Posts

5 Films You Didn’t Know Were Graphic Novel Adaptations (& 5 That Need To Be Made)

Little by little over the years, movie-goers have been learning what comic book fans have known for decades now: you can tell whatever story you want to tell in a comic book. Besides the superheroes that we’ve all known about and loved for years like Spider-Man, Superman, Batman, and Wolverine; there have been other heroes birthed out of the comic books. Movies and television shows like The MaskTank Girl, and The Walking Dead are all derived from comic books and graphic novels.

RELATED: 10 Walking Dead Characters Sorted Into Their Hogwarts Houses

The comic book business has always been a place where authors can explore any and all themes, with any set of characters their imaginations could dream up. It’s why pulp comics, horror comics, and sci-fi comic books were around until the dawn of the superhero. It’s that very same imagination of authors that keeps all sub-genres of comic books going. Sometimes the story gets adapted into a film, and while it doesn’t seem like it came from a comic book, it did. Here are five examples, along with some graphic novels that haven’t been adapted (but totally deserve to be).

10 Adaptation: The Road To Perdition

Tom Hanks says “no more mister nice guy” and becomes a hitman for the mob in 2002’s Road To Perdition. The film adapted from the 1998 Paradox Press series is taken very seriously as a film. Especially when you consider the cast and the story of the movie.

Hanks plays mob enforcer Michael O’Sullivan. His boy, Michael Jr., witnesses a murder, and they take off to protect Michael Jr. while dear old dad does some dirty work to keep him safe.

9 Needs To Be Made: Maus

For many reasons, Art Spiegelman’s Maus is not only the most important comic on this list, it’s one of the most important comic books of all time. A Survivor’s Tale is all about Spiegelman’s relationship with his father, Vladek, a Holocaust survivor telling his tale of the horror of living in the camps.

Spiegelman used various animals like mice (Maus) and cats to depict the various peoples involved. Spiegelman has actually rejected all kinds of offers over the years to adapt the seminal piece, which means it will be a long time before Maus becomes a movie, if it ever does.

8 Adaptation: A History Of Violence

There is a section of comic book fans who bemoan the Hollywood elite for not recognizing films like Avengers: Endgame come awards season. Hopefully that will change this year, but comic book movies actually have been getting plenty of love from the academy for a long time. Paradox Press’ A History Of Violence is a pretty decent example of that love.

RELATED: The Witcher: 5 Book Storylines The Show Could Adapt (& 5 Games Storylines We Hope To See)

A couple of thugs try to rob a diner that Tom Stall (Viggo Mortensen) owns. They find out pretty quickly that they came to the wrong diner. Stall becomes a local celebrity from the ordeal and the mob come looking for him, believing he’s Joey Cusack, who’s been in the run from the Irish mob. William Hurt was nominated for Best Supporting Actor and the film for Best Adapted Screenplay.

7 Needs To Be Made: Batman: The Long Halloween

While Batman has been adapted numerous times, no live action Bat-story has tried to be a frightful adaptation of one story. The Long Halloween is one of best examples of why we all love the Caped Crusader.

Set following the events of Year One, the Batman is still building his alliance with Gordon and forging a new one with Harvey Dent. There’s supervillains galore and a mob war being ignited thanks to the Holiday Killer, who comes after at least one person once a month to celebrate a holiday.

6 Adaptation: Ghost World

Not only has Scarlet Johansson starred in a comic book movie before, she’s even been on screen with “Thor” before! Thora Birch and the future Black Widow costar in the adaptation of Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World. Enid (Birch) and Rebecca (Johansson) are two teenage outcasts who are ripping on pop culture and whatever they feel the need to do.

It’s reminiscent of plenty of teen angst films of the late nineties. As the girls grow a little older, they start to drift apart due to the the perils of growing up and the choices that they make.

5 Needs To Be Made: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

Emil Ferris’ debut graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters is an epic tome at over 700 pages. She takes a slew of inspiration from growing up in Chicago and loving horror to tell the story of Karen Reyes, a young girl investigating her neighbor’s death in the sixties.

RELATED: Stranger Things: 10 Most Romantic Moments, Ranked

Between the trope of growing up in the turbulent sixties and the horror elements, Monsters could be a new Stranger Things for the baby boomer generation.

4 Adaptation: The Crow

James O’Barr was inspired by the real-life death of his girlfriend when he created The Crow in 1989. The success of the story led to the 1994 film. In a time when comic book movies weren’t coming out weekly, this one was –and still is– held in high regard.

It became a movie for grunge-loving outcasts and mainstream movie goers alike. Sadly, there hasn’t been a better Crow movie since this one and it forever remains a sign of what would’ve become of the film’s star, Brandon Lee.

3 Needs To Be Made: Saga

When Star Wars came out in theaters, it was so genre-defining that seemingly all of Hollywood got together and commissioned a slew of science fiction and space opera movies to try and find the next big sci-fi craze.

With the serial trilogy winding down, should Hollywood want to do that again, they might want to take a look at Brian K. Vaughn’s Saga. Critics and fans have likened to story to Romeo & Juliet, Star Wars, Game Of Thrones, Lord Of The Rings, or any combination of those staples.

2 Adaptation: Red

What do life-long spies and spooks do when they’re getting a little long in the tooth? They actually just keep on fighting. Based on Warren Ellis’ mini-series, Red tells the story of Frank, a retired CIA agent who is so lonely that he tried to find reasons to chat with Sarah, who works in administration.

His past comes back to haunt him, and when he fears that they’ve bugged his phone, he takes Sarah (initially against her will), since the assassination squad would have bugged her phone too. The Golden-Globe-nominated comedy stars Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Morgan Freeman, and Mary Louise Parker all parodying their usual typecast roles.

1 Needs To Be Made: Black Hole

It’s the seventies and free love is all abound in Seattle. But when the free lovin’ turns into a disease causing black holes and boils, it might be time to stop getting it on.

That’s the premise of Black Hole by Charles Burns. The story is rife for genre loving directors like Wes Anderson, Kevin Smith, or even David Fincher, who was attached to try and bring this to the screen at one point.

NEXT: The 10 Most Bizarre Weapons In Sci-Fi Movies, Ranked


2019-07-14 01:07:18

Eric Rhodes

5 Films You Didn’t Know Were Graphic Novel Adaptations (& 5 That Need To Be Made)

Little by little over the years, movie-goers have been learning what comic book fans have known for decades now: you can tell whatever story you want to tell in a comic book. Besides the superheroes that we’ve all known about and loved for years like Spider-Man, Superman, Batman, and Wolverine; there have been other heroes birthed out of the comic books. Movies and television shows like The MaskTank Girl, and The Walking Dead are all derived from comic books and graphic novels.

RELATED: 10 Walking Dead Characters Sorted Into Their Hogwarts Houses

The comic book business has always been a place where authors can explore any and all themes, with any set of characters their imaginations could dream up. It’s why pulp comics, horror comics, and sci-fi comic books were around until the dawn of the superhero. It’s that very same imagination of authors that keeps all sub-genres of comic books going. Sometimes the story gets adapted into a film, and while it doesn’t seem like it came from a comic book, it did. Here are five examples, along with some graphic novels that haven’t been adapted (but totally deserve to be).

10 Adaptation: The Road To Perdition

Tom Hanks says “no more mister nice guy” and becomes a hitman for the mob in 2002’s Road To Perdition. The film adapted from the 1998 Paradox Press series is taken very seriously as a film. Especially when you consider the cast and the story of the movie.

Hanks plays mob enforcer Michael O’Sullivan. His boy, Michael Jr., witnesses a murder, and they take off to protect Michael Jr. while dear old dad does some dirty work to keep him safe.

9 Needs To Be Made: Maus

For many reasons, Art Spiegelman’s Maus is not only the most important comic on this list, it’s one of the most important comic books of all time. A Survivor’s Tale is all about Spiegelman’s relationship with his father, Vladek, a Holocaust survivor telling his tale of the horror of living in the camps.

Spiegelman used various animals like mice (Maus) and cats to depict the various peoples involved. Spiegelman has actually rejected all kinds of offers over the years to adapt the seminal piece, which means it will be a long time before Maus becomes a movie, if it ever does.

8 Adaptation: A History Of Violence

There is a section of comic book fans who bemoan the Hollywood elite for not recognizing films like Avengers: Endgame come awards season. Hopefully that will change this year, but comic book movies actually have been getting plenty of love from the academy for a long time. Paradox Press’ A History Of Violence is a pretty decent example of that love.

RELATED: The Witcher: 5 Book Storylines The Show Could Adapt (& 5 Games Storylines We Hope To See)

A couple of thugs try to rob a diner that Tom Stall (Viggo Mortensen) owns. They find out pretty quickly that they came to the wrong diner. Stall becomes a local celebrity from the ordeal and the mob come looking for him, believing he’s Joey Cusack, who’s been in the run from the Irish mob. William Hurt was nominated for Best Supporting Actor and the film for Best Adapted Screenplay.

7 Needs To Be Made: Batman: The Long Halloween

While Batman has been adapted numerous times, no live action Bat-story has tried to be a frightful adaptation of one story. The Long Halloween is one of best examples of why we all love the Caped Crusader.

Set following the events of Year One, the Batman is still building his alliance with Gordon and forging a new one with Harvey Dent. There’s supervillains galore and a mob war being ignited thanks to the Holiday Killer, who comes after at least one person once a month to celebrate a holiday.

6 Adaptation: Ghost World

Not only has Scarlet Johansson starred in a comic book movie before, she’s even been on screen with “Thor” before! Thora Birch and the future Black Widow costar in the adaptation of Terry Zwigoff’s Ghost World. Enid (Birch) and Rebecca (Johansson) are two teenage outcasts who are ripping on pop culture and whatever they feel the need to do.

It’s reminiscent of plenty of teen angst films of the late nineties. As the girls grow a little older, they start to drift apart due to the the perils of growing up and the choices that they make.

5 Needs To Be Made: My Favorite Thing Is Monsters

Emil Ferris’ debut graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters is an epic tome at over 700 pages. She takes a slew of inspiration from growing up in Chicago and loving horror to tell the story of Karen Reyes, a young girl investigating her neighbor’s death in the sixties.

RELATED: Stranger Things: 10 Most Romantic Moments, Ranked

Between the trope of growing up in the turbulent sixties and the horror elements, Monsters could be a new Stranger Things for the baby boomer generation.

4 Adaptation: The Crow

James O’Barr was inspired by the real-life death of his girlfriend when he created The Crow in 1989. The success of the story led to the 1994 film. In a time when comic book movies weren’t coming out weekly, this one was –and still is– held in high regard.

It became a movie for grunge-loving outcasts and mainstream movie goers alike. Sadly, there hasn’t been a better Crow movie since this one and it forever remains a sign of what would’ve become of the film’s star, Brandon Lee.

3 Needs To Be Made: Saga

When Star Wars came out in theaters, it was so genre-defining that seemingly all of Hollywood got together and commissioned a slew of science fiction and space opera movies to try and find the next big sci-fi craze.

With the serial trilogy winding down, should Hollywood want to do that again, they might want to take a look at Brian K. Vaughn’s Saga. Critics and fans have likened to story to Romeo & Juliet, Star Wars, Game Of Thrones, Lord Of The Rings, or any combination of those staples.

2 Adaptation: Red

What do life-long spies and spooks do when they’re getting a little long in the tooth? They actually just keep on fighting. Based on Warren Ellis’ mini-series, Red tells the story of Frank, a retired CIA agent who is so lonely that he tried to find reasons to chat with Sarah, who works in administration.

His past comes back to haunt him, and when he fears that they’ve bugged his phone, he takes Sarah (initially against her will), since the assassination squad would have bugged her phone too. The Golden-Globe-nominated comedy stars Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Morgan Freeman, and Mary Louise Parker all parodying their usual typecast roles.

1 Needs To Be Made: Black Hole

It’s the seventies and free love is all abound in Seattle. But when the free lovin’ turns into a disease causing black holes and boils, it might be time to stop getting it on.

That’s the premise of Black Hole by Charles Burns. The story is rife for genre loving directors like Wes Anderson, Kevin Smith, or even David Fincher, who was attached to try and bring this to the screen at one point.

NEXT: The 10 Most Bizarre Weapons In Sci-Fi Movies, Ranked


2019-07-14 01:07:18

Eric Rhodes

Marvel: The 10 Best Phase Three Films, According To Rotten Tomatoes

Marvel Phase 3 — the final group of films in The Infinity Saga — just wrapped up with the premiere of Spider-Man: Far From Home. Today, we’re looking at all the Phase 3 Marvel films and seeing how they stack up against one another according to Rotten Tomatoes.

RELATED: MCU: Ten Villains Who Were Kind Of Right

There are eleven Phase 3 films in total, so before we kick off this top-ten list, we’re shouting it out to Captain Marvel. Carol Danvers, maybe your movie ranks last with a Tomatometer score of 78%, but we still think you’re great. So now that we have that covered, it’s time to see how the rest of Marvel’s Phase 3 scores based on critic reviews. Let’s get to it!

10 Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 (84%)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 gave Chris Pratt another run as the quirky, retro Star-Lord, along with the rest of the unique Guardians. Critics found the film to be stocked with action, full of beautiful visuals, and loaded with spunky humor. However, they also found it to be not as exciting and original as its predecessor.

Even so, the film got itself an 84% and a certified-fresh rating. Audiences were also pleased with the film overall, giving it an 87%.

9 Avengers: Infinity War (85%)

Infinity War had the Marvel gang teaming up to defeat Thanos before he destroyed the universe. Combining an ensemble cast with scary-high stakes, the film came out with a certified-fresh Tomatometer rating of 85%. Additionally, it received a similarly impressive audience score of 91%.

The handful of critics who didn’t like the film found the CGI to be gimmicky and the story to be unoriginal. Hardcore Marvel fans, on the other hand, simply anticipated the next installment even more after this one came to a dramatic and tragic close.

8 Ant-Man And The Wasp (88%)

The exciting sequel to Ant-Man had Paul Rudd’s superhero teaming up with Evangeline Lilly’s Wasp for all the action. Critics loved it, earning the movie an 88% Tomatometer score.

RELATED: Ant-Man 3: 5 Reasons We Need It (And 5 We Don’t)

The leading duo’s chemistry combined with Rudd’s already charming on-screen presence allowed the film to feel fresh and engaging. Some thought it didn’t match the charisma and unique charm of the first Ant-Man, but most begged to differ. Viewers left it with a 76% audience score.

7 Doctor Strange (89%)

Doctor Strange gave Benedict Cumberbatch the chance to shape the time-travel superhero’s origin stories. He certainly did not disappoint.

While the narrative was original and compelling, it artfully stayed within the bounds of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, earning it an 89% Tomatometer rating. While a handful of critics found the titular character to be unconnectable and the film to be an unnecessary addition to an already-huge franchise, it still raked in the love. Its audience score stands at 86% based on over 109,000 ratings.

6 Spider-Man: Far From Home (90%)

The latest film to swoop into the Marvel Cinematic Universe saw everyone’s friendly neighborhood Spider-Man (played by Tom Holland) taking on his next adventure. This time, it takes place during Peter Parker’s European vacation with his classmates instead of at home in New York.

Critics loved the film for blending young romance and superhero action. It’s more down-to-earth than some films in the MCU, coming off as both engaging and fun. Some called out the film for having messy character arcs, poor visual effects, and a complicated plot. But is it better to listen to those people, or is it better to hear out the others who gave it a 90% Tomatometer rating? Viewers liked it even more, with 96% of audience reviews coming in positive.

5 Captain America: Civil War (91%)

Captain America: Civil War saved theatergoers in 2016 with a blockbuster-worthy plot, courageous themes, and a ton of added depth. It followed Steve Rogers and Tony Stark’s competing agendas, which ultimately led them to grow back together even stronger than before in the final few MCU installments.

RELATED: 10 Things The MCU’s Fantastic Four Reboot Needs

With some critics even calling it the best Marvel movie to ever be made, the film scored itself a 91% on the Tomatometer. The generally positive movie-goer consensus earned it an 89% audience score. Some found it to be over-the-top, but it is a Marvel movie. The thrill is just a part of the journey.

4 Spider-Man: Homecoming (92%)

This Spider-Man reboot had a lot at stake, with the classic hero being reimagined for a third time since Sam Raimi’s trilogy and Sony’s two films. Thankfully, it delivered. The action film earned a 92% Tomatometer score and an 88% audience score.

Homecoming was praised for — while being a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe — not getting weighed down by it. The film stood on its own just as much as it stayed a part of the franchise. A few critics found it to be “just another Marvel movie,” but we’re choosing to ignore that notion.

3 Thor: Ragnarok (93%)

Thor’s second sequel is funnier, more colorful, and more exciting than its predecessors. Everything about it is bright and original, and critics noticed. Sure, some found the jokes to be a bit overdone, but the film still pulled out a 93% Tomatometer score and a comparable 87% audience score.

The cast was charming and the chemistry was magnetic. The difference between this one and the previous Thor installment is very noticeable.

2 Avengers: Endgame (94%)

The grand finale to many Marvel characters’ story arcs was met with praise from critics and audiences. The certified-fresh Avengers: Endgame scored a high 94% percent from critics and 91% from audiences. While the epic conclusion was over three hours long, it managed to entertain and captivate viewers for all of them.

There were a handful of critics who found it to be filled with a lot of nothing, but there were even more critics who found it to be jam-packed with everything they’d been waiting for.

1 Black Panther (97%)

Stealing the show with a 97% Tomatometer rating is none other than Black Panther. Its immersive story full of complex characters, stunning aesthetics, and powerful themes have it topping not just our list, but the lists of critics everywhere.

While not every person loved the film, with some calling Black Panther “average,” they are in a pretty small minority. The audience rating came in at 79% with many believing it to be a thrilling and welcome big-budget blockbuster.

NEXT: 10 Reasons Guardians Of The Galaxy Is The MCU’s Best Solo Franchise


2019-07-13 11:07:59

Brooke Bajgrowicz

10 Animated Films That 90s Kids Have Forgotten About | ScreenRant

If you’re not a kid from the ’90s, man, did you miss out! The ’90s were a spectacular time in popular culture, namely for the movies that came reeling out. Besides cult classics like Pulp Fiction, The Matrix, and Jurassic Park, there was a bevy of animated cartoons that have stuck with us ’90s kids well over 20 years later.

RELATED: Every Disney Princess Movie, Ranked

In fact, there are so many spectacular cartoons that came out in the ’90s that some of them have been forgotten about in our incessant nostalgia. It’s almost guaranteed that you have seen the following films, but they aren’t ones that you think of on a regular basis. Maybe you just saw them once, maybe you watch them over and over again, but after this careful reminder, you’ll be itching to get a snippet of these ’90s films again. Here are 10 animated films that ’90s kids have forgotten about.

10 Doug’s First Movie

In 1999, Nickelodeon came out with a film for everyone’s favorite Funnie: Doug Funnie, that is. The television series has proven itself to be one of Nickelodeon’ most successful ’90s animation TV series, alongside shows such as Rugrats and Hey Arnold. The title is Doug‘s First Movie, although sadly, Doug never got a second.

When Doug and his best friend Skeeter discover a creature in Lucky Duck Lake, they learn that their hometown lake is being polluted. After befriending the monster, Doug and his friends work to expose the man behind it all. All of Doug’s main cast appears in the film, including Patti Mayonaise, Roger, and Porkchop, and Doug’s alter-ego, Quailman.

9 A Troll In Central Park

Even if you can’t remember the plot from the film, this picture is sure to elicit some memories. A Troll in Central Park came out in 1994. It’s a musical fantasy comedy film derived from creators of The Land Before Time in All Dogs Go to Heaven. It’s about Stanley the troll who has a magical green thumb that will revive dying flowers or plants.

However, the Kingdom of Trolls does not allow this, and he is taken as a prisoner by Gnorga, the queen. She banishes him to New York’s Central Park, where he finds his friends Gus and Rosie. This film had mediocre success compared to the creator’s other stories, but it’s definitely one every ’90s kid has seen at some point or another.

8 Quest For Camelot

Quest for Camelot is an animated film that is ahead of its time. It came out in 1998 and told the story of Kaylee, whose father, Sir Lionel, is one of the knights of the round table. She wants to be a knight like her father, but her childhood dreams are hindered as an adult.

After an attack on her castle 10 years later, Kaylee becomes the heroine who venturous forth to find Excalibur to save their kingdom. Quest for Camelot has a cast of colorful characters, with the comical two-headed dragons, Devon and Cornwall, helping to steal the show.

7 We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story

If you dig back far enough into your memories, you’ll remember We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story. It’s a 1993 animated film based off of the 1987 children’s book. Coming from the perspective of Rex, the Tyrannosaurus, he and his friends find their way into present-day New York City.

RELATED: 5 ’90s Action Movies That Didn’t Age Well (& 5 That Only Got Better)

The “Brain Grain” is made up of a triceratops named Woog, a Parasaurolophus named Dweeb, and Elsa the Pteranodon. Before this journey, however, they are captured by an alien who infuses the dinosaurs with artificial intelligence. Their inventor, Captain Neweyes, encourages them to go to the Museum of Natural History so that children can see real dinosaurs. On their way, they meet Louis and Cecelia, who help them find their way to the museum.

6 Annabelle’s Wish

Annabelle‘s Wish is most certainly remembered as a Christmas film. Annabelle the calf is given to a mute boy named Billy. Billy lives with his Grandpa Charles Baker on the Tennessee farm.

On Christmas Eve, Santa Claus gives the farm animals a Christmas wish and grants them all the gift of speech. Annabelle reveals their secret to Billy accidentally, which helps bring out a unique friendship. Annabelle acts as Billy’s voice in this telling tale that has more heartfelt symbolism than most other 1997 animated films.

5  Oliver And Company

Oliver and Company may not have been 100% forgotten by most ’90s kids. However, it is rarely revisited as adults in comparison to films like The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast. The film opens up with a heartbreaking scene of the little orange tabby cat, Oliver, being left abandoned in a box on the street.

Oliver finds his home among the stray dogs of New York City (are you starting to see a pattern here?) until he eventually finds Jenny. The film’s cast is made up of a handful of very well-known characters including Billy Joel and Bette Midler.

4 DuckTales The Movie: Treasure Of The Lost Lamp

DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp came out in 1990 after the success of its television series. Scrooge McDuck goes to the Middle East to find a treasure chest. Huey, Dewey, and Louie, of course, assist their uncle in this quest.

RELATED: The 10 Best 90s TV Shows

The story is chock-full of adventure, including a magical Genie, Scrooges’ arrest, and Merlock the evil sorcerer, who is vigorously determined to steal the Genie’s lamp.

3 All Dogs Go To Heaven

Why does it seem that so many ’90s animated films were set to break our little innocent hearts? In 1998, All Dogs Go To Heaven came out in a fantasy-infused musical drama film about a German shepherd named Charlie B. Barkin (are you just now getting that pun?) and his best friend Itchy. Classics songs like “You Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down,” along with the remaining characters, Carface and Killer, should help restore the full memory of this film.

When Carface has Charlie killed, Charlie escapes death by stealing a pocket watch that he finds in Heaven. Under the threat that he can never return, Charlie winds the watch and lands back on Earth, where he is determined to live out his life. Here, he meets Anne-Marie, the loving orphan girl who helps him change his ways.

2 Rescuers Down Under

One of Disney’s less celebrated animated films, The Rescuers Down Under came as a sequel to the 1977 original, The Rescuers. This time, however, the two diligent mice, Bernard and Bianka, are in the Australian outback helping their new young friend, Cody, protect Mahute, a rare golden eagle.

But when the Australian poacher Percival C. McLeach finds out what Cody has been hiding, it’s up to the two small creatures to protect the boy from McLeach and his crocodiles. The Rescuers are always resolute on their adventures, bringing enthusiastic and somewhat thrilling tales to kids of the 1990s.

1 Pokemon: The Movie

Even if you weren’t a Pokémon card collector in the 90s, Pokémon: The Movie enticed young audiences across various backgrounds. Bouncing directly off of the Japanese animated TV series, Ash Ketchum and Pikachu set out to face their most dangerous opponent yet, Mewtwo.

After the incredibly intelligent Pokémon makes an army of enhancing Pokémon clones, it’s up to Ash and his friends to stop him from destroying the planet.

NEXT: 10 Gory Teen Horror Movies From The ‘90s We All Forgot About


2019-07-13 01:07:56

Tiffani Daniel

10 Films Inspired By The Beatles, Ranked | ScreenRant

In Slumdog Millionaire and Trainspotting director Danny Boyle’s latest film, Yesterday, viewers are asked what the world would be like if The Beatles didn’t exist through the eyes of somebody who remembered that they did. This marriage between the Fab Four and film is not a new one, but when people think about this marriage, they are more likely think about films such as A Hard Day’s Night, Help, or Yellow Submarine.

RELATED: Yesterday: Every Beatles Easter Egg & Reference

However, their footprint on the industry has lived on for nearly 50 years since the band called it quits in 1970. From jukebox musicals, to fictional retellings of the bands’ members, to dramas guided by a character’s love for the band, The Beatles have been the basis of several films spanning nearly every genre, but these are some of the most memorable.

10 Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

Memorable doesn’t always mean good, and that certainly is the case with this 1978 Michael Schultz film, which boasts an all-star cast of musicians, comedians, and renowned actors from The Bee Gees to Steve Martin. It told the tale of Billy Shears and the titular band, using Beatles songs to tell the story.

It is a legendarily poor film, but it has charm, including some genuinely enjoyable covers of The Beatles’ greatest hits. Steve Martin’s strange cover of Maxwell’s Silver Hammer was an especially memorable performance, and fans of his musical comedy will not be disappointed with the offbeat performance.

9 Two Of Us

Two of Us takes place in the hours following a 1976 episode of Saturday Night Live when Lorne Michaels said that he would offer The Beatles $3,000 to reunite the band on his show. According to both Lennon and McCartney, the two were actually together when the episode aired and did briefly (albeit jokingly) talk about taking Michaels up on the offer.

The film is mostly a fictionalized recollection of their glory days and aims to look inside the minds of the two most famous Beatles. One notable aspect of the film is its director, Mark Stanfield, who also directed the documentary Let It Be, a film which infamously chronicles the beginning of the end for the band.

8 All This And World War II

The hardest film to find on this list, All This and World War II is actually a documentary that aims to juxtapose the horrors of the catastrophic war to the peaceful tunes of The Beatles. It was a controversial subject for a country that was still reeling from the aftermath of The Vietnam War.

RELATED: Yesterday: Every Beatles Song In The Movie

Although the film has never been released officially since its fateful run in theaters, bootleg copies have been readily available since then, and they show a bizarre mashup of the ’60s culture with the atrocities of war in an attempt at cinematic irony. It has since been re-edited into another film called The Beatles and World War II.

7 Nowhere Boy

Nowhere Boy is one of the few films which aims to tell the story of life before The Beatles, and it does so through the eyes of a young John Lennon, played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Based on a novel written by Lennon’s half-sister, the film paints the portrait of a young Lennon who struggles with problems at homes, gets suspended from school, and eventually joins his first band and meets a pair of other young musicians in Paul McCartney and George Harrison.

In all of The Beatles-inspired movies, it is one of only a handful of movies that have tried to portray the story of the band itself, and Taylor-Johnson plays a believable Lennon with an uncanny resemblance.

6 Across The Universe

In the craze of jukebox musicals over the past 15 years, Across the Universe came and went with far less fanfare than one might have thought in a world with two Mamma Mia films. Directed by legendary Broadway director Julie Taymor, the film tries to tell the story of the era of the Beatles through their music, as the band presumably does not exist in this world.

RELATED: Why Yesterday Doesn’t Have Paul McCartney or Ringo Starr Cameos

The film, while uneven, has some inspired takes on Beatles songs, wonderful performances from Jim Sturgess and Evan Rachel Wood, and enough easter eggs to fill any Beatles aficionado’s basket. It also features guest performances from Bono, who plays a southern cult leader, and veteran Beatles cover artist Joe Cocker.

5 Yesterday

Of course, we have to talk about the film that inspired this list. Danny Boyle often moves between bleak dramas like 28 Days Later and more complex character-driven pieces such as Academy Award winner Slumdog Millionaire. Yesterday is lighter fare than many of his other films and explores a world without The Beatles.

The film is heavy on the music of The Beatles and stars Himesh Patel and Lily James. The film does, as many critics have pointed out, seem to struggle with exactly how to control its premise, and the film can seem at times to take a clichéd look at the rise and fall of a musical artist. Still, between the performances and the music, the film is a delightful romantic comedy filled with many interesting concepts.

4 I Wanna Hold Your Hand

Set among the hysteria of the band’s first trip to America, it focuses on a group of teenagers who are hellbent on seeing the band in person and decide to go to the hotel where the band is staying. The result is a funny, poignant, and delightful comedy that still helps the younger generation understand what it was like at the start of Beatlemania.

Knowing that the director of Forrest Gump got his roots in a film based on the backdrop of Beatlemania should come as no surprise to movie fans, and I Wanna Hold Your Hand was a phenomenal introduction of Zemeckis to the viewing public.

3 All You Need Is Cash

All You Need Is Cash is a hilarious mockumentary film from the mind of Monty Python alums Neil Innes and Eric Idle. The film is equal parts parody and tribute, and tells its story of Dirk McQuickly, Ron Nasty, Barry Wom, and Stig O’Hara—also known as The Rutles. It is told in a series of short sections meant to echo the rise and fall of The Beatles, albeit with the signature wit and humor of its creators.

RELATED: Yesterday Review: Roll Up for the (Sorta) Magical Mystery Tour

The film also features an astounding cast of talent, including SNL veterans Bill Murray, John Belushi, and Dan Aykroyd; Mick Jagger and Paul Simon as themselves; and George Harrison himself. The film was not an immediate success on NBC, but its premiere on the BBC and ensuing popularity made it something of a cult classic to Beatles and comedy fans alike.

2 I Am Sam

Although not directly related to The Beatles in terms of its main plot, I Am Sam is a movie with The Beatles built into its DNA. It tells the story of an intellectually disabled father named Sam Dawson who is fighting for the custody of his daughter, Lucy, who is named after the titular character of The Beatles’ hit song “Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds.”

Due to Sam’s fandom and encyclopedic knowledge of The Beatles, the film is littered with references to the band, its music, and its history. Sam often invokes stories about the band when he doesn’t know exactly what to say, and the movie’s entire soundtrack is filled with Beatles music.

1 That Thing You Do

Although devoid of Beatles music, and the band is only mentioned by name a handful of times, there is, perhaps, no film that captures the magic of Beatlemania through the eyes of the band like Tom Hanks’ directorial debut, That Thing You Do. It tells the story of The Oneders as they rise atop the charts with their hit song that shares the film’s title.

Throughout the film, we see The Oneders go from small-town American young people to international superstars overnight, and many aspects of this rise directly correlate to The Beatles’ early days. There’s the performance on a show remarkably similar to The Ed Sullivan Show, the poppy tone of all the music, and the mish-mash of personalities that eventually leads to the fictional band’s far-quicker breakup.

NEXT: The 10 Best Comedy Movies of All Time, According to IMDB


2019-07-11 03:07:13

Bradley Geiser

10 American Movies You Didn’t Know Were Based Off Of Foreign Films

Remakes can be difficult in the movie business. Sometimes studios think there is an idea too good not to explore again, but audiences can get tired of seeing the same stories done over and over. But what if they are remaking a movie most of the audience has never heard of before?

Hollywood has a tendency to find those golden cinematic gems of other countries and give them an American twist. And while some of these foreign films may have made a splash in the States, there are many the average movie-goer might assume are original ideas. So give some credit to the films that did it first by looking at some of the American films you didn’t know were foreign-language remakes.

RELATED: Ranked: 10 Most Inclusive Films For Kids

10 The Birdcage

The Birdcage was a 1996 star-studded comedy from Hollywood legends Mike Nichols and Elaine May. The film starred Robin Williams, Gene Hackman and Nathan Lane in a wacky caper about an openly gay couple who pretend to be straight when being introduced to their son’s conservative in-laws. The film was a box office hit and was praised for Williams and Lane’s comedic performance.

The film is a remake of an Italian comedy which is actually an adaptation of a stage play of the same name. The original 1978 film was hugely successful, becoming a cross-cultural hit in the States as well.

9 The Departed

Martin Scorsese finally won his long-deserved Oscar for Best Director for this violent gangster film. The movie follows two moles, one working for the police and one working for the mob who play a cat and mouse game, trying to expose the other. The film starred the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Mark Wahlberg and Jack Nicholson and won the Oscar for Best Picture.

The movie is based on the Chinese police drama, Infernal Affairs. While it did not reach the same level of acclaim as its remake, the original was a huge success and gained fans all over the world.

8 Three Men and a Baby

Three Men and a Baby seems like the perfect 80s movie with a cast of the decade’s biggest stars and a concept that would really only work in that decade of filmmaking. The film follows the misadventures of three bachelors, played by Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg and Ted Danson, who unexpectedly have to raise a baby together.

Directed by Spock himself, Leonard Nimoy, the film was a huge hit and spawned a sequel, Three Men and a Little Lady. The original French film, Three Men and a Cradle, only came out two years before Hollywood decided to do their version.

7 EdTV

Long before they starred in the dark and somber first season of True Detective, Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson starred in this forgettable comedy. McConaughey stars as a video store clerk who is chosen for a reality TV program where cameras follow him all day long. The concept had potential but suffered from the fact that it came out shortly after the similar and superior The Truman Show.

RELATED: 10 Action Movie Legends We Want To See In The Expendables 4

Edtv was in fact a remake of a French-Canadian comedy, Louis 19, King of the Airwaves. The original, while a smaller scale, had more success than the American version, becoming a modest hit in its home country.

6 True Lies

Though not the most well-known of James Cameron and Arnold Schwarzenegger’s collaborations, True Lies is nonetheless a fun, funny and thrilling action-comedy. Schwarzenegger stars as a world-class spy who hides his secret world-saving antics begin to conflict with his more mundane family life. Though overshadowed by the Terminator films to a degree, the movie was a hit with audiences and critics.

Le Totale was a French comedy that served as the basis for this film. While Cameron crank up the action and scope of the film, the story and some of its best comedic moments came from the original.

5 Delivery Man

Vince Vaughan has been hit-and-miss with his comedy movie career. While his films like Wedding Crashers and Old School are considered classics, others, like this 2013 dramedy, are utterly forgettable. Delivery Man has Vaughan playing an aimless delivery man who learns that his sperm donations over the years have resulted in over 500 children. The film has a difficult time with its shifting tone leading to an uneven and somewhat creepy final product.

The original French-Canadian film called Starbuck was a hit in Canada and generally thought of as the better film. Despite the original writer-director Ken Scott returning to helm the remake, the American remake failed to connect the same way the original did.

4 Scent Of A Woman

As acclaimed an actor as Al Pacino is, it’s strange to think that he’s only won a single Oscar in his long career. Even stranger, that win came from his rather over-the-top performance in this film. In Scent of a Woman, Pacino plays a brash and impulsive blind man who takes a younger man under his wing. The film proved a hit and, along with Pacino’s win, was nominated for several Oscars.

RELATED: 10 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch Today

The film was a remake of a 1974 Italian film of the same name. Like its eventual remake, the film was a hit in its home country and received high praise the its leading man.

3 Insomnia

Before Christopher Nolan gained the trust of fanboys everywhere with his Dark Knight trilogy, he was making far smaller films, like this 2002 thriller. Al Pacino stars in the film as a Los Angeles detective investigating a murder in a small Alaskan town. Though one of the lesser-known Nolan films, it is nonetheless a stellar thriller featuring a great performance from Pacino as well as a rare villainous turn from Robin Williams.

RELATED: Every Christopher Nolan Movie Ranked, From Worst To Best

The film is based on a 1997 Norwegian film of the same name, starring Stellan Skarsgard in the lead role. Though Nolan’s film is certainly bleak, the original is notable for going even darker with the story.

2 Twelve Monkeys

Twelve Monkeys is one of the most insane and mind-bending time travel films you’re likely to ever see – not surprising as it comes from Terry Gilliam. Set in a post-apocalyptic future, Bruce Willis stars as a prisoner sent back in time to determine what happened to end the world. The film has been praised upon its release and is still considered one of the best films of the 90s.

Though Gilliam is known for his own bizarre ideas, he did in fact get this particular one from a French short film entitled The Jetty. The sci-fi short sets up the same basic plot of Twelve Monkeys as well as provide the remake’s memorable twist ending.

1 Some Like It Hot

Billy Wilder is considered one of the greatest screenwriters in Hollywood history. Therefore, it might surprise some that one of his best films is actually not an original work.

Some Like it Hot is a comedy that follows two struggling lounge singer who, after witnessing a mob assassination, hide out and find unexpected fame as female stage performers. Still considered one of the funniest comedies ever made, the film rightfully earned its classic status. Though based on the German film, Fanfares of Love, Wilder managed to put his own brilliant spin on the material which resulted in a film that will be remembered forever.

NEXT: 10 Bad Movies That Deserve A Remake


2019-04-22 03:04:24

Colin McCormick

Ranked: 10 Most Inclusive Films For Kids

In a more progressive social age, the call for inclusion and diversity in media is being heard loud and clear. We’re able to have gay characters on prime time shows and more people of color are making their way on and off-screen. It’s pretty uplifting to compare movies and TV from the last decade to today. There’s been some good strides made and while we’re not exactly where we want to be, we’re getting there little by little.

But diversity and inclusion still suffers a bit on the big screen for anyone young than say, 15 years old. Children’s television can still only go so far when portraying gay characters and it feels like studios still shy away from being as diverse as they could be for a younger audience. We’re here to highlight a handful of the most inclusive kids’ films. We’re broadening our horizons and really taking intersectionality into account. It’s easier to list off kids’ movies with actors of color, but how about those that deal with mental illness? Disability? LGBT characters?

Here are the 10 most inclusive kids’ films.

RELATED: 10 Best Movies To Watch With Your Kids On Family Night

10 How to Train Your Dragon, Dreamworks

Might be a bit of an odd choice at first, but it’s actually a great example of portraying characters with disabilities without a disability being a “selling” point. More and more studios are getting onboard the diversity and inclusion train, which is great, but oftentimes, it becomes something of a marketing scheme.

How to Train Your Dragon has a wonderful message about self-worth, friendship, and being your best self despite the status quo. Hiccup and Toothless’s disabilities never serve as a way to pity the character or uplift them, rather, it’s a part of who they are. Also, Gobber is one of the few gay characters in children’s media. It started as an ad lib in How to Train Your Dragon 2, but director Dean DeBlois liked it so much, they kept it as part of Gobber’s story.

9 Finding Dory, Pixar

Yes, a movie full of fish made it. Why? It’s so hard to compare to Finding Nemo, especially when that movie took the world by storm and left us begging for more for a decade. While Finding Dory fell short of some expectations, it explored the serious side of Dory’s short term memory loss. While still played as a joke, it held more weight in this movie given that Dory is more challenged by this disability than before.

It teaches children the right way to approach someone who may have a mental disability and to never look down on those who do. Dory’s an incredibly creative thinker and in the end, saves the day without changing who she is. Oh, and there was a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it (implied) lesbian couple with a child.

8 Kubo and the Two Strings, Laika

Kubo and the Two Strings finds its story in feudal Japan. You can tell Laika did its research. Though the location of the film is never specified, based on the landscape, Obon (or just Bon) festival, and costumes, we can pin it down to Shikoku. Makes sense, given that Kubo’s mother crosses the ocean to Shikoku in a desperate bid to escape the Moon King. She most likely fled from the mainland.

Kubo draws eyes to a very common, but unknown amongst its target audience, Japanese tradition. Not only does it teach us about the customs and reason of the Bon festival, but uses it as a storytelling vessel with stunning visuals and a tear-jerking lesson in forgiveness and empathy.

7 Big Hero 6, Disney

Big Hero 6 is 5 Stages of Grief narrative disguised as a diet Marvel superhero story. The central conflict revolves around Hiro struggling to come to terms with his brother’s death. Baymax, the squishy healthcare robot, takes the time to not only evaluate Hiro physically but mentally as well. Mental health falls under his healthcare protocols, but Baymax makes the update himself once he realizes what Hiro’s afflicted by. Depression, by the way. It’s depression.

RELATED: 10 Best Avengers: Infinity War Quotes

Not only does Big Hero 6 demonstrate the grieving process, but went out of its way to diversify its cast. Hiro and Tadashi are half-Japanese, Honey Lemon is Hispanic, GoGo is Korean, and Wasabi is black. Sorry Fred, you’re the odd one out here. Also, every character is played by an actor of the same race and/or background.

6 Coco, Pixar

Coco faced some understandable controversy when Disney tried to trademark Day of the Dead, but they didn’t get it and Pixar delivered on a beautiful movie exploring the customs of Dia de los Muertos. From the Riveras’ ofrenda to the stunning depiction of the Land of the Dead, Coco offers a story not of individuality, but of the importance of family and the sacrifices every member makes. It also has one of the best plot twists ever.

The film encapsulates the spirit of Dia de los Muertos wonderfully. When it premiered in Mexico during Dia de los Muertos, Twitter was full of crying and praises. Thankfully, Coco is still on Netflix (including the Spanish version), so go watch it before it moves to Disney+.

5 The Book of Life, Reel FX Creative Studio

Leading up to Hollywood’s bigger push for POC creators, Jorge R. Gutierrez brings us The Book of Life. If you recognize the art style or the name, it’s probably because you watched El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera as a kid. Yep, that was him.

RELATED: 10 Incredible Worlds In The Marvel Comics MCU Has Yet To Explore

Being backed by so many Mexican Americans, The Book of Life definitely delves more into the traditions and folklore of Dia de los Muertos than Coco does and doesn’t really hold our hand through any explanation. If you don’t get the in-jokes, you don’t get them. And that’s ok! But it prompts us to learn more on our own. Also, we’d totally watch an entire movie of Xibalba and La Muerte bickering and being petty. Yes, please.

4 The Breadwinner, Cartoon Saloon

Please note that this movie is PG-13 for thematic elements that go along with telling a story about a family in Afghanistan living under the Taliban in 2001. But it’s an important look at another culture and way of life.

The film does well in not making us pity Parvana. She comes up with the idea to dress as a boy to help her family and, ultimately, gets her father back with the resources and information she’s acquired. As the United States allows itself to talk about Middle Eastern culture, it’s important to remember the citizens, those trying to live their lives to the best of their ability and preserve their way of life. The Breadwinner brings attention to this and hopefully will be one of many more to accurately portray something we’re so far away. The Breadwinner is available to stream on Netflix.

3 Zootopia, Disney

Sure, it’s an entire movie about animals, but it’s one of the best examples of breaking down racism in an understandable way for kids. Some people found it preachy but having it all wrapped up in a buddy-cop story definitely makes the racial themes second and puts the story and characters first.

RELATED: The 10 Craziest Anime Hairstyles

Zootopia also highlights a good life transition in which most of these societal problems become apparent. Many kids from suburbs may see racism for the first time when moving to a city or other area with more diversity in race, income, and sexuality. Also, Judy’s argumentative neighbors are gay. Jared Bush (director and writer on Zootopia) confirmed it on Twitter.

2 Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, Sony Pictures Animation

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse shook up the feature animation world something fierce, reviving the once thought dead form of tradigital animation. Spider-Verse isn’t just a good Spider-Man story, but a beautiful look at NYC through other eyes.

Miles Morales is half-Puerto Rican and half-African American, seamlessly switching between English and Spanish in his household. He offers such a unique take on Spider-Man, given his upbringing in Brooklyn and recent school transfer to the charter school Brooklyn Visions Academy. Though it’s only touched upon in the film, Miles feels out of place in this new school, given how different the environment is compared to the public school he attended. Because of the new spotlight cast on Miles, many kids within the black and Latinx communities found a new interest in Spider-Man and connected to Miles. Seriously, Twitter is full of heartwarming stories and everyone indeed wearing the mask.

1 Lilo & Stitch, Disney

This might come as a surprise given, you know, Spider-Verse. But Lilo & Stitch reigns as number one due to its commitment in portraying the people of Hawaii. If you’re from the USA mainland, we see Hawaii as a state and don’t necessarily understand its history or the type of treatment the indigenous people received as a result to its induction into the country. Other subjects that the movie explores is the foster system and the position social workers are put in, how to take a romantic rejection respectfully (David’s the real MVP), and the concept of found family.

The film has a diverse cast and for the most part, characters are played by actors of the same race. The biggest exception is Daveigh Chase, but given that she around 10 years old at the time of voicing Lilo, we can chalk that up as an actor being right for the part. Also, Jumba and Pleakley, though never officially confirmed, read as a gay couple. At the very least, Pleakley is not straight. Not that gender probably matters much to aliens. But still. Thank you, Pleakley, for telling boys it’s ok to wear wigs and dresses. 

NEXT: 10 Animated Movies We Hope Get The Live-Action Treatment



2019-04-21 03:04:11

Maddy Cohen

2019 Summer Movie Preview – The 20 Films to See

The 2019 summer movie season (that is, May through August) is right around the corner, so we’re counting down the must-see films of the frame. 2019 got off to a realtively slow start, with several movies either disappointing critically and/or struggling to take off at the box office. Fortunately, things started to pick up near the end of February, beginning with How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World and especially Captain Marvel, followed by a handful of hits like Us and Shazam!. And of course, April will end with a massive bang thanks to the release of Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Endgame.

Things shouldn’t slow down much when the proper summer movie season gets underway, either. Indeed, there are even more superhero tentpoles, some major live-action Disney remakes, anticipated animated sequels, and a number of exciting-looking horror films on the immediate horizon. Of course, for those who need a break from genre fare and franchises, there are some equally intriguing indie offerings, biopics, and even a new Quentin Tarantino flick to look forward to. (And before anyone asks: Endgame was on our 2019 Winter/Spring preview, which is why it’s not listed here.)

Related: Every Avengers: Endgame Trailer, TV Spot & Clip

To help narrow things down, we’ve put together a list of 20 Summer 2019 movies to see (along with some honorable mentions, at the end). The films are numbered in the order of their theatrical release date, so feel free to let us know what your personal most anticipated movies are in the comments section!

  • This Page: Pokémon, Titans, Mutants & Will Smith
  • Page 2: Zombies, Evil Dolls, Web-Slingers & The Rock

Plot Summary: In a world where humans and Pokémon live side by side, would-be Pokémon trainer Tim Goodman joins forces with a crime-solving Pikachu to locate his father, a famous detective who’s mysteriously gone missing.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Warner Bros.’ live-action Pokémon movie has gone from being a mild curiosity to one of this summer’s more anticipated (and unique-looking) offerings in recent months. The general public seems to be onboard for Ryan Reynolds’ Who Framed Roger Rabbit-style adventure by this point, with its marketing suggesting that Detective Pikachu is a playful, family-friendly romp that has just enough weirdness to satisfy fans of all things Poke-related. Nostalgia has also played an important role in building hype for the movie, but so far it looks like the strategy shouldn’t blow up in WB’s face like a Psyduck with a headache.

Plot Summary: John Wick finds himself on the run after killing a member of the international assassin’s guild, with hit men and women everywhere hoping to collect the $14 million bounty on his head.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Five years in and John Wick has evolved from a one-off Keanu Reeves action movie to an international franchise with an ever growing fanbase. The fact that John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum is releasing in the summer (rather than the fall or winter, like its predecessors) is a testament to just how popular the series have become since it kicked off. By the look of things, series director Chad Stahelski may’ve been saving the best for last too, with the marketing hyping some genuinely awe-inspiring set pieces, action sequences, and stunts to come in Parabellum proper… assuming this is the last John Wick film, anyway.

Plot Summary: A street urchin named Aladdin is granted three wishes by a magical Genie, after he acquires a magical lamp sought by the scheming Jafar.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Guy Ritchie’s Aladdin is easily the most controversial live-action retelling of a Disney animated classic yet, thanks to everything from the design of Will Smith’s rapping blue Genie to the remake’s problematic casting, white extras being dressed in brownface, and everything in between. At the same time, the original Aladdin is still one of the Mouse House’s biggest (and most beloved) hits of all time, and the odds are good that moviegoers will turn out in large numbers to see this one on the big screen. Whether they’ll actually like what they see, well, that’s something we’re all curious to learn the answer to.

Plot Summary: A small-town couple adopt an alien infant after their pod crash-lands on earth, only for the child to grow up and become a super-powered murderer.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Essentially a horror movie re-imagining of the Superman mythology, Brightburn has attracted interest since before it had a title, thanks to James Gunn’s involvement behind the scenes. The film’s marketing has drawn heavily on the iconography of Man of Steel especially, leaving many to wonder whether Brightburn will feel more like a dark superhero movie or just another evil child thriller (albeit, with a superhero twist). Horror and/or thriller-flavored superhero offerings like Glass and Hellboy have struggled to really connect with either critics or general audiences this year, so it’ll be interesting to see how this one fares by comparison.

Plot Summary: Two best friends, on the eve of their high school graduation, try to cram four years of misbehavior into one wild night.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut made a big splash at SXSW in March, drawing rave reviews and comparisons to raunchy coming of age comedy classics like Superbad (only told from a female perspective). By the sound of it, Booksmart has the potential to be this year’s Blockers and further cement its young stars (Last Man Standing‘s Kaitlyn Dever and Lady Bird‘s Beanie Feldstein) as talents on the rise. With this August’s Good Boys also generating solid buzz following its SXSW debut, Summer 2019 promises to be a pretty good season for R-rated comedies about misbehaving youths and their shenanigans in general.

Plot Summary: The crypto-zoological agency Monarch faces off with a number of god-like monsters, including the infamous Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan, and Godzilla’s ultimate nemesis, King Ghidorah.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: While we’ve still got a year to go before Godzilla and King Kong throw down, this year’s MonsterVerse offering is shaping up to be pretty exciting in its own right. Directed by Michael Dougherty (Krampus), Godzilla: King of the Monsters appears to blend the grounded style of Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla reboot with the brighter colors and more outlandish monster brawls featured in Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ Kong: Skull Island, to overall positive effect. It remains to be seen if the story here is equally up to snuff, but a giant monster movie that syncs well with tunes like “Claire de Lune” and “Over the Rainbow” is definitely doing something right.

Plot Summary: A lonely woman befriends a group of teenagers and lets them party at her house, only for the kids to realize their host is not what she seems.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Blumhouse has become known for producing inventive, original horror movies and/or thrillers in recent years (The Gift, Get Out, Happy Death Day) and that trend looks to continue with their latest project, Ma. The film reunites Octavia Spencer with her The Help director Tate Taylor, and promises to be one of the weirder, wilder thrill rides of the summer, with Spencer leading the way. Some people are even wondering if Ma is a direct rebuttal to the Oscar-winner being type cast as a sassy, but nuturing black supporting character in the early part of her career. Either way, this is one to watch out for.

Plot Summary: The story of Elton John’s life – from his days as a young musical prodigy to his rise to superstardom – is told through the lens of a biopic-meets musical fantasy.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: As far as Hollywood biopics about musicians go, Rocketman looks surprisingly creative. By the sound of it, director Dexter Fletecher and star Taron Egerton (who, yes, is doing his own singing) are more interested in making a movie that captures the spirit of Elton John’s music than a Wikipedia-style docudrama about his life (a la Bohemian Rhapsody). They aren’t shying away from the musician’s legendarily debaucherous lifestyle either, and may even wind up taking home an R rating for their efforts. Here’s hoping that’s the case, anyway, and Rocketman hews closer to something like Velvet Goldmine than a non-comedic version of Walk Hard.

Plot Summary: Jean Grey begins to develop incredible powers that transform her into the dangerous Dark Phoenix, forcing the X-Men to try and either save her… or destroy her.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: The end has come for the X-Men… that is, Fox’s X-Men movies. Yes, it’s been all but confirmed that Dark Phoenix will serve as a conclusion to the studio’s pre-Disney run on the franchise, before the X-Men are rebooted as part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Prior to Disney’s purchase of Fox, however, it sounded like Dark Phoenix was designed to kick-off a whole new trilogy. The film has since gone through reshoots (presumably to change this), but it begs the question: will the new version wrap things up in a satisfying way, or is director Simon Kinberg (who also wrote X-Men: The Last Stand) about to go 0 for 2 on adaptations of The Dark Phoenix Saga?

Plot Summary: A pair of Men in Black agents from the London branch team up to tackle their greatest threat yet: a mole within the MIB organization.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Although it takes place in the same continuity as the original MIB trilogy, Men in Black: International is clearly intended to serve as fresh start for the the comic book-based franchise. It’s a fairly promising continuation too, between Thor: Ragnarok costars Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson playing the leads, and F. Gary Gray (The Fate of the Furious) calling the shots as director. By the look of things, International isn’t trying to reinvent the (MIB) wheel so much as give the property a fresh coat of paint, following a seven year break between films. If things don’t work out, well, you know where the little red button is.

Next Page: Zombies, Evil Dolls, Web-Slingers & The Rock

Plot Summary: Zombies suddenly invade a small town, leaving it to the local cops and residents to try and save the day on their own.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Nobody makes films quite like Jim Jarmusch, and The Dead Don’t Die seems like yet another memorably off-beat and idiosyncratic movie from the Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai and Only Lovers Left Alive director. It also features an all-star cast of actors, including several (Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Chloë Sevigny, Tilda Swinton, and so on) who have collaborated with Jarmusch to great results in the past. Of course, the filmmaker’s projects tend to have pretty niche appeal, and one imagines that won’t change with his quirky zombie horror-comedy. Nevertheless, this has the potential to be one of this summer’s best indie offerings.

Plot Summary: The toys head out on a road trip adventure that shows Woody just how big the world can be for a toy – and leaves him questioning his very purpose.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Continuing the Toy Story movies after Toy Story 3 was always going to be a risky proposition, but Toy Story 4 ended up having to deal with even more challenges than expected during production. However, despite all that, the film is looking rather promising right now, with its trailers serving up a healthy blend of silly toy-related antics and hints of the poignant drama to come. Pixar sequels are typically a step down from their predecessors, but the Toy Story followups have proven to be the exception to that rule so far. Will that trend continue with the fourth (and, for real this time, final) entry? Well, as the marketing’s put it, “God Only Knows”.

Plot Summary: The Warrens place Annabelle in their cursed artifacts room for safe-keeping, only for the possessed doll to awaken the evil spirits that lie within and target their ten-year old daughter, Judy.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: June is going to be a peculiar month for movies about toys “coming to life”, between the release of Annabelle Comes Home, Toy Story 4, and another film we’ll get to later. That aside, the latest Conjuring spinoff has a fun premise, and appears to offer all the jump scares and pale-faced demons going “Boo!” that audiences now expect from (and enjoy about) this franchise. Longtime Conjuring writer-producer Gary Dauberman is making his directorial debut here, so it’ll be interesting to see how he compares to the best helmers that’ve worked on this supernatural horror property so far (especially, David F. Sandberg and series architect James Wan).

Plot Summary: Peter Parker tries to enjoy a relaxing summer vacation in Europe with his friends, but ends up having to save the day when an enigmatic figure named Mysterio shows up.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Marvel Cinematic Universe fans won’t have to wait long for their next fix after Avengers: Endgame, what with Spider-Man: Far From Home arriving two months later. Ant-Man and the Wasp similarly hit theaters a couple months after Avengers: Infinity War in 2018, and provided a welcome change of pace from that massive crossover. Far From Home aims to do the same, but also serves as the first brick in the wall for Phase 4 and a teaser of the MCU’s future to come. Fortunately, it seems that director Jon Watts and his cast have rebottled much of the same heart and humor that they brought to Spider-Man: Homecoming in the sequel.

Plot Summary: A young woman and her boyfriend attend a rare summer festival in Sweden that quickly takes a turn for the horrifying.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Ari Aster’s feature debut, Hereditary, was one of the most talked-about horror films of 2018. Needless to say, cinephiles are curious to see what he’s cooked up for his sophomore feature, Midsommar, especially given its Wicker Man-esque premise and backdrop. Much his like first movie used supernatural horror to examine generational trauma, it appears that Aster’s new offering explores grief and the process of ending a relationship through a story that involves bizarre cults and related violence. Midsommar probably won’t have much more luck crossing over to the mainstream than Hereditary did, but it certainly sounds intriguing.

Plot Summary: Lion cub crown prince Simba prepares to become king of the Pride Lands, unaware that his uncle Scar is plotting to seize the throne for himself.

View Trailer

The BreakdownThe Lion King is one of Disney’s most beloved titles of all time, so it’s little wonder that moviegoers are anticipating the live-action remake with a mix of curiosity, excitement, and trepidation. On the one hand, The Lion King looks like a visual feast and has the makings of a fun “live-action” adventure, with The Jungle Book director Jon Favreau at the helm. On the other hand, the film isn’t exactly promising anything new, and there are many who prefer the vibrant colors of the original 2D animated classic to the toned-down realism of the retelling. That being said: it’s The Lion King, so of course (a lot of) people are going to watch it.

Plot Summary: A former western TV show star and his trusted stunt double navigate the changing times in Los Angeles and Hollywood, circa 1969.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Originally believed to be a film about the Manson murders, Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is really a character piece that takes place against the backdrop of the 1960s. The movie has also been described as a return to the style and format of the writer-director’s breakout work on Pulp Fiction – something the marketing supports, with its emphasis on various players (both fictional and based on real people, like Sharon Tate) as they move in and out of one another’s lives. All in all, this one should provide a welcome break from the summer blockbuster slate, and may even prove to be Tarantino’s best project in years.

Plot Summary: Luke Hobbs and Deckard Shaw are forced to team up and stop a cyber-genetically enhanced international terrorist from wreaking havoc.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Just when you thought the Fast & Furious movies couldn’t get any more ridiculous than The Fate of the Furious… here comes Hobbs & Shaw. The first spinoff in the shockingly durable and evolvable property looks like an over the top cartoon adventure show brought to life in live-action, but in the very best way possible. Of course, it helps to have Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham leading the way and bickering like the married couple that their characters should be, all while beating up bad guys and saving the world as though it’s just another Tuesday. Throw in Idris Elba as “Black Superman” and you’ve got what sounds like perfect popcorn entertainment.

Plot Summary: Boy genius Artemis Fowl – a descendant of a long line of criminal masterminds – engages in a battle with a secret, powerful race of fairies who may be tied to his father’s disappearance.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Disney’s taking yet another stab at launching a new franchise based on popular source material, this time in the form of Artemis Fowl. They’ve recruited Sir Kenneth Branagh (who also helmed the studio’s live-action Cinderella) to call the shots on the project, and so far the results seem promising enough. At the same time, the movie is arriving well after the original books’ heyday during the 2000s, and the Mouse House’s live-action moviemaking approach hasn’t worked so well on non-remakes of late (see: A Wrinkle in Time, The Nutcracker and the Four Realms, etc.). Will Branagh and Disney finally crack the code together?

Plot Summary: A group of teens in a small American town read a mysterious book full of scary stories, and thereafter find themselves being haunted by the stories’ ghouls and monsters.

View Trailer

The Breakdown: Guillermo del Toro and director André Øvredal (The Autopsy of Jane Doe) joined forces to adapt the famous Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark books for the big screen – and so far, the results look as freaky and creepy as you would expect, based on the creatives involved. While this summer isn’t hurting for horror movies intended for adults, it nice to see that teenagers will have something sufficiently spooky to check out too. Fingers crossed, the Scary Stories adaptation will mange to walk the line between being scary fun and pure nightmare fuel the way the original story collections by Alvin Schwartz did.

Long Shot (May 3) – A political rom-com starring Charlize Theron and Seth Rogen? This one’s got pretty strong buzz at the moment, following its premiere at SXSW.

Tolkien (May 10) – This J.R.R. Tolkien biopic looks visually impressive so far – but will it prove anywhere near as memorable as the stories that the author actually wrote?

The Secret Life of Pets 2 (June 7) – Illumination’s sequel seems a bit thin when it comes to plot, but promises to deliver more than its fair share of pet-related misdeeds.

Child’s Play (June 21) – Longtime fans remain wary of this remake’s technophobic spin on the ’80s slasher classic – but hey, Mark Hamill as Chucky sounds creepy so far.

The Kitchen (August 9) – Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish, and Elizabeth Moss as mob wives-turned mob bosses? This comic book adaptation definitely has potential.

Ad Astra (May 24) and The New Mutants (August 2) – Yes, these two are still technically scheduled to arrive this summer, but we’ll believe it when we see it.

NEXT: Lion King Will Be Disney’s Biggest 2019 Movie, Not Endgame


2019-04-20 05:04:45

Sandy Schaefer

7 Films That You Didn’t Know Are Part Of The Ridley Scott Universe

Ridley Scott is a name you know even if you don’t watch movies. Scott’s extensive body of work that includes more than twenty Hollywood films. He is also an active producer.

Leaving out the Alien and Bladerunner franchises, which seem to suck all the air out of this room before the conversation even gets started, what movies are the best to watch to get an idea of Ridley Scott’s impressive range?

The following movies are when Ridley Scott tells us a story with the same triumphant themes and epic storylines that made him famous. This is an eclectic list that includes historical dramas, fairy tales and documentaries. And there isn’t an Alien or replicant in sight.

In the end, the conflict always comes from within.

RELATED: Ridley Scott Says He’s ‘Too Dangerous’ to Direct Star Wars

7 The Duelists (1977)

It wasn’t science fiction or a thriller that brought Ridley Scott into the spotlight. The Duellists is a historical drama set in Napolean-era France and won the Best Debut Film at the Cannes Film Festival in 1977. Few peoples outside of Cannes know Ridley Scott had anything to do with it.

It might not take place in space, but the setting is just as dangerous. This is a journey that follows the violent and bloody obsession of two men as their lives take them from war to war. For 15 years, they fight an ongoing duel with the chaos of 19th-century Europe in the background.

It’s an epic tale, winning accolades for historic accuracy and brilliant direction. Scott would give us similar historic settings in the future like Kingdom of Heaven and Robin Hood. 

6 Legend (1985)

Every so often we get a fantasy movie that’s intended for adults but ends up beings marketed to kids. Most people stumbled across this film in their childhood somewhere between The Neverending Story and The Dark Crystal. The result is box office failure and obscurity, and thus we have Legend. 

The script went through numerous rewrites and there are currently four versions of the film, with the Director’s Cut being the most recent in 2002.

RELATED: 20 Crazy Details Behind the Making of Legend

As one of Tom Cruise and Ridley’s Scott’s earliest big-budget films, with other stars like Tim Rice holding up the cast, this movie does have some merit and enjoys a cult following.

5 White Squall (1996)

Survivalism is a popular genre and Ridley Scott likes to pit his characters against ridiculous odds. That doesn’t necessarily mean man versus nature in this film, either. Some of the most intense drama takes place when the students have to confront issues with each other or family members. Training sequences are just as tense as the heroic actions that take place during the actual storm.

A lot of White Squall is based on a true story about a student sailing trip gone wrong in the 1960s. This was yet another movie that critics liked but failed at the box office. People liked the action sequences but cringed at the sappy dialogue.

Without the direction of Ridley Scott and a strong performance from Jeff Bridges this movie really would have sunk.

4 G.I. Jane (1997)

This movie was ahead of its time when it came to the subject of women breaking into a man’s world. It’s also an excellent example of smart marketing, image control and why Demi Moore was so popular. Viggo Martensen also plays a part.

G. I. Jane had a lot going for it as far as themes and characters. Other than that, it isn’t one of Scott’s more celebrated outings.

RELATED: 10 Best Training Montages in Movies

The actual storyline is rather forgettable, following a pattern that only a studio or test audience would love. Critics hated it for all the right reasons. Audiences loved it for all the wrong reasons.

3 Tristan and Isolde (2006)

Those that pay attention to Ridley Scott’s peripheral work won’t be surprised at how often myth and legend appear in his projects. Legend was based on a Celtic myth and Scott made a Robin Hood movie with Russell Crowe (although apparently not the movie he really wanted to make).

Scott isn’t behind the camera this time. His role in the making of Tristan and Isolde was as executive producer and he’s been open about working on adaptations for the story since the 1970s. Considering his interest in Celtic mythology, his involvement isn’t that surprising.

RELATED: Ridley Scott’s Merlin Saga Eyes Fall Start Date, Gets Character Breakdowns

The film was directed by Kevin Reynolds and was the last movie distributed by the now bankrupt Franchise Pictures.

2 The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)

This is one of those historical dramas that is loved by critics and underrated by the public, much like the equally obscure The Duellists. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is also about murderous intent and the personal conflict that arises between two people.

Even though Ridley produced this film as opposed to directing it, the actual director Andrew Dominik uses the same epic style. The train robbery at night scene is an amazing example of Roger Deakin’s cinematography talents. Dominik would team up with Brad Pitt later to make Killing Them Softly in 2012.

Yet another compelling period drama to add to Scott’s impressive resume.

1 Life in a Day (2011)

A unique documentary that was made in an unconventional format, Life in a Day is a compilation of crowdsourced YouTube videos arranged in a documentary format and released by National Geographic Films.

Over 80,000 different clips were used from a wide range of content creators and uploaders to make the movie. The videos all focus on a specific day, July 24th, 2010, the first Saturday after the World Cup.

This is also an instance where Ridley is an executive producer as opposed to the director. He also worked on editing the videos that were submitted as part of the initial compilation.

It’s an interesting twist that a director with so much talent would invest in a movie that doesn’t need him – and might signify the future of film.

NEXT: 10 Unrealized Ridley Scott Projects We Want to See


2019-04-20 01:04:49

Kristy Ambrose

All 30 Upcoming & In-Development DC Films

Warner Bros. Pictures is hard at work on several DC Comics-based movies, both in live-action and animation. While the vast majority of live-action DC films remain part of the ongoing DC Extended Universe (DCEU), which launched with Zack Snyder’s Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice in 2016 (a follow-up to 2013’s Man of Steel), a handful of upcoming DC films are going to be standalone. Those are going to release as part of WB’s currently-untitled banner that resembles DC Comics’ Elseworlds stories.

Over the past few years, WB has released sevenDC Comics-related movies – Man of Steel, Batman V Superman, Suicide Squad, Wonder Woman, Justice League, Aquaman and, most recently, Shazam! – and the critical and commercial reception has ranged from being overwhelmingly negative to overwhelmingly positive, with a few handing in the middle. But things are changing going forward.

Related: Wonder Woman 1984 May Break DCEU Sequel Tradition (& Change Its Future)

IT producer Walter Hamada will be overseeing DC Films alongside Chantal Nong as VP of DC production, and their purview extends to all corners of the DC universe on the big screen. And it looks like they have their work cut out for them. In total, there are more than two dozen DC Comics-based movies in various stages in development (including several movies that are on the official DCEU slate and some that aren’t), with only a select few slated either to release or go into production within the next few years.

  • This Page: Every Movie On Warner Bros.’ Official DC Slate
  • Page 2: DCEU Movies In Active Development
  • Page 3: Every Other DC Movie In Development

Last updated: April 19, 2019

Directed by Todd Phillips (The Hangover), Joker is technically not part of the DCEU, but is instead a standalone movie set in the 1980s, with Joaquin Phoenix playing the Clown Prince of Crime. Executive produced by Martin Scorsese and inspired by Scorsese’s 1982 satirical film The King of Comedy, Joker will serve as an imagined origin story for Batman’s greatest nemesis, though Bruce Wayne himself is just a child (played by Dante Pereira-Olson). Set photos and behind-the-scenes images from Phillips have shown Phoenix wearing a red suit, green hair, and traditional clown make-up, and seemingly inciting riots in Gotham City.

Read More: Joker Origin Movie: Every Update You Need To Know

Margot Robbie’s Harley Quinn will return in Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn), a team superhero movie with a very long title, directed by Cathy Yan and written by Christina Hodson. Birds of Prey will also star Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Huntress, Rosie Perez as Detective Renee Montoya, and Jurnee Smollett-Bell as Black Canary. Ella Jay Basco will play the young Cassandra Cain, and Ewan McGregor will play the movie’s villain, Black Mask.

Read More: Birds of Prey Movie: Every Update You Need To Know

After first appearing in Batman v Superman, Gal Gadot reprised her role as Diana Prince/Wonder Woman in Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman film in 2017, which became an astounding critical and commercial success. So, of course, Warner Bros. decided to fast-track a sequel. Jenkins returns to direct the sequel based on a script from David Callaham (Godzilla, The Expendables) and a story Jenkins co-wrote with Geoff Johns. Wonder Woman 1984 (as you can tell from the title) takes place in the 1980s, during the final days of the Cold War, with Kristen Wiig playing the titular villain, Dr. Barbara Minerva/Cheetah.

Read More: Wonder Woman 1984: Every Update You Need To Know

Moving into 2021, the first dated movie is DC’s Super Pets on May 21. An animated movie from Jared Stern (writer of The LEGO Batman Movie) and thus a more family-focused film than many on the slate, Super Pets will presumably follow Krypto the Superdog, Ace the Bat-Hound and the various other animal sidekicks of Justice League members (likely with an all-star cast).

While this will be an animated film and not a part of the DCEU main narrative, it’s still a key DC release and represents the diversification of the DC Films output going forward.

Ben Affleck originally signed on to write and direct The Batman – a standalone Batman movie film set within the DCEU – in addition to reprising his role as Bruce Wayne/Batman. In 2017, however, Affleck chose to remove himself from a creative role. And now, Affleck has officially exited the DCEU; Warner Bros. is looking for a younger actor to replace him as Batman. Cloverfield and Planet of the Apes director Matt Reeves ended up replacing Affleck as writer-director, though. Reeves threw out the story that Affleck and Geoff Johns co-wrote for the movie and started the script from scratch. Although Reeves is only confirmed to direct The Batman, he’s also reportedly looking at creating a new Batman trilogy of his own.

Read More: The Batman: Every Update You Need to Know

David Ayer’s Suicide Squad was the first movie that truly expanded the DCEU beyond the core heroes, but it wasn’t the critical success that WB or audiences expected it would be based on its impressive marketing campaign. Still, the film was an enormous commercial success, so the studio is planning on releasing a sequel, Suicide Squad 2. After Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn was fired by Marvel Studios, Warner Bros. wasted little time in recruiting him to write and direct Suicide Squad 2. In addition to bringing his Guardians of the Galaxy thought process to Suicide Squad 2, the sequel is currently titled The Suicide Squad and it will feature and all-new cast. While it’s possible Margot Robbie will reprise her role as Harley Quinn in The Suicide Squad, it was recently confirmed that Will Smith won’t be appearing as Deadshoot due to a scheduling conflict, with The Suicide Squad aiming to begin production in September 2019.

Read More: Suicide Squad 2: Every Update You Need To Know

One of the latest DC movies to be put into development is Aquaman 2, which comes on the heels of James Wan’s Aquaman earning more than $1.14 billion at the worldwide box office. Aquaman 2 is currently being written by David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick, who co-wrote the first movie; Wan will return as a producer, though there’s no word on if he’s directing the sequel yet. Peter Safran is also returning to produce. While it hasn’t been announced, Jason Momoa will undoubtedly return as Arthur Curry aka Aquaman in Aquaman 2, as should Amber Heard as Mera.

Page 2 of 3: DCEU Movies In Active Development

The Flash solo movie was originally slated to release in March 2018, but it was removed from the schedule following Seth Grahame-Smith and Rick Famuyiwa’s separate departures as directors in 2016. Directing duo Jonathan Goldstein and John Francis Daley (Game Night, Spider-Man: Homecoming) later signed on to helm the film based on a script from Joby Harold (King Arthur). Due to various delays, the Flash movie is not expected to begin filming until late 2019 at the very earliest, and will not be released until at least 2021. Barry Allen actor Ezra Miller reassured fans that the movie is definitely still coming, saying, “Nothing is ever certain in this world, but as certain as things get, we’re making a f****** crazy-dope Flash movie.”

Read More: The Flash Movie: Every Update You Need to Know

Warner Bros. originally attempted to launch a cinematic universe with Martin Campbell’s Green Lantern in 2011, starring Ryan Reynolds. The film was a critical and commercial failure, which is why DC is looking to reboot the film (and team) within the DCEU with Green Lantern Corps. Geoff Johns, who wrote a nine-year run of Green Lantern comics, will write and produce the movie. Mission: Impossible – Fallout director Christopher McQuarrie was rumored to be Warner Bros.’ favorite choice to direct, and McQuarrie has said he is open to coming onboard for the right story, but no one’s officially attached to direct right now. While the film was originally given a July 2020 release date, it’s no longer slated to release on that date.

Related: Green Lantern Corps: Every Update On The New Movie

One of the strangest (read: unknown to the general public) properties that Warner Bros. is trying to get off the ground is Justice League Dark, based on the comic book team of the same name that protects the world from magical and supernatural forces. Guillermo del Toro and Doug Liman were both previously attached to direct the film, which was once titled Dark UniverseJustice League Dark may not be getting the most attention at the moment, but it’s something that WB is actively trying to get made.

Related: Justice League Dark Movie May Include the Shadowpact Team

A Batgirl movie wasn’t on Warner Bros.’ DCEU slate until former Avengers director Joss Whedon talked to the studio about wanting to make that film. Whedon reportedly wanted to adapt The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!, but he simply couldn’t make it work, so he exited the project as both writer and director in February 2018 – almost one year after signing on for the film. Warner Bros. is looking for a female director to replace Whedon. Christina Hodson, the screenwriter behind Birds of Prey, is also penning the script for Batgirl.

Page 3 of 3: Every Other DC Movie In Development

In addition to all the movies on Warner Bros.’ official DCEU slate, there are at least a dozen other projects in various stages of development, some of which are connected to the DCEU and some that aren’t. The LEGO Batman Movie director Chris McKay is directing Nightwing based on a story and script from Bill Dubuque (Ozark). However, that film may not release for several more years since McKay was recently hired to direct Dungeons & Dragons for Paramount Pictures (which is due out in theaters in 2021). There’s also a Supergirl movie in development, from 22 Jump Street writer Oren Uziel.

Instead of returning to helm Suicide Squad 2, David Ayer might be adapting Gotham City Sirens from a script by Geneva Dworet-Robertson (Tomb Raider, Captain Marvel). That’s just one of several projects that Margot Robbie has in development for Harley Quinn. Robbie will also potentially reprise her role in Glenn Ficarra & John Requa’s (Crazy, Stupid, Love) Harley Quinn & The Joker and an Untitled Harley Quinn movie – but there’s no guarantee that either project will be given the green light. There’s also a long-dormant Cyborg movie starring Ray Fisher that is supposedly still happening.

Related: Ava DuVernay’s New Gods Movie Might NOT Be In The DCEU

Meanwhile, Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson will be making his debut as Teth-Adam in Black Adam, based on a script from his longtime collaborator Adam Sztykiel (Rampage). As for Lobo, Wonder Woman scribe Jason Fuchs is rewriting the screenplay, with Warner Bros. eyeing Michael Bay (Transformers) to direct. Finally, Warner Bros. is reportedly developing Justice League 2 and Man of Steel 2, though those two have basically been put on ice for now. Moreover, the studio also commissioned a New Gods movie from Ava DuVernay (Selma, A Wrinkle in Time), though the film may not be part of the DCEU. Plus, there’s the Booster Gold movie from Arrowverse co-creator Greg Berlanti that has been in development for several years, and a Blackhawk movie that will be produced and possibly directed by Steven Spielberg.

Given Aquaman‘s success and extensive world-building, an Aquaman spinoff called The Trench (about the Trench) is currently being developed by WB, which would cost considerably less than a tentpole movie and delve more into horror. If it happens, Wan has promised that it won’t affect other mainline DC films in development. This is evident by Aquaman 2 already being dated by WB.

Along with Warner Bros.’ live-action DC films, Warner Bros. Animation also has quite a few DC-based projects in development. The first to release is Justice League vs. The Fatal Five, arriving in spring 2019, followed by Batman: Hush in summer 2019, which will offer a “gauntlet of Batman villains including Poison Ivy, Ra’s al Ghul, the Joker, and, of course, the bandage-faced mystery villain Hush.” The final animated movie being planned for 2019 is Wonder Woman: Bloodlines, though we don’t yet have a more specific release window. Furthermore, WB Animation also reportedly has animated movies for Superman: Red Son and Batman Beyond in development. However, it’s unclear when those movies would release.

More: How to Watch Every DCEU Movie Online


2019-04-19 03:04:31

Mansoor Mithaiwala