actor Promoted To Series Regular

Add in the fact that Superboy/Conor Kent will make his debut on the show, as portrayed by Joshua Orpin, and Jason Todd (Curran Walters) will be taking on a larger role as well in the second season. With so many new characters, and so many legendary storylines to pull ideas from, here are eight Teen Titans stories that could be great for the second season of Titans.

8 THE JUDAS CONTRACT

Possibly the least interesting storyline that Titans can attack in season 2 is “The Judas Contract.” This is probably the best Teen Titans story of all-time but was just recently told in an animated movie, showcasing the betrayal by member Terra and the damage it did to the Titans as a team. However, with Deathstroke coming, this is the story that seems like a good bet for the live-action DC Universe television series. It is also a way to bring in something that was only hinted at in the animated movie if they choose to bring Jericho into the story as a key player since he was only a cameo in that previous effort.

RELATED: Titans Season 2 Casts Chella Man As Deathstroke’s Son Jericho

7 A LONELY PLACE OF DYING

Jason Todd will have a key role in season 2 of Titans which brings up a couple of interesting ideas for the character and his place in the DC Universe television series. One of these ideas is the “Lonely Place of Dying” storyline. Of course, this isn’t just a Teen Titans storyline, but is also a shared Batman storyline — but it could still work.

The story was a crossover between Batman and New Titans. In the story, Dick Greyson is Nightwing and this series introduces the new Robin — Tim Drake. This happens after the death of Jason Todd, so one might wonder if the fact that Titans is so dark, to begin with — they might kill off Jason in order to bring in the superior Tim Drake version of Robin.

6 FAMILY LOST

Teen Titans: Family Lost is another Deathstroke story and might be more interesting than rehashing the Judas Contract storyline. The story even includes the same villains from that previous story, with Brother Blood joining Deathstroke. Geoff Johns and Mike McKone created the storyline, which ran in volume 3 of the Teen Titans comic book series.

The story also includes Trigon (as well as Conor Kent as Superboy), so this could be a great way to lead from the huge cliffhanger ending of Titans season 1 and also introduce Deathstroke and his daughter Rose Wilson to the show as well.

RELATED: Titans Season 2 Casts Deathstroke’s Daughter Ravager

5 A KID’S GAME

It seems like every great Teen Titans storyline includes a battle with Deathstroke. Teen Titans: A Kid’s Game is no different as the Titans battle Deathstroke, Ares and even Jericho in this storyline. It even involves an appearance by The Justice League, although there is no way that will happen on the DC Universe television series.

This storyline, in the comic books, takes place immediately following “Graduation Day” and the disbanding of Young Justice. That can’t play into their either, but Titans proved in season 1 that it didn’t care about playing things straight with the comic book lines anyway. The characters in this story are not the same ones on the TV show but this is about creating the organized team and that is where Titans needs to head very soon.

4 PROJECT CADMUS

Season 1 of Titans really looked into the idea of the government — or at least secret organizations — capturing and experimenting on super-powered children. However, the final scene of the season showed a scene very familiar to fans of Young Justice. The scene showed Cadmus — somewhere in Metropolis — where Superboy walked out of the lab.

Behind him was what looked like dead Cadmus scientists and then we see Krypto with glowing red eyes. While the Titans have a lot to deal with as season 2 starts, there is no way that Cadmus allows Conor Kent to just walk out and Titans will have to deal with the fallout of Superboy escaping and that means a Cadmus related storyline is coming.

RELATED: DC’s Doom Patrol Includes Superboy and Krypto Titans Easter Egg

3 TITANS AROUND THE WORLD

The second season of Titans has a chance to add some new blood to the already established team of Robin, Starfire, Raven and Beast Boy. Released in 2006, Titans: Around the World tells the story of the group recovering after a major event and welcoming someone new.

In the comics, it was Infinite Crisis, but on the Titans television show, it could be anything. This was also the series that introduced Miss Martian to the team as a full-fledged member and while Young Justice fans get plenty of the heroic Martian, how cool would it be to bring her into the fold in the live-action DC series as well? It also brings back Jericho — which could play into the introduction of Deathstroke as well.

RELATED: Flash Confirmed To Exist In The Titans DC Universe By Doom Patrol

2 WHO IS DONNA TROY?

Donna Troy in Titans was one of the most normal members of the first season’s cast of characters. She didn’t arrive until the eighth episode and was revealed to be Wonder Woman’s sidekick when she was younger. On the TV series, Donna is now a photojournalist who stepped away from the role of a costumed superhero.

With that said, the idea of Donna Troy getting a big storyline based around her is a very interesting proposition. New Teen Titans: Who is Donna Troy really dives deep into the origins of Wonder Girl where she learns that everything she thought was true was all a lie and now Donna Troy is needed to save the original Titans of Greek mythology.

RELATED: Young Justice Theory: Season 3 Is Setting Up a Major Titans Conflict

1 RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS

The biggest news coming into season 2 of Titans wasn’t the arrival of Deathstroke and Jericho but the fact that Jason Todd would end up playing a major role in the season. As the first season showed, Jason Todd was the kid who took on the role of Robin after Dick Greyson moved on and became Batman’s new sidekick.

Jason showed in the first season to be incredibly violent and unhinged. With Titans willing to take chances by switching up characters from their original history, could DC Universe take Jason out of the Robin role and move him into the Red Hood role? Remember, Starfire in the comics teamed with Jason in The Outlaws and that could really cause some drama with Dick Greyson.

NEXT: Red Hood Finally CONFIRMED in DC’s Young Justice


2019-04-10 03:04:54

Shawn S. Lealos