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Grandma Beats Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess in 750 Hours

A grandmother has finally defeated Zant and Ganondorf in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess after a little over 750 hours. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was released in 2006 and instantly became a seminal title for the Nintendo Wii. It stands at third for most critical acclaim for a Zelda title, just behind Orcarina of Time and the most recent game, Breath of the Wild. Like all of Link’s adventures, many are still playing and talking about it, today.

This isn’t the first time that someone’s grandma has found her way into gaming. 82-year-old YouTuber Shirley Curry made headlines in 2016 after one of her videos playing Skyrim went viral. Even after beating the main quest, Shirley continued to explore the different areas and dungeons, of which Skyrim has plenty. She always broadcasted her travels in the land of the Nords, but her channel got a significant boost when she became famous on the internet. At some point, even Skyrim developer Bethesda took notice and has confirmed that Shirley’s likeness will be used for an NPC in The Elder Scrolls VI.

Related: Zelda: Breath of the Wild Climbing Gear Location Guide

According to Digital Trends, another longtime gaming grandma is getting some attention. Reddit user millerischris (whose real name is Chris), shared the story and revealed that it took his grandmother 755 hours to save Hyrule and Midna, the Twilight Princess. Chris bought a Wii and The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess for her 11 years ago, and she has finally wrapped her journey up, clocking in at 754 hours and 31 minutes. “I would help with the occasional challenge or two when she asked,” Chris said, “but she did 99% of the work, including the final fight!” Nintendo even sent her a physical map to help her beat the game.

Chris said that his grandmother has always loved puzzles and Zelda, dating all the back to the original NES. He also confirmed that once she starts a puzzle, she finishes it. After his post began to gain traction, Chris’ grandmother created her own Reddit account, GramieGreat, and started answering questions. She revealed that Snowpeak and City in the Sky were her favorite areas, and that she still plans on going back to finish the Trial of Ordeals. “Had a couple years when I didn’t touch this,” she wrote, “but it was always there waiting for me.” She continued to go back over the years and eventually beat the game.

It will be interesting to see how many more grandparents are willing to share their gaming stories as time goes on. Many people who played games as adults in the 80’s and 90’s are getting older and continuing their hobby in their later years. Some may even pick up gaming after retirement as a stimulating way to pass time. RPG puzzles can keep wits sharp and platformers are a great way to stretch out reflexes. Stories like Shirley’s and GramieGreat’s are great ways to bring communities together and show that different people from all walks of life enjoy solving puzzles and saving the princess.

Next: Link’s Awakening Remake Could Spawn Zelda Maker

Source: Reddit, Digital Trends


2019-07-13 01:07:13

David Brown

WandaVision Disney+ TV Show Starts Filming Fall 2019, Will Be 6 Hours Long

Elizabeth Olsen says that Marvel’s Scarlet Witch and Vision Disney+ series, WandaVision, will begin filming this fall and should run about six hours long. After years of comic book stories about the pair as a romantic couple, Wanda Maximoff and Vision finally paired up on the big screen in last year’s Marvel Cinematic Universe film, Avengers: Infinity War. Their happiness was short-lived, however, after Thanos made his way to earth and promptly ripped the Mind Stone from Vision’s head (killing him instantly), before then using his Infinity Gauntlet to snap half of all life in the universe out of existence, Wanda included.

Thankfully, it looks like the surviving MCU superheroes will find a way to reverse all that in this week’s Infinity War followup, Avengers: Endgame. Marvel Studios has only officially announced one more movie after Endgame (this summer’s Spider-Man: Far From Home), but is known to be working on several films for Phase 4 of the MCU. It’s also developing a handful of MCU TV series for the Disney+ streaming service, ahead of its launch this year on November 12.

Related: Every Original Movie & TV Show Coming to Disney+

Among the MCU Disney+ series that’ve been confirmed so far are a show about Falcon and Winter Soldier, as well as a series about Loki and a show following Wanda and Vision titled WandaVision. Olsen, who plays Scarlet Witch in the MCU, was at the Endgame premiere earlier this week and told Variety that filming on WandaVision is currently slated to begin this fall. She later revealed that the show will span about six hours (or eight forty-five minute episodes) overall, in keeping with previous reports on the matter.

Olsen also referenced to the series’ “great group of writers”, which includes Jac Schaeffer as the show’s main producer and pilot writer. The latter has quickly made a name for herself at Disney, having written the Frozen short Olaf’s Frozen Adventure and co-written the upcoming Black Widow solo movie that Scarlett Johansson is headlining. Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige has further confirmed that the Marvel Disney + series will intersect with future MCU movies, as part of a larger shift in storytelling that Marvel plans to start embracing in Phase 4 and beyond.

Between all that and Olsen and Paul Bettany reprising their respective roles as Wanda and Vision, the WandaVision series is shaping up to feel like a proper continuation of the overarching MCU narrative. The show will also have better production values than some of the other MCU TV series have in the past, to the degree that it should look and feel pretty cinematic. As for what the future holds for those crazy kids… well, everyone will just have to wait and see what happens in Endgame, and how – if at all – it sets the stage for WandaVision‘s storyline.

NEXT: Everything You Need to Know About Disney+

Source: Variety



2019-04-24 02:04:05

Sandy Schaefer

16 Video Games That Take More Than 50 Hours To Beat That Are Worth It (And 9 That Aren’t)

Time is money, with every wasted moment is akin to setting dollar bills on fire. Most avid gamers would love nothing more than to sit on their couch or in front of their computer, spending two thirds of the day in their favorite fantasy world, but that usually isn’t feasible. Because everyday life takes priority over leisure time, people have to be careful which games they choose to play.

Deciding which title to dive into can be especially stressful when the the games are enormous. If it is a stellar title, then every second feels well spent. Should the game be lackluster, though, then players will find themselves simply going through the motions, reaching the end only to convince themselves that the whole thing wasn’t in vain.

For this reason we have compiled a list of games that take dozens of hours to complete, classified by whether or not they are worth the time to do so. It should be noted that some of the entries are more open ended, meaning they can be completed in a relatively short amount of time if desired, but diving into the real meat of the content will still fill up the hours. Additionally, games deemed unworthy are not necessarily bad, but may not be compelling enough to warrant several days of gaming.

So clear your schedules, because here are the 16 Video Games That Take More Than 50 Hours To Beat That Are Worth It (And 9 That Aren’t).

25 Worth It: The Witcher 3

The first two games set in Andrzej Sapkowski’s mature fantasy world were revered by critics and fans, but they were still niche products. The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt blew the lid off of the whole franchise, exposing the fleshed out universe to a whole new legion of fans.

Unlike most open world fantasy games, the player character is well defined, leaving little room for aesthetic customization. Despite this, player choice still factors greatly into the plot and interactions. Geralt of Rivia has a hard shelled exterior, but the driving force of his mission is the parental bond he has with Ciri.

24 Worth It: Grand Theft Auto V

Rockstar outdoes itself with each game it delivers. Red Dead Redemption 2 is currently feeding gamers’ hunger for engrossing, living sandboxes, but Grand Theft Auto V should not be forgotten so soon.

The game holds around seventy story missions. This is about twenty less than its predecessor, but there is no filler to be found; each one is an memorable event. Besides those, there are a plethora of side missions and an expansive multiplayer mode that has taken on a life of its own. GTA VI probably won’t be around anytime soon, but V has yet to grow stale, and it probably never will.

23 Not Worth It: Metal Gear Solid V

It’s hard to discourage players from picking up this title, since what is there of it is one of the greatest action games in recent memory. The precise problem lays in the words “what is there of it.” Due to a well publicized falling out between Kojima Productions and the publisher, Konami, The Phantom Pain was released in a painfully unfinished state.

The game still works, but there comes a point in the story where everything falls apart and it beelines to a finish, leaving vital questions unanswered. It’s better to acknowledge Metal Gear Solid 4 as the true finale, and everything else afterwards as a bonus.

22 Worth It: Breath Of The Wild

The premiere Legend of Zelda title wowed NES (or Famicom) owners with its emphasis on exploration and discovery. Ocarina of Time managed to recapture this feeling, but no other entry had done so until 2017’s Breath of the Wild.

The voice of a distressed Princess Zelda wakes a slumbering Link and — after a short tutorial in the immediate surrounding location — the world is open up for discovery. The open ended design does not sacrifice plot, as the cinematics are more beautiful than ever. Traversing every inch of the ruined Hyrule takes countless hours, and every moment is pure bliss.

21 Worth It: Final Fantasy XII

The Final Fantasy series has a stellar track record, with few of its numbered entries being considered anything less than phenomenal. Several Final Fantasys could have been on this list, but XII gets the mention because of its especially grand scope.

Tackling the main story without any side quests takes longer than most RPGs, but why would anyone want to ignore the bonus activities? Ivalice had been utilized a few times before, in games like Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story, but never had it felt so real and bustling with life.

20 Not Worth It: Final Fantasy XIV Before A Realm Reborn

Hubris is a bad characteristic to have, and it all too easily latches itself onto successful people. Square-Enix was still riding high off of Final Fantasy XI’s success when XIV was released in 2010. The new MMO felt outdated, frustrating to navigate, and like a slap in the face to fans.

Fortunately, this story has a happy ending. Square made the wise decision to completely redesign the game, eventually relaunching it in 2013 as A Ream Reborn. The original build is now impossible to access, and the company has regained the MMO community’s trust.

19 Worth It: Skyrim

This game is often associated with the joke about porting it to every console imaginable. It is a funny bit of droll, but bringing it to as many gamers as possible is a noble mission, because everyone deserves the opportunity to experience The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim for themselves.

Certain elements are streamlined from previous entries, but the core tenants that make an Elder Scrolls game are still present and more engaging than they have ever been. The title is seven years old, but traversing through the rural region of Skyrim is still a blast.

18 Worth It: Any Of The Yakuza Games

One shouldn’t expect a realistic representation of the notorious crime syndicate from this series, but they will find soap opera-esque melodrama and over the top melee combat. The entire series spans several decades, and follows a core group of characters.

The older titles have not aged graciously, but Sega has been generous enough to remake first two games, making them smoother experiences for modern times. With these remakes, it is easier than ever for newcomers to jump into the series and see what fans have been fawning over for all of these years.

17 Not Worth It: Elder Scrolls II

The older Elder Scrolls games paved the way for what would later become one of the industries’ most venerated franchises, but diving into them now takes the patience of a saint and the free time of a pensioner. Modern conveniences are absent, and bugs are heavily prevalent.

The upside is that should players learn to grasp the outdated controls and obsolete mechanics, there is a breathlessly expansive world to be explored. Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall and its predecessor are worth picking up as curiosities, but will compel few to complete them these days.

16 Worth It: Fallout New Vegas

Both Fallout titles from the last generation of consoles hold up to this day, even if their graphical presentation leaves something to be desired. New Vegas gets a special mention because of its faithfulness to the original two titles, due to Chris Avallone’s involvement.

The spin off title also differs itself Bethesda’s efforts in the series because of its emphasis on player choice effecting the world. Gamers interested in picking it up should play the PC or 360 version, though, as the PS3 release is still wrought with bugs and crashes.

15 Worth It: Mass Effect 2

Some may argue that playing through the Mass Effect trilogy is not a worthwhile endeavor, as its ending left a sour taste in everyone’s mouthes. It is true that the conclusion is disappointing even with its patched amendments, but games, like life, are more than just about the destination. The journey to the finale is more rewarding than the final moments before the credits roll.

Playing through the trilogy leads to countless special moments and unforgettable encounters. A mediocre ending is only a small blight that does little to tarnish the overall saga.

14 Not Worth It: Fallout 4

Fallout 4 is a not a bad game by any stretch of the word, and anybody who plays it is sure to have fun. However, the changes it made to the classic Fallout formula proved too much for some veteran fans. Player choice is no longer at the forefront, with an increased significance placed on collecting loot and exploring dungeons.

Admittedly, the game runs out of gas before the majority of the side quests can be completed. The DLC offerings also fail to live up to the prior entries’ unique expansions.

13 Worth It: Legend Of Dragoon

The PS1 ushered in something of a golden age for RPGs from Japan. Almost everyone fondly recalls the console’s Final Fantasy titles, but a few gems are less remembered by younger generations, like Xenogears, Legend of Legaia, and The Legend of Dragoon.

Legend of Dragoon was an expensive undertaking at the time, and fortunately did manage to make back its budget in sales. Playing it today proves that the mechanics and story have stood the test of time. Anyone interested in visiting this old classic is in luck, as it is available on the Playstation Store as a PS1 Classic.

12 Worth It: Red Dead Redemption 2

It’s barely been out over a month, and Red Dead Redemption 2 is already being hailed as one of the greatest games of all time. Much like true love, sometimes people don’t need time; they know it when they see it. This epic tale of the fading outlaw lifestyle provides spine tingling story moments and heart pounding firefights.

When not progressing through the story, there are a wealth of bonus activities and side quests to undertake. Even the most mundane of these remains interesting, as they are usually accompanied with well written dialogue that allows the player to learn more about Arthur Morgan and the rest of Dutch van der Linde’s gang.

11 Not Worth It: Final Fantasy XIII

For those who know what they are getting into, Final Fantasy XIII is a fun ride. Unfortunately, the thirteenth title sparked the ire of many fans with its linear design that removed even the slightest illusion of freedom.

Time has only made the game less intriguing to play. Two sequels were released, creating an entire Final Fantasy XIII trilogy. Sadly, though, they don’t live up to the original’s quality, and the plot takes ridiculous twists. One game with a concrete ending would have been enough, but knowing there are two more afterwards makes the first one less appealing these days.

10 Worth It: Dragon Age

Bioware didn’t forget about fantasy fans when it released the epic space opera, Mass Effect, in 2007. Two years later saw Dragon Age: Origins hit store shelves, marking the beginning of another classic franchise. Those familiar with the developer were more comfortable with the setting, which hearkened back to its earlier Boulder’s Gate and Neverwinter Nights days.

The latest entry was 2014’s Dragon Age: Inquisition. The franchise’s future is uncertain, but here’s hoping the company commences work on a new entry after Anthem comes out. Perhaps they have already started development in secret.

9 Worth It: Xenosaga

Tetsuya Takahashi worked on numerous legendary titles, including several Final Fantasy games and Chrono Trigger. Younger gamers will most likely recognize the name from the well regarded Xenoblade Chronicles series. Those are from the first of his titles to bear “Xeno” in their titles, however.

Playstation One has Xenogears, and the PS2 has the Xenosaga trilogy. All four of these titles are immaculately crafted narrative driven RPGs. These intensely dramatic games stand out from the crowd by focusing on science fiction settings and themes, instead of the comfortable fantasy tropes expected from the genre.

8 Not Worth It: Fallout 76

No one is surprised that Bethesda has released another glitch ridden product, but the amount of bugs that populate Fallout 76 is truly surprising. What’s worse, though, is the fact that the game itself is not that fun even if one can look past all of the crashes, frame rate drops, and connection issues. The developer is working on fixing the issues plaguing the multiplayer game, but it is best to stay away from it for now.

On the bright side, there are still four incredible mainline entries and a fantastic spin off, more than enough content to keep players occupied until the next 76 patch comes out.

7 Worth It: Persona

The more than twenty year old Persona series is itself a spinoff of Megami Tensei, an older Atlus franchise. Right from the get-go, it is clear that the games are for a niche audience, but this also means that one will never find a similar experience like the one offered by Persona.

Praise can be sung all day about the battle systems and dungeon, but the slices of every day life in between are what really make the series so unique. The older games may have some obsolete mechanics incongruous to modern sensibilities, but the series as a whole is a worthwhile endeavor.

6 Not Worth It: APB Reloaded

Those familiar with MMOs probably already know to steer clear of this one. The original APB had been in development for half a decade before launching half baked. A quick glance at the game reveals a product that looks incomplete.

The servers shut down several months later and the game was heavily reworked into it’s Reloaded version. Now it is free to play and on consoles. However, despite being free and sporting an impressive breadth of content, none of it is entertaining. There are better MMO’s out there, and certainly better open world games in urban settings.

5 Worth It: Dark Souls

A common complaint about modern games is there lack of difficulty. the eight bit era was absolutely unforgiving, and people still want a title that pushes the limits of their skills. For those with such desires, nothing will scratch that itch better than the Dark Souls series.

The games are brutal, but never feel completely unfair. The feeling of finally besting a challenging foe is indescribable, and best discovered by people on their own. FromSoftware has several other incredible titles of a similar ilk, such as Demon’s Soul and Bloodborne.

4 Not Worth It: No Man’s Sky

Hello Games billed their ambitious title as the space exploration game to end all space exploration games. The final product did essentially live up to all of its promises, but these promises were not conducive to a fulfilling adventure. The universe was endlessly vast, but most of the time spent there consisted of gathering supplies.

Fortunately, the developer has been tweaking and enhancing No Man’s Sky ever since its release, consistently building upon the foundation. These days it is a blast to play, but some players have a hard time forgiving its shaky start.

3 Worth It: Monster Hunter: World

Every Monster Hunter title is a time sink not only due to the massive world, but also because carousing through menus takes up half the play time. Monster Hunter: World still feels like a true Monster Hunter experience, but perfects the formula, making it accessible to anybody interested in the long running series.

Players who devoured the on disc content always have a reason to come back. Capcom regularly adds free updates with new monsters to slay. On top of all this, Monster Hunter: World is a gorgeous game to look at.

2 Not Worth It: Mass Effect: Andromeda

The Mass Effect series is yearning for the days when its third game’s conclusion was the biggest gripe fans had. The next game in the franchise was hotly anticipated and expected to mark the beginning of a new trilogy. Instead, its myriad of glitches and curious design choices have potentially ended the once beloved science fiction series.

Andromeda was not intended to be a bad game, but lack of resources and using the Frostbite engine proved troublesome for production. Patches have since remedied some issues, but most still recommended to keep away from the title.

1 Worth It: Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together

Before Final Fantasy Tactics, there was Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together. This cult classic distinguishes itself from the crowd by having a fantasy plot devoid of supernatural elements, except for the use of magic in battle.

Tactics Ogre originally came out on the SNES, but has since been ported to the Playstation, Sega Saturn, and PSP. The PSP is the ideal version, and can be played on a PS Vita as well, making it possible to experience the brutality and moral ambiguity of war on a bus or train.

What are your favorite lengthy video games? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-12-05 01:12:26

Assassin’s Creed: 20 Things Only Experts Know How To Do In Odyssey

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey – the latest installment in Ubisoft’s wildly popular video game franchise – has finally landed on shelves. Set in Ancient Greece, Odyssey gives players the opportunity to assume the role of a mercenary from either Athens or Sparta, and to take part in a mythology-infused recreation of the Peloponnesian War.

The game features an even greater emphasis on the RPG elements first introduced in its predecessor, Assassin’s Creed Origins, and boasts multiple endings that are triggered by the player’s actions. Odyssey also sees the return of the controversial Hitbox combat engine which debuted in Origins – albeit in a significantly enhanced form. Thanks to these and other challenging core mechanics – not to mention the daunting size of the game’s virtual environment – Odyssey should prove suitably tough for more casual gamers. But for seasoned veterans of the Assassin’s Creed franchise? Not so much.

Indeed, gamers who have followed the series since the very first entry way back in 2007 aren’t likely to struggle. On the contrary, we expect them to flourish, putting to good use the skills and knowledge they’ve gleaned from the past 11 games in the series – not to mention the six spin-off entries – to finish the main quest in record time.  This will leave them free to start focusing on tracking down Odyssey’s hidden Easter eggs, secret areas, and other bonus content clueless rookies don’t have a chance of tracking down unaided.

Here’s a list of 20 Things Only Experts Know How To Do In Assassin’s Creed Odyssey.

20 Find The Legend Of Zelda Easter Egg

Of all the many classic video game franchises, few are as unanimously beloved by both gamers and developers alike as The Legend of Zelda series. The team at Ubisoft clearly rank amongst this iconic Nintendo series’ admirers – as the easter egg they tucked away in Odyssey proves.

In a tip of the hat to the most recent Zelda instalment, Breath of the Wild, a Korok – a small humanoid figure made out of clay, flower petals and twigs – can be found on the Pandora’s Cove coastline. Although this hidden tribute is now the most well-known Easter egg in the game, experts had no trouble tracking it down on their own within mere days of Odyssey’s release!

19 Achieve The Secret Ending

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey marks a dramatic change in direction for the franchise – from purely action/adventure outings to something closer to an action/RPG hybrid. This is reflected in how important the player’s actions are to the game’s overall narrative, and in particular, how that narrative reaches its climax.

Indeed, what the player decides to do – or just as importantly, say – will determine how events unfold next, and ultimately determine which of the game’s multiple endings they achieve.

Most players should be able to reach at least one ending.

If you complete every side quest and make all of the right decisions to unlock the secret, ultra ending, ensuring the best possible finale for your mercenary.

18 Visit Atlantis

As soon as Assassin’s Creed Odyssey’s Ancient Greece setting was announced, fans immediately began speculating over whether the fabled lost city of Atlantis would be part of its virtual environment. The good news is that Ubisoft hasn’t missed a trick, and Atlantis does indeed count among the many sunken locations scattered across the game’s humongous map. The bad news? It’s highly likely that only experts will be capable of uncovering the most eagerly anticipated (not to mention coolest) secret area in Odyssey.

The steps involved are extremely taxing, requiring players to traverse treacherous terrain, solve fiendish riddles posed by the Sphinx and dispatch a bevy of mythological horrors like Medusa, the Cyclops and the Minotaur!

17 Recruit Legendary NPCs Early

Over the course of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, players can enlist NPCs to serve as crew members aboard their ship, the Adrestia. Recruiting a high calibre crew is a great way to upgrade the Adrestia – so the trick is to bring legendary NPCs into the fold. Casual gamers will wait until they unlock these characters by completing quests, however experts are aware of a hidden mechanic that speeds up the whole process.

There’s a less publicized gameplay mechanic which enables you to recruit legendary NPCs by defeating them in combat using non-lethal takedowns.

Better yet, once your ship’s roster is made up entirely of legendary NPCs, you unlock the “Argonauts” trophy, too!

16 Regain The Cyclops Eye

One of the most frustrating moments in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey arrives early on, when you’re forced to give up the Cyclops’ Eye during Sequence 1. It’s not exactly the most classy of disposals, either: to put it bluntly, you squeeze it up the rear end of a poor, unsuspecting goat. If you’re scratching your head over this last revelation, then just trust us: it makes sense at the time!

Rookies will write off the Eye as a lost cause, but experts up to speed on the game’s secrets won’t give up so quickly. By engaging in an exhaustive goat-hunting expedition in Kephallonia, they’ll recover this valuable artifact, earning the dubious “Stink Eye” achievement, as well.

15 Change Their Ship’s Figurehead

Long-time fans of the series will recall that in Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag, you could easily customize your ship’s decorative figurehead as part of the normal upgrade process. Unfortunately, this isn’t something that carries over to Odyssey – and only expert players are likely to work out the secret method of doing this.

For starters, you need to defeat a boss – not exactly a walk in the park itself, by the way – and then behead them.

Once this has been take care of, if you scroll through the inventory of ship upgrade options, you’ll see your new souvenir listed. Select it, and voila! The Adrestia will have itself a brand new (and rather creepy) figurehead!

14 Track Down All Of The Cultist Clues

The underlying mythology of the Assassin’s Creed franchise incorporates several shadowy organisations – and Odyssey is no exception. The latest entry in the series introduces the nefarious Cult of Kosmos, and players aiming to get the most out of game’s story need to track down and eliminate key members of the group. In order to do so, they’ll have to swap their mercenary’s helmet for their detective’s cap, as the cultists’ whereabouts are only revealed by clues sprinkled through Odyssey’s sprawling Ancient Greece setting.

Some of these hints can be uncovered with little effort, whereas others will prove elusive to all but the most seasoned of gamers!

On the plus side, all of this running around pays off, as only players who chase down every single cultist will get to experience the game’s whole story.

13 Unlock Evie Frye

Assassin’s Creed Syndicate – the ninth video game in the main series – is headlined by twins Jacob and Evie Frye. Of the two siblings, Evie is arguably the more memorable – which is probably why she’s an unlockable character in Odyssey. Now, before you get too excited, bear in mind that Evie is a legendary NPC, so you won’t get to play as her directly.

Still, it’s incredibly cool to recruit her as a crew member on your ship, provided you’re an Ubisoft Club member with enough XP to afford her. See, unlocking Evie requires players to part with 7,500 XP in exchange for the “Master Assassin” badge, which only long-time fans of the franchise will have amassed!

12 Access Battle Royale Mode

Battle royale games like Fortnite and Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds are currently the hottest thing on the block. Making the most of modern online multiplayer capabilities, games in this genre pit a pack of players against each other in thrilling, last-man-standing contests.

Obviously, this stands in stark contrast to the single-player, open world experience offered by Assassin’s Creed Odyssey – until experts stumble across the “Call to Arms” sidequest. Found by scouring the island of Melos, this mission – which requires skilled players to wipe out 99 consecutive enemies – represents a thinly-veiled attempt by Ubisoft to acknowledge (or should that be “cash in on”?) the popularity of the battle royale genre!

11 Find The Black Panther Easter Egg

Black Panther is currently the second highest grossing film of 2018, and with that success comes a considerable fanbase, too. At least some of the developers at Ubisoft fall within that category, if the Black Panther Easter egg included in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is anything to go by. As experts will have no doubt already discovered, the game contains a fairly faithful recreation of Black Panther’s two most notable scenes: the duels that occur at the base of a waterfall.

This is staged at the Gortyn Waterfall, where players can first spectate on the melee using Eagle Vision.

That’s not all, though: it’s also possible to clamber up the cliff where the fight is going down, and actually confront the pair of brawlers yourself!

10 Discover Sam Fisher’s Goggles

So far we’ve focused solely on Assassin’s Creed Odyssey’s Ancient Greece setting – which disregards the fact that certain sections of the game are set in a present day safe house. Anyone unfamiliar with the franchise’s convoluted (some would say downright insane) science fiction elements, just trust us when we say that this does make sense.

Regardless of whether or not you buy into this more far-fetched aspect of the Assassin’s Creed mythology, there are multiple Easter eggs to dig up during these segments. Not all of these relate to the franchise either – just ask the experts who’ve unearthed the iconic, three-lensed night vision goggles worn by Sam Fisher, the protagonist of Ubisoft’s Splinter Cell games!

9 Stumble Across The Sword In The Stone

The team at Ubisoft has done a remarkable job of recreating an utterly convincing (albeit wildly fantastical) rendition of Ancient Greece in Odyssey. This awesome attention to detail is reflected in almost every aspect of the virtual environment, particularly the character and weapon design. We say “almost”, because at least one item experts will undoubtedly come across whilst roaming the game map definitely does not fit the time period depicted: the Sword in the Stone from Arthurian legend. Fortunately, this gag is an intentional mistake on the developer’s part.

Unfortunately, you can’t remove this legendary blade from its Lakonia resting place.

That’s a real shame: historical accuracy be damned – there’s always a place for Excalibur in our armory!

8 Locate The Rabbid Figure

Another easter egg squirrelled away in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey’s modern era safe house setting, the Rabbid figure is hard to spot if players blitz through these sequences. However, experts tend to favor a more methodical approach – even when confronted by the franchise’s moments of less than engaging gameplay.

These long-time campaigners will cast their eyes over every inch of the safe house, which means snooping around each room, no matter how empty it appears to be. This will eventually lead them to the shelves of a particularly untidy room. Here, they’ll spy the Rabbid toy – a cute shout-out to Ubisoft’s all-ages Rayman franchise, accompanied by a line of dialogue (“Bwaah?”) associated with these bunny-like characters.

7 Acquire The Epic Unicorn Skin

It doesn’t matter what mythology we’re talking about: unicorns are invariably treated as an incredibly rare species. Certainly, this carries over to the world of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, where players can indeed transform their horse into one of these awe-inspiring creatures – provided they can get their hands on a unicorn pelt.

They sport an eye-watering 6,400 Drachmae price tag!

Rookies who are feeling flush will plump for either the Black Unicorn or undeniably amazing (though sadly, non-flying) Pegasus skins, purchased with real-world cash from the Ubisoft Store. On the other hand, genuine experts prefer to earn their keep, and will trawl merchant stalls for the appropriately named, randomly-spawing Epic Unicorn skin, which leaves rainbow hoof prints.

6 Home Town Pride

The developers of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey hail from Ubisoft’s Montreal headquarters, based in Quebec. Like the citizens of any city or town, these guys and gals are proud of the place they call home – so much so that they managed to sneak a Quebec-related easter egg into the game!

It’s something that will almost certainly go unnoticed by less observant gamers, but experienced players – the type of people who scan the entire game environment for secret material – will discover a travel magazine whilst rifling through the safe house. The destination this mag is promoting? Why, Quebec, of course! True, it’s not exactly the most exciting bonus content in Odyssey, but it’s a nice touch all the same.

5 Put The Arena Spikes To Good Use

A key trait which separates veteran Assassin’s Creed players from newcomers is the willingness of the former to experiment with their surroundings. Take the spikes that dotted around the Arena in Odyssey.

Rookies will probably dismiss these as mere set dressing and completely ignore them once the fighting breaks out.

Don’t expect experts to make the same mistake, though. Already clued up on just how interactive the game worlds in the franchise can be, these gamers will immediately identify the potential for the spikes to deal damage to their opponents. The next thing you know, the edges of the Arena will begin to resemble a shish kebab vendor who trades in skewered would-be gladiatorial champions!

4 Reminisce About The Frye Twins

It turns out Assassin’s Creed Syndicate isn’t the only instalment in the franchise to take place in London – Odyssey does, too. True, the vast majority of the game is set in Ancient Greece, but its modern era sections unfold in London, something that won’t come as a shock to more attentive players.

After all, just by gazing out of the safe house windows, you can take in a decent view of London’s famous skyline, with what tourists would recognize as Big Beg especially prominent. What’s more, if you allow yourself a moment to properly contemplate the sight before your eyes, you’ll even trigger a line of dialogue that references Jacob and Evie Frye, the lead characters in Syndicate!

3 Discover All Of The Underwater Locations

As you might expect from a virtual environment that recreates the entire Aegean Sea, Atlantis isn’t the only submerged area on the Assassin’s Creed Odyssey map.

The ocean floor of Ubisoft’s vision of Ancient Greece is littered with dozens of hidden locations brimming with valuable treasure.

Anyone prepared to embrace their inner Jacques Cousteau will be in for a real treat. That said, given the sheer amount of exploration required to pinpoint all of these sunken locations – fun fact: at 130km², Odyssey’s map is 62% bigger than the already massive world of Origins – we’d wager only experts will visit all of them.

2 Get All Of The Other Endings As Well

Sure, everybody wants to get the best possible Assassin’s Creed Odyssey ending – you know: the super secret, totally awesome one we mentioned earlier. Even so, part of being an expert is also having a completist streak, which is why we think they’ll figure out how to achieve Odyssey’s eight other possible endings, as well.

This might not sound like much, but it’s actually quite a feat, for two main reasons. First of all, this game is absurdly long – the main quest alone clocks in at 40 hours of gameplay – so repeating it again and again is no picnic. Secondly, they’ll need to ensure they get every single word and deed right, in order to arrive at their desired conclusion!

1 Climb Up The Naked Statue

Full disclosure: this entry is unashamedly juvenile in nature, given it revolves around players scaling up a male statue and dangling from part of its anatomy (three guesses which part). Regardless, we’re positive that even the most mature expert will decide to do just that, when they pass by this landmark early on in Odyssey – honestly, it’s just too hard to resist.

You’ll be rewarded for your childish antics if you do.

Performing this act initiates a wry line of dialogue from the player’s mercenary, which just goes to show that Ubisoft definitely predicted this becoming a thing. Although to be honest, they hardly needed the talents of one of Ancient Greece’s oracles to foresee it!

Did we miss out any other things that only experts know how to do in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-09 06:10:21 – Leon Miller

Walking Dead Season 9 Premiere Live Ratings Hit All-Time Low

Despite kicking off Rick Grimes’ (Andrew Lincoln) heavily hyped final season, The Walking Dead’s season 9 premiere ratings fell to an all-time low. While AMC’s long-running zombie apocalypse drama ended season 8 by once again claiming the overall ratings crown among the advertiser-coveted 18-49-year-old demographic, it did so by much closer of a margin than it’s managed in the past. That’s because over the last two seasons, The Walking Dead has seen its ratings average absolutely plummet.

Last year’s season 8 ended up averaging a 3.4 in the 18-49 demo, and about 7.8 million total viewers per episode. That amounted to an over 30 percent drop in the total viewer and demo averages posted by season 7. On that subject, season 7 averaged a 5.4 in the 18-49 demo and drew about 11.3 million viewers, itself a considerable drop from season 6’s 6.5 demo average and 13 million total viewer average per episode. While it’s fair to say that scripted TV as a whole has seen huge dips in live viewership in the last several years, the size of Walking Dead’s falls have been much bigger than most, if only because it had farther to fall.

Related: Maggie Was RIGHT In The Walking Dead Season 9 Premiere

Going into season 9, positive advance reviews and an above average amount of hype surrounding the impending departures of stars Andrew Lincoln and Lauren Cohan looked poised to possibly right the ratings ship for Walking Dead. Sadly, that doesn’t look like it’ll be the case. As reported by TV By The Numbers, season 9’s premiere – entitled “A New Beginning” – earned only a 2.5 in the 18-49 demo, and drew in a total audience of just over 6 million live viewers. That’s down a whopping 50 percent from the 5.0 demo rating posted by season 8’s premiere, and over 30 percent from its total audience.

To put things fully in perspective, that 2.5 is The Walking Dead’s lowest premiere rating ever, even below the 2.7 earned by the series’ October 2010 debut. Sunday’s total viewer count was slightly higher than Walking Dead’s series premiere at least, which was watched live by 5.4 million viewers. Whichever way you look at it though, these numbers aren’t a good omen for season 9’s ratings prospects.

However, there’s one other factor worth considering, first pointed out earlier today by Comic Book. Last year, AMC launched a premium streaming service called AMC Premiere, which lets subscribers watch episodes ad-free, and in some cases, early. It’s only available to those who subscribe to a TV package containing AMC, but still, season 9’s premiere was made available 24 hours in advance to AMC Premiere users. Figures on how many people used that service to view the episode early aren’t available, but it definitely could’ve cut into the live viewership count. With that in mind, the real test of season 9’s ratings may be next week, although it’s worth noting that numbers rarely go up after a show’s season premiere.

More: Walking Dead Showrunner Explains Negan’s Absence From Season 9 Premiere

The Walking Dead season 9 airs Sundays on AMC.

Source: TV By The Numbers, Comic Book



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2018-10-09 03:10:07 – Michael Kennedy

30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles

Landing a part in the latest major superhero movie release represents the pinnacle of many an acting career. Michael Keaton, Hugh Jackman, Chris Evans and, to some extent, Robert Downey Jr might not be the household names they are today were it not for their comic book exploits.

However, while headlining the latest cinematic effort involving a caped crusader of some kind represents a dream come true for many, it’s proven to be something of a nightmare for a rare few. Bad scripts, difficult directors and a toxic work environment are just some of the many myriad reasons cited by the actors and actresses in this list – yet that’s really only the tip of the iceberg. Studio politics, stalled contract negotiations or issues around costume, make-up and iffy computer effects have also played a role in making these superhero movies not-so-super for the stars involved.

More often than not, the resulting movie has been forgettable at best and downright terrible at worst – but there are exceptions to the rule. Sometimes, an actor ended up enduring a miserable time on an otherwise enjoyable project. Other times, far sinister things were going on, unbeknownst to many involved in the finished movie.

Plenty of flops feature on this countdown but some major moneymakers can be found too, with comic book movie properties tied to Marvel, 2000AD, DC and Titan Comics all present and not very correct. Yes, landing a part in the latest superhero movie blockbuster has represented the pinnacle of many an acting career down the years but for this lot, it represented the pits.

Here are 30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles.

30 Hugo Weaving – Red Skull

Hugo Weaving originally signed a multi-picture deal to play the Red Skull across various future Captain America movies. However, when the character returned in Avengers: Infinity War the character had been recast with The Walking Dead’s Ross Marquand taking Weaving’s place. It wasn’t a huge shock.

A few years prior, The Matrix actor told Collider playing the Red Skull was “not something I would want to do again.”

“It’s not the sort of film I seek out and really am excited by,” he said. “I increasingly like to go back to what I used to always do, which is to get involved with projects that I really have a personal affiliation with.”

29 Ryan Reynolds – Green Lantern

Ryan Reynolds has made no secret of the fact things didn’t exactly go to plan with 2011’s Green Lantern. He even went as far as to include a gag, poking fun at the project, in Deadpool 2. Though it’s something he is able to laugh about now, it’s clear the actor regrets signing on that particular dotted line.

“When we shot Green Lantern, nobody auditioning for the role of Green Lantern was given the opportunity to read the script because the script didn’t exist,” Reynolds told The Hollywood Reporter. The experience did at least teach him some valuable lessons about making superhero movies which was good news for Deadpool fans.

28 Jessica Alba – Invisible Woman

Jessica Alba’s experience playing Sue Storm in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer was so bad it left her considering a career change. “I wanted to stop acting. I hated it. I really hated it,” Alba told Elle [via SyFy].

“I remember when I was dying in ‘Silver Surfer’. The director [Tim Story] was like, ‘It looks too real. It looks too painful. Can you be prettier when you cry? Cry pretty, Jessica.’ He was like, ‘Don’t do that thing with your face. Just make it flat. We can CGI the tears in.'” She continued: “It all got me thinking: Am I not good enough?”

27 Ben Affleck – Daredevil

Ben Affleck doesn’t just regret starring in the 2003 movie adaptation of Daredevil, he hates it. Affleck let his feelings be known to TimeTalks [via NME] during a discussion about why he signed on for Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice. Affleck said: “Part of it was I wanted for once to get one of these movies and do it right – to do a good version. I hate Daredevil so much.”

“The Netflix show does really cool stuff,” he added.

“I feel like that was there for us to do with that character, and we never kind of got it right. I wanted to do one of those movies and sort of get it right,” Affleck stated.

26 Terrence Howard – War Machine

Terrence Howard has always blamed Robert Downey Jr for the fact he never got to reprise the role of James Rhodes in the Iron Man sequels. “It turns out that the person that I helped become Iron Man, when it was time to re-up for the second one, took the money that was supposed to go to me and pushed me out,” Howard told Watch What Happens Live [via Vulture].

Howard claims the studio offered to pay him “one-eighth of what we contractually had” and when he tried to call Downey Jr to talk about it “he didn’t call me back for three months.”

25 Idris Elba – Heimdall

Idris Elba’s experience working on Thor: The Dark World was so bad the actor described parts of it as “torture” to The Telegraph. In the interview, Elba recalled how he was forced to complete reshoots in London for the Thor sequel just days after return from filming the prestige biopic Mandela, in South Africa.

“In between takes I was stuck there [hanging from a harness], fake hair stuck on to my head with glue, this fucking helmet, while they reset, he said. “And I’m thinking: ‘24 hours ago, I was Mandela.’ … Then there I was, in this stupid harness, with this wig and this sword and these contact lenses. It ripped my heart out.”

24 Ryan Reynolds – Wolverine: X-Men Origins

Ryan Reynolds’ appearance as Deadpool in Wolverine: X-Men Origins was plagued with problems, starting with the character’s appearance. “He wound up being this abomination of Deadpool that was like Barakapool, with his mouth sewn shut and weird blades that came out of his hands and these strange tattoos and stuff like that,” he told GQ.

Though Reynolds objected, the studio pressed on.

“The conversation at the time was ‘If you want to play Deadpool, this is your chance to introduce him. And if you don’t want to introduce him in this fashion, we’ll have someone else play him.'”When the film leaked online and fans reacted angrily, Reynolds response was simple: “told you so”.

23 Ed Norton – Hulk

Ed Norton clashed with producers behind the scenes on The Incredible Hulk, having only agreed to play Bruce Banner on the proviso he could have a say on the script and direction of the film. Replaced by Mark Ruffalo in the MCU, Norton couldn’t resist having a dig at the film during an appearance on Comedy Central’s Roast of Bruce Willis.

“I tried to be like you,” he told Willis [via Indiewire]. “I did a big action movie called The Incredible Hulk. You know what went wrong? I wanted a better script…I thought we should make one Marvel movie as good as the worst Christopher Nolan movie, but what the hell was I thinking.”

22 George Clooney – Batman

Joel Schumacher’s Batman & Robin may have fallen flat with critics and fans alike but it proved to be a serious career wake-up call for its star, George Clooney. “Up until that moment, I was an actor only concerned with finding work,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “After the failure of that film creatively, I understood that I needed to take control of the films I made, not just the role.”

Clooney successfully banished memories of his time as Batman with next three films: Out of Sight, Three Kings and O Brother, Where Art Thou?

21 Tommy Lee Jones – Two-Face

Tommy Lee Jones hated working on Batman Forever or, rather, he hated working with co-star Jim Carrey. “I was the star and that was the problem,” Carrey explained on Norm MacDonald Live [via THR].

The situation came to a head when Carrey ended up in the same restaurant as Jones during filming.

“I went over and I said, ‘Hey Tommy, how are you doing?’ and the blood just drained from his face,” Carrey said. “He went to hug me and he said, ‘I hate you. I really don’t like you.’ And I said, ‘What’s the problem?’ and pulled up a chair, which probably wasn’t smart. And he said, ‘I cannot sanction your buffoonery.'”

20 Topher Grace – Venom

Topher Grace never felt entirely comfortable in the role of Eddie Brock/Venom having bagged the role in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3. “I was a huge fan of the character of Venom when I was a kid when Todd McFarlane brought him into the comic,” he told Michael Rosenbaum on the Inside of You podcast [via Cinemablend]. “And I was surprised and a little bit like ‘Huh?’ when they wanted me to play it.”

Not only does Grace accept he was miscast, but he also agrees Tom Hardy is perfect for the role. “When I look at it now… [at Tom Hardy’s Venom movie] I go ‘That’s the guy.'”

19 Mickey Rourke – Ivan Vanko

Micky Rourke trashed the bigwigs over at Marvel Studios for what they did to his character Ivan Vanko, in Iron Man 2. Rourke told Syfy that he had worked hard with writer Justin Theroux and director Jon Favreau to flesh out his Russian villain and turn him into a three-dimensional character. Someone behind-the-scenes had other ideas though.

“I wanted to bring some other layers and colors, not just make this Russian a complete murderous revenging bad guy,” he said. “Unfortunately, the [people] at Marvel just wanted a one-dimensional bad guy, so most of the performance ended up the floor.”

18 Alicia Silverstone – Batgirl

Alicia Silverstone was on the receiving end of some serious body shaming while working on Batman & Robin. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Silverstone, who was a huge star following the success of Clueless, was under intense scrutiny over her weight with one critic reportedly observing she “looked more Babe than babe.”

When rumor got out on set that she was having issues with her costume fittings, a storyboard artist ever put together a joke cartoon of Batgirl, mocking Silverstone’s issues.

The fake poster for Clueless 2: The Casting of Batgirl might have gone down well with the guys in the film’s art department but studio bosses were far from impressed.

17 Nicolas Cage – Ghost Rider

Nicolas Cage has previously spoken of his disappointment at his two Ghost Rider movies, which he felt played it too safe. Speaking to JoBlo [via Bloody Disgusting], Cage explained that he and writer David S. Goyer had always envisioned the films as being gritty and, most importantly, R-rated.

“Ghost Rider was a movie that always should’ve been an R-rated movie,” Cage said. “David Goyer had a brilliant script which I wanted to do with David, and for whatever reason, they just didn’t let us make the movie.” Though he believes there is the potential for someone else to take on the role and go down that dark path, Cage is done with the character.

16 Jim Carrey – Colonel Stars And Stripes

Jim Carrey stunned social media ahead of the release of Kick-Ass 2 by denouncing the film and its “level of violence” in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre. Carrey, who is an outspoken advocate for increased gun control, took to Twitter following the incident to explain that he could no longer support the film.

“I did Kick-Ass 2 a month b4 Sandy Hook and now in all good conscience I cannot support that level of violence,” he wrote [via The Guardian]. “My apologies to others involve[d] with the film. I am not ashamed of it but recent events have caused a change in my heart.”

15 Michael Jai White – Spawn

He may have been among the first African American actors to portray a major comic book superhero but Michael Jai White has little love for his sole outing as Spawn. In fact, White is a much bigger fan of his small but powerful role as the gangster Gambol in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

He even went as far as to conduct an interview with The Hollywood Reporter revisiting his performance alongside Heath Ledger.

During the interview, White couldn’t resist having a dig at Spawn: “There is no footage of me ever saying that I liked Spawn. I have never said that I thought that was a good movie.” Ouch.

14 Jared Leto – The Joker

Jared Leto was left far from happy with the version of Suicide Squad that made it to the cinemas. Asked by IGN whether any scenes involving the Joker were cut from the film, Leto let rip.

“There were so many scenes that got cut from the movie, I couldn’t even start. I think that the Joker… we did a lot of experimentation on the set, we explored a lot. There’s so much that we shot that’s not in the film,” he said. “If I die anytime soon, it’s probably likely that it’ll surface somewhere. That’s the good news about the death of an actor is all that stuff seems to come out.”

13 Halle Berry – Catwoman

Halle Berry’s regret at signing up for Catwoman was clear to see when she decided to make an appearance at the annual Razzie Awards back in 2005. A celebration of the year’s worst films and performances, Berry ‘won’ the Worst Actress gong for her efforts in Catwoman and, in a surprising turn of events, was on hand to deliver a memorable acceptance speech.

“I want to thank Warner Bros. for casting me in this piece-of-sh**, god-awful movie,” she said [via MTV], going on to mock the rest of her cast. “I’d like to thank the rest of the cast. To give a really bad performance like mine, you need to have really bad actors.”

12 Alan Cumming – Nightcrawler

Back when Alan Cumming was still in the frame to reprise his role as Nightcrawler in X-Men: The Last Stand, the Scottish actor shocked journalists with his response to the news Bryan Singer would not be returning for the third installment.

“I’m not disappointed, I can’t deny it,” Cumming said [via Movieweb]. “I think he’s really talented. I’m very proud of the film. I think it’s a great film. I didn’t enjoy working with him on the film.”

Evidently, Singer and Cumming didn’t see eye to eye on X-Men 2 though the source of their fractious relationship has never been divulged.

11 Ellen Page – Kitty Pryde

Ellen Page took to Facebook in 2017 to accuse director Brett Ratner of harassment during their time together on 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand. According to Page, Ratner mocked her sexuality during promotional work for the film. Page was only 18 at the time.

“‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’ He said this about me during a cast and crew ‘meet and greet’ before we began filming, X Men: The Last Stand,” Page wrote. “He looked at a woman standing next to me, ten years my senior, pointed to me and said: ‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’”

10 Michael Fassbender – Magneto

Back in 2016, during the Toronto Film Festival’s pre-opening-night fundraising event, honoree Michael Fassbender surprised those in attendance by laying into his performance as Magneto in X-Men: Days of Future Past. According to Vulture, during a segment in which clips from several of Fassbender’s films were shown, Fassbender started “cringing and rubbing his face with embarrassment”.

“I don’t actually like that performance there, to be honest,” Fassbender said after the highlights reel finished. “I just think it’s me shouting. It’s just like [making a face and flailing his arms around] some dude shouting.”

9 Jamie Bell – Thing

Rumoured unrest on the set of Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie, coupled with the movie’s bad reviews left a bad taste in the mouth of its star, Jamie Bell. “There were several things on that movie I was clearly not privy to because I’m just an actor and I just do my stuff on set,” Bell told the Los Angeles Times.

“Everything starts with the best of intentions. A production begins with the idea to make something that’s unique and original and with integrity,” he said.

“I don’t know what happened between the launch of the voyage and the arrival. I think we were all bitterly disappointed with that film,” stated Bell.

8 Josh Brolin – Jonah Hex

Production delays, directorial changes, script rewrites, reshoots, and some pretty heavy-handed editing helped make Jonah Hex one of the most disappointing comic book movies of all time. It’s something the film’s star, Josh Brolin, is only too aware of. In fact, he revealed in an interview with the Nerdist that he hates it just as much as everyone else.

“Oh, ‘Jonah Hex,’ hated it. Hated it,” he said [via Collider]. “The experience of making it — that would have been a better movie based on what we did. As opposed to what ended up happening to it, which is going back and reshooting 66 pages in 12 days.”

7 Jennifer Garner – Elektra

While Ben Affleck bounced back from his Daredevil movie, Jennifer Garner never quite got going again after her spin-off effort, Elektra, bombed. Though Garner has never spoken openly about the film, her ex-boyfriend and close friend Michael Vartan revealed to Us Weekly [via SFGate] that the Alias actress was very unhappy with how the film turned out.

“I heard [Elektra] was awful. [Jennifer] called me and told me it was awful,” Vartan said. “She had to do it because of Daredevil. It was in her contract.” Garner has never denied Vartan’s claims.

6 Edward Furlong – The Crow

The Crow: Wicked Prayer is an absolute stinker of a comic book movie and currently boasts a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

It’s star, Edward Furlong, struggled to show much in the way of enthusiasm for the role during an interview with Movieweb.

Asked about how he prepared for the film’s starring role, Furlong said: “It’s sort of like a really slow process that Lance Mungia, the director, and I went through. Initially, I was just attracted to the script because it was The Crow and I got to put on some leather pants and kick people’s ass.” Given how it turned out, he must be regretting signing up for such flimsy reasons.

5 Chloë Grace Moretz – Hit-Girl

Chloe Moretz made her name as Hit Girl in Mark Millar’s original Kick-Ass but, despite the first film holding a special place in her heart, she’s always been less enthusiastic about the sequel.

During an appearance on a panel at the Provincetown Film Festival in 2018, Moretz made those feelings crystal clear. “I love the franchise, I think the first movie was really, really special. I wish the second one had been handled in a little bit of a different way,” she said [via Cinemablend]. “Because I think we were all kind of looking forward to something a little different than what happened with it all.”

4 Kate Mara – The Invisible Woman

Kate Mara played Sue Storm in Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie and, in an interview with The Times[via Yahoo] revealed the negative aura surrounding the film made her “a little gun-shy” about seeing the finished film.

“You don’t always have to learn some incredible life lesson when making a s*** movie. Sometimes it’s just what happens,” she said. “[Fantastic Four] was a tricky shoot but you know when you know when you’re shooting it that a film isn’t going to be what you want it to be? That was not the case at all.”

3 Jamie Kennedy – The Mask

Son of the Mask saw Jamie Kennedy replace Jim Carrey as the franchise’s star, with almost unwatchable results.

Though the movie is widely regarded as one of the worst ever made, Kennedy’s biggest regret may boil down to the make-up he had to wear on the film.

“I wore it 6 days in a row, and after that it gets rough,” he told Movieweb. “I had ears in this one, and Jim Carrey didn’t in the first one, so they would like press against my real ears and cut the circulation, so I would have to like rub my ears a bit after having on the makeup to get the blood flowing again.”

2 Sylvester Stallone – Judge Dredd

Despite starring in such turkeys as Over The Top, Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot and Oscar, Sylvester Stallone’s biggest regret was reserved for another movie. “The biggest mistake I ever made was with the sloppy handling of Judge Dredd” he once declared [via Den of Geek]. “The philosophy of the film was not set in stone – by that I mean, ‘Is this going to be a serious drama or with comic overtones’, like other science fiction films that were successful? So a lotta pieces just didn’t fit smoothly.”

“The design work on it was fantastic, and the sets were incredibly real, even standing two feet away, but there was just no communication,” he stated.

1 Lori Petty – Tank Girl

Lori Petty had a very particular gripe with the way things turned out for her Tank Girl movie: it was given an R rating. “There is nothing about that movie that is R. Nothing. Except there’s a woman talking s***. That’s why they rated it R. If they were going to rate it R I should have been butt-naked all the time, running around,” she told AV Club.

Tommy Boy came out that weekend, too, which is a hysterical movie, but it was rated PG-13. Do you know how many people bought Tommy Boy tickets and went to see Tank Girl? A billion.”

Are there any other superhero actors who regretted their roles? Sound off in the comments!



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2018-10-08 03:10:25 – Jack Beresford

Walking Dead: Chris Hardwick, Chandler Riggs, & More Remember Scott Wilson

Less than a day after news broke that Scott Wilson had passed away, several cast and crew members from AMC’s The Walking Dead TV show – old, current, and new – are paying tribute to the late actor on social media. Prior to The Walking Dead season 9 premiere this weekend, the network brought several cast members (including Andrew Lincoln) and franchise producers, as well as new showrunner Angela Kang, to New York Comic Con 2018 to promote the upcoming new season.

It was during the series’ panel at The Hulu Theater in Madison Square Garden that Kang announced Wilson and Sonequa Martin-Green would be reprising their roles as Hershel Greene and Sasha Williams, respectively, in season 9. While the details regarding their return were kept under wraps, the news itself was met with applause. Sadly, it was only a few hours later that word got out of Wilson’s passing. (According to his representative, he passed away from complications with leukemia.) And now, several people that knew him on the acclaimed series are paying their respects.

Related: Walking Dead: Andrew Lincoln Teases That Rick Grimes Might Not Survive

In the time since Wilson’s passing yesterday, cast and crew members such as Chandler Riggs (Carl Grimes), Tom Payne (Jesus), and more, including Talking Dead host Chris Hardwick, have issued statements about the Wilson’s death online. Below is a small collection of those tributes, beginning with Hardwick’s:

Even though Wilson’s character was killed off way back in season 4, his legacy continues to live on, something that audiences will see throughout season 9. Furthermore, while the news regarding Wilson’s season 9 return only recently broke during New York Comic Con weekend, Wilson had reportedly already filmed his scenes for the production, thus meaning that he will still appear in the show, unless, of course, the producers decide to cut his scenes out. But that’s something that fans will just have to wait and see what happens.

At the moment, it’s unclear when Wilson will make his return, posthumously of course, in The Walking Dead season 9, but it’s safe to assume that it would be sometime in the first half of the season. The cast and crew are still in the midst of filming the season’s second half, and since Wilson’s Hershel was Maggie’s father, it makes sense that he would reappear in one of the episodes Lauren Cohan is in. After all, Cohan is slated to exit the series during the first half of season 9, though there is always the possibility that she could return in a future season.

Next: Walking Dead Gets New Opening Credits Sequence For Season 9

The Walking Dead premieres on October 7 on AMC.

Source: Various (see links)



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2018-10-07 02:10:06 – Mansoor Mithaiwala

A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad (And Always Has Been)

WARNING: Major spoilers for A Star Is Born

A Star Is Born‘s ending undoes what could have been a Hollywood classic – but that’s not exactly Bradley Cooper’s fault. From its first version in 1937, A Star Is Born has always had a problematic resolution to its story, one that’s only got worse over the past century, and this latest version is no different.

A Star Is Born is a classic story that Hollywood loves so much it’s told it four times (with a suspiciously-similar earlier version, several failed attempts and many, many imitators). A top-of-his-game star (in 2018, Bradley Cooper’s rock star Jackson Maine) is suffering from alcoholism and in a stupor discovers a struggling artist (Lady Gaga as Ally, a waitress moonlighting in a drag bar), falling in love with both her and her talent. He provides her with a big break, sending her fame into the stratosphere just as his addictions begin to derail his career. The pair marry, but despite their love things begin to fray.

Related: Read Our A Star Is Born Review

It’s a tale of rags to riches, of falls from grace, of the power of love, and personal identity within all of that. And, for much of the runtime, A Star Is Born 2018 is genuinely a great version of all those stories. Gaga’s first major concert leaves you floating, Cooper shows mental affliction with grace, both perform their songs incredibly (to actual live crowds, no less), and are utterly believable as troubled lovers. It is, for much of its runtime, a very good film worthy of that deafening hype.

However, everything implodes into a black hole of pretentiousness as what could have been a great film its own right has to follow through on being called A Star Is Born

  • This Page: The Problem With A Star Is Born’s Ending
  • Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad
  • Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

What Happens In A Star Is Born’s Ending

We’ll stick with Cooper’s take for now before going deeper into the past. A Star Is Born‘s third act is kicked off by Ally winning the Grammy for Best New Artist – a major step for her career, undercut entirely by Jack drunkenly taking to the stage with her and relieving himself on live TV. He goes into rehab and she wrestles with where her focus should lie, eventually deciding to try and protect her recovering husband. She cancels her European tour when her agent, Rez, blocks the duo playing together.

As a result, Jack kills himself. He’s confronted by a seething Rez who has no sympathies or expectations of sobriety and states outright Jack’s ruining his wife’s career. When she matter-of-fact states the tour cancellation, he sees the impact of his actions and, while she plays a concert, he hangs himself in their garage.

Related: Every Song On A Star Is Born’s Soundtrack

This breaks Ally at first, leaving her emotionally distraught, before her understanding the meaning of Jack’s sacrifice – to enable her to truly become the star he always saw – helps her pull through. The film ends at a tribute concert in Jack’s memory. “My name is Ally Maine.” she declares before singing “I’ll Never Love Again”, a song based on their relationship they wrote together while he was recovering. A flashback shows the pair singing, she looks through the camera at the audience, the end.

Why A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad

Removing the ending of all presentation and self-imposed importance (a character looking into the camera at the end is an overused trope that Cooper simply doesn’t earn), in just writing down the events of A Star Is Born its problems should be obvious.

Jack decides to kill himself to save his wife, committing suicide because it’s the only way to set her free. This comes about two hours into a film which has slowly built up its numerous interpersonal relationships, and so comes as a drastic and rather unearned turn. Now, there is an argument to be made about accuracy to the unpredictability of mental illness, but given the intimacy audiences had with both Jack and Ally up until this moment, that doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. A Star Is Born, plainly, presents suicide as the only way out. It’s meant to come across as a selfless act but still values success as a true route to happiness, meaning anything emotional about the “gesture” is laced with hypocrisy.

But it’s what comes after and Ally’s coming to terms with her loss that’s so disquieting. For all her innate talent being the drive of the story and her freely made decision to step back what motivated Jack to kill himself, the final scene makes everything about Jack; the mononymous singer for the first time takes on her husband’s surname at his concert, where she performs a song that he helped her write in her original singer style. The suggestion is meant to be that Jack was holding her back, but in the shadow of the previous two hours the strange implication is that the act of a true star being born came from the adversity of Jack’s sacrifice. Making Ally’s success symbiotic to her dead husband is already heavily in the text of the film, but the final scene makes her final ascension even more indebted to his drastic act.

It’s hard to not read A Star Is Born‘s ending as trivializing suicide down to a plot point to give the fundamentally broken male lead the defining role in its female protagonist’s arc. It’s a weird move to make in 2018, although don’t believe this is just the product of an 80-year-old movie being remade. There’s something flawed at the heart of A Star Is Born.

Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad

The True Story Behind A Star Is Born’s Ending Explains The Problem

There have been four versions of A Star Is Born: the 1937 Hollywood-skewering original starring Janet Gaynor and Frederick March, the 1954 musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 shift to the music industry with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the latest Cooper/Gaga release. Each one has its own quirks, but all endeavor to tell the same story of love and fame intertwined, and all have the same basic ending. But the 1937 version isn’t the start. While A Star Is Born‘s narrative is a fiction, it’s very much based on truth; each movie is rooted heavily in the entertainment industry of the time – Hollywood for the 1937 and 1954 versions, music for 1976 and 2018 – and aims to tell an encapsulating story. There are some real-life events that inspired it.

The established star falling for an unknown as she climbs to the top was seen in actors Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay’s relationship, with the pair marrying in 1928 when the former was an unknown after starring in a Broadway show together. Their marriage fell apart after she rose above him and he fell into alcoholism. They separated in 1935 after seven years of marriage, two years before A Star Is Born was released. This appears to have been composited with the death of silent film actor John Bowers, who died at sea in 1936 after failing to win a part (whether it was a suicide or not is unclear). There are others (as we’ll see) but these are regarded as the ones who powered the 1937 version.

Related: Lady Gaga Fans Are Trolling Venom With Fake Bad Reviews

Of course, there’s one key distinction between inspiration and movie: in real life, it was two unrelated stories. There are the famous lovers who piggyback success and the past-it star who takes his own life, but in all cases these two aspects are entirely independent; the woman goes on to greater success by cutting the man out, while elsewhere another man falls from grace. Both stories epitomize Hollywood together, and taken alongside each other rather than melded have an ingrained believability. A Star Is Born trades that for something more streamlined in having the suicide be the culmination of the romance, but it’s also idealistic and wistful, losing the real moral of either.

This is reflected in what is regarded as a proto-Star Is Born, the 1932 film What Price Hollywood? Released five years before the 1937 version and produced also by David O. Selznick (and directed by George Cukor, who was approached for the first A Star Is Born and directed the first remake), this is regarded as something of a dry run at the story. Obviously from the release year it can’t share the same real-life inspirations (although, because this is the Golden Age of Hollywood, there are others pointed to), but the core concept and even smaller story beats are there, albeit with one massive difference: the leads are not romantically involved. Lowell Sherman’s Max drunkenly finds Constance Bennett’s Mary and helps make her a star, eventually killing himself after he sees realizes how far he’s fallen and is hurting his friend, while Mary’s suffers an ill-fated marriage that breaks down due to her absences filming and is reconciled at the end.

Watched today, What Price Hollywood? has a cynicism about the film industry ahead of its time despite ultimately being a movie romanticizing Hollywood – and at the core of this is the tragic story of Max and its impact on Mary’s life. The title question is apt.

How The Remakes Have Tried To “Fix” The Ending

In contrast to What Price Hollywood?, A Star Is Born 1937 carries a self-awareness and charm, but in bridging the romantic and the career side of protagonist Esther creates the problematic suicide reading. It’s not helped by dated elements, including the defining part of Esther’s ascension being the actress known as Vicki Lester taking on her husband’s name with a declaration “This is Mrs. Norman Maine“. It works given the time period, but even 16 years later needed an update.

Related: Watch the Trailer For A Star Is Born

The 1954 version is, for the most part, a beat-for-beat remake, just with dance number expansion to make it a musical, but it does make some strides to justifying the ending. The toll that caring for a drunk has on Judy Garland’s Vicki Lester is shown gradually, most upsettingly in an off-stage breakdown she immediately returns to filming from: an unavoidable presentation of the line between art and performer. But, ultimately, it ends in the same way: Norman Maine overhears Vicki’s plans to quit acting to care for her husband, so he feigns going for a swim and drowns himself; after a traumatic period and being unmasked at her funeral (the invasion of the press), Vicki returns to the public eye where she declares herself “Mrs. Norman Maine“. Every issue discussed is here.

The 1976’s A Star Is Born is overall incredibly melodramatic, nowhere less than its handling of the ending. What it should be praised for is its attempts at giving the female lead a greater sense of autonomy: throughout Streisand’s Esther makes decisions that power the narrative, not just being led along by Kristoffersen as those who came before her, but that’s lost thuddingly in the finale. After his meltdown, John Howard has imposed isolation – not rehab – and when returning home immediately sleeps with a reporter wanting an interview for Esther. The couple tries to power past this, but John figures he’s still broken and crashes his car at high speeds. Again, Esther is sad before taking his name (and singing at a tribute event).

Like we’ve already explored with A Star Is Born 2018, all versions have tried to provide their own contemporary spin on the tale to iron out its kinks, yet all wind up having to repeat the same suicide-anger-name triple-tap that doesn’t belong. A degree can be accounted to the changing times, but that ignores that the original trio of movies released over nearly 40 years, and that Cooper wasn’t able to address it either.

Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

Why Bradley Cooper Can’t Fix A Star Is Born

Bradley Cooper certainly tries to bring a modern slant to the worn tale of A Star Is Born. He invests heavily in making Jack and Ally’s opposite trajectories operate independently – Jack is suffering from tinnitus before he’s heard a note of “La Vie En Rose”, while Ally’s SNL appearance is deemed to contradict his advice – while making the love story more immediate. It’s a bigger story, more personal and considerably more consummately paced.

But, like all the others, the ending hits a snag. And some of his decisions make it worse. The method of final descent is different, with the awards show upset and rehab undone not by Maine going off the rails again as in every other take, but rather by Ally’s agent calling his supposed bluff. It’s implied from the British Rez knowing when exactly Jackson first toured across the pond that he was once a fan, now disillusioned with his hero, making him a millennial scapegoat to any affronting reading.

Related: 2018 Fall Movie Preview: The 30 Films to See

This generational push and pull could have been what sent A Star Is Born to greatness. Sam Elliott’s speech about there only being twelve notes played over and over, with the majesty coming from how the artist uses them is a beautiful sentiment that sees Cooper self-justifying another remake and appears like a zen view on the entertainment business that birthed it. Except it isn’t, because this idea is also trying to explain the ending, claiming that the music industry is cyclical and that stars are born and then new stars are born later; Jack’s death is enabling that. What the film seems to miss is that for one state to ever enter another, a star must always die. Ally will fall too. The raw textual argument is that the failures are as eternal as the successes, raising the question of worth, yet the film provides no further exploration and presents it as somehow immediately uplifting.

And that’s the hump that A Star Is Born 2018, like its predecessors, can’t get over. The story thinks it’s a biting, self-aware take on itself, but it’s too close to the subject to see that it’s really just propagating a harsh cycle. This isn’t helped by the film being weighted by so much – the casting of Lady Gaga, his writer-director-producer-actor whammy, even Sam Elliott as the Sam Elliott-type – although those concerns are also the key explanation for what’s really going on.

A Star Is Born Only Exists Because Of Ego

Throughout this article, there’s been one question dangling unspoken. Why are there four versions of A Star Is Born anyway? It’s a story that is flawed and dated, on a topic which has been tackled in more films than any other. Yes, each movie got serious Oscar nominations and wins, but that alone isn’t enough to justify going back. The true answer is enlightening.

1954’s A Star Is Born was conceived as a bid to restart Judy Garland’s career after it stalled over the 1940s. 1976’s A Star Is Born was Barbra Streisand’s attempt (along with then-husband Jon Peters) to boost her standing in Hollywood. And 2018’s A Star Is Born is Bradley Cooper’s grand attempt to win the Oscar that he believes he deserves (his entire post-Hangover career is a carefully played game of chess with a Golden Baldie the King). There are studio concerns too (before Cooper, Warner Bros had been attempting to get a remake off the ground since the early 2010s, although as a Beyonce vehicle has the same career expansion goals), but those are the primary purposes of each version. A Star Is Born is a vanity project on repeat.

Related: A Star Is Born Is An Oscar Favorite – But Could An Infamous Producer Hurt Its Chances?

Now, vanity projects needn’t be bad, and indeed a lot of good comes from each of these attempts. Indeed, each was ultimately successful in both their primary and commercial goals: Garland’s career was rejuvenated; Streisand won her second Oscar; and Cooper’s currently the front-runner in multiple categories for next year’s Academy Awards.

But this aspect appears to be why each version of A Star Is Born struggles to understand the real meaning of its ending. Each powering force believes this movie will be what takes them being a Norman/Jack Maine to a new Esther/Ally while missing that it’s built into the story to be impossible. They believe so much in the two contradictory Hollywood legends wholesale, so don’t see that the story is almost warning against such a thing.

A Star Is Born Is No Longer Needed

In recent years, we’ve seen Hollywood’s reliable rotation of movies about itself take a genuinely incisive slant. 2015’s Best Picture Winner Birdman was an ostentatious exploration of ego that too ended with the protagonist committing suicide, but there it was with the wry critique that fame and adoration are fleeting and that such a bold act was the only way for the self-involved hero to reach the heights he dreamed of. Then there’s 2017’s almost-Best Picture Winner La La Land, which was a celebration of Hollywood-gone-by looking at love in a city of stars, eventually concluding that success required the sacrifice of the central relationship.

Together, these take on all the ideas that A Star Is Born is playing with and apply them in a more thoughtful way. The messages are more widely applicable and their endnotes have considerably less of the hypocrisy. Birdman and La La Land may find joy in the arts, but they also uncover the trials of creativity and fame, keeping the brutal truths in earshot while presenting from a position of success.

A Star Is Born 2018 is a good movie, an undeniable achievement for both Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. But there is a flaw at the heart of the tale that just doesn’t ring true. Unless it’s made with a completely revisionist, ego-less eye, in twenty years we do not need another one.

More: Every Version Of A Star Is Born Ranked, From Garland To Gaga



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2018-10-06 01:10:52 – Alex Leadbeater

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey: How To Get The Best Ending

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey has arrived, and it certainly leaves a big impression. Its massive open world and variety of additional content makes it a hugely impressive and immersive experience, and one where it’s capable to lose hours at a time. Beyond that, however, the game also has a tightly wound and highly personal story to tell.

That said, players will have to pay attention during the game’s main narrative. Rather than losing themselves in completing Conquest Battles, a bit of care is needed during the core plot. That’s because Assassin’s Creed Odyssey offers up nine different endings, depending on the choices that the player makes over the course of the game.

Related: Every Assassin’s Creed Game Ranked

The story of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey isn’t exactly linear, with three core story arcs that intertwine over the course of the game. The roots of this plot lie in the family section of the story, which directly revolves around the player character (regardless of whether they choose Alexios or Kassandra), and it’s here where the end result of the player’s choices lies. However, it’s worth bearing in mind that those other threads of the story – those for the Cult of Kosmos and those that tie into the First Civilization of Assassin’s Creed lore – are also woven together here.

So, here’s a rundown of the choices players will have to make to make sure they’re left with the best outcome at the end of the game. Bear in mind that there are heavy spoilers for Assassin’s Creed Odyssey ahead.

During Chapter 2 of the game, the player meets their (adoptive) father Nikolaos, a Spartan general otherwise known as the Wolf of Sparta. Here, the player can kill Nikolaos for his part in nearly murdering the hero as a child, or spare his life. Sparing him is the option to choose here, as not only does it open up a quest line later in the game but it allows the best ending to still be available.

Next, during Chapter 6, players will need to make another choice – this time for their mother, Myrinne. Here, they will need to promise to save their sibling Deimos from the Cult of Kosmos to keep the happy ending possible.

The next few options revolve around Nikolaos again, in Chapter 7. During a conversation with Nikolaos, he must be convinced to intervene with Stentor, his adopted son, during the quest The Last Fight of Aristaios. Later in the same chapter, the player must keep Stentor alive when given the chance to kill him.

Next up is Chapter 8. Here, it’s extremely important to choose carefully during the conversation with Deimos in jail during Doing Time. The player has to convince them that they are being manipulated by the cult. Finally, in Chapter 9, the player must refuse to fight Deimos.

This will then result in the happiest ending in the game, with the family reunited. Of course, there are plenty of other endings available, depending on the choices the player makes, so stick to this route unless the player is after one of the different endings of the game.

More: Best Assassin’s Creed Odyssey Abilities to Unlock First



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2018-10-06 01:10:06 – Rob Gordon

Captain Marvel Trailer Gets 109 Million Views In First 24 Hours

The first trailer for Captain Marvel received about 109 million views worldwide in its first 24 hours of release. After years and years of waiting, Marvel Studios is finally going to put out their first female-led solo movie, starring Brie Larson as the eponymous superhero, which will be a transforming moment for the Marvel Cinematic Universe not only because of what the blockbuster movie represents but also because it opens up the shared universe to a host of new characters, stories, and worlds.

Furthermore, the Captain Marvel movie marks the first time that a Marvel Studios production will be co-directed by a female director. In this case, Anna Boden is helming the project alongside her longtime partner Ryan Fleck, and she is helping pave the way for Cate Shortland to take on the Black Widow solo movie on her own. Needless to say, comic book fans and general audiences alike are excited about the Captain Marvel movie – and they’re showing that excitement by seemingly watching the trailer over and over again.

Related: Chris Evans, Tessa Thompson & More React To Captain Marvel Movie Trailer

Following the release of the first Captain Marvel trailer yesterday morning, Marvel Studios has revealed that the trailer has amassed 109 million views from around the worldwide in its first 24 hours of release. It’s safe to assume that those views account for people watching the trailer across all social media platforms, such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. In the studio’s tweet, they quote the movie’s tagline – “Higher. Further. Faster.” – but that doesn’t necessarily apply to this situation.

Getting 109 million views in only 24 hours is nothing to laugh at, especially given that this is the studio’s first female-led solo movie, but it’s not the record-breaking number the studio may have been hoping for. Last year, the first trailer for Anthony and Joe Russos’ Avengers: Infinity War broke IT‘s record by accumulating a whopping 230 million views within 24 hours. As if that wasn’t enough, the blockbuster movie’s second trailer still managed to get 179 million views in 24 hours, thus becoming the third movie with the highest number of views during that initial period. Comparatively, in their first 24 hours, the first trailer for Taika Waititi’s Thor: Ragnarok got 136 million views and the second trailer for the Russos’ Captain America: Civil War got 94.7 million views.

It’s worth noting that the teaser trailer for Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther got 20 million fewer views than Captain Marvel, and look how that movie turned out; it earned more money at the domestic box office than Infinity War, which would’ve been unthinkable earlier this year. And it’s certainly possible that Captain Marvel will continue what Wonder Woman started and outgross most if not all other standalone superhero movies. If the movie’s trailer views are anything to go by, it’s on the right track.

More: Captain Marvel Trailer Breakdown: 33 Story Reveals & Secrets You Missed

Source: Marvel Studios





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2018-09-19 05:09:26 – Mansoor Mithaiwala