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Scream Resurrection Ending: Ghostface Killer Identity Revealed

Warning: Major spoilers for Scream: Resurrection!

Scream: Resurrection officially revealed which character was behind the Ghostface mask. The killer terrorized the members of the Deadfast Club for Scream‘s rebooted season 3. After the three-night event on VH1, the mystery of Ghostface’s identity is solved and all loose ends are now tied up.

After over a year-long delay in the production stage, Scream season 3 presented a new story about a group of unlikely allies who met during detention. Deion (RJ Cyler) was at the center of the drama as the main target of the Ghostface killer. To manipulate and torture Deion, his friends were often targeted by the maniac, some of which didn’t make it out alive.

Related: Scream Resurrection Cast & Character Guide

Despite being a horror series, Scream: Resurrection had many comedic moments and an ample amount of social commentary. It also played on horror cliches by going after tropes of the genre as a way to surprise viewers. As with all installments in the Scream movie franchise, the major question surrounded the identity of Ghostface. Here’s a breakdown of the killer character and the motivation behind the murders in Scream season 3.

The sixth and final episode of Scream season 3 revealed the identity of Ghostface and it was someone that most viewers didn’t expect. Beth (Giorgia Whigham), the goth and horror movie expert, turned out to be the face behind the infamous mask. She was a complete sociopath who wanted to be the star of her own real-life horror movie. Before Deion, Liv (Jessica Sula), and Kym (Keke Palmer) figured out her true identity, Beth managed to kill Shane (Tyler Posey), Manny (Giullian Yao Gioiello), and Amir (CJ Wallace). But she didn’t carry out the massacre on her own.

Jamal (Tyga), Deion’s half-brother, served as Beth’s accomplice throughout Scream: Resurrection. He met Beth at the tattoo parlor and the duo struck up a relationship after Jamal (who also goes by Jay) confided in her regarding his family troubles. It wasn’t difficult for Beth to convince Jay to join her plan. Jay actually wore the Ghostface mask at times so Beth could stay close to the Deadfast Club without generating suspicion. He was responsible for the deaths of TJ (Nash Grier), Avery (Patrick Johnson), Luther (Tony Todd), Latavious (DC Young Fly), and the attack on Officer Reynolds (Gideon Emery).

So what were the real motives behind Beth and Jay’s serial killer aspirations in Scream: Resurrection? Beth was basically waiting for her opportunity when Jay came along; it was clear from the beginning that Jay had issues with Deion and the history of their family. Jay’s father Earl (Diesel Madkins) left his mother after Marcus went missing to help with his secret family. This upset Jay’s mother so much that she ended up killing herself, forcing Earl to move his other son to Atlanta.

Related: Scream Season 3 Uses The Real Ghostface Mask: Here’s Why It Took So Long

Before Earl came clean about his other family, he introduced Jay to Deion. When Jay moved to Atlanta, he noticed that Deion acted like he was a complete stranger. Jay put the evidence together and realized that Deion was actually Marcus. After Beth turned on Jay, stabbing him and leaving him to die, Deion tried to save him. Jay then finally got his brother to come clean before he died from his injuries.

On that tragic Halloween night when Marcus disappeared, the twins switched costumes. Deion was actually the one who went missing in the salvage yard and later died. Nobody realized that the surviving twin was actually Marcus who took his brother’s identity. Marcus was the troubled twin and his family treated him differently so he kept it a secret his whole life. Jay was the only one who figured out the truth and he used it as his motivation to go after his half-brother. Not only did Marcus’ mistakes that Halloween night destroy Jay’s life, but it also cut the real Deion’s life short. That story helped give Beth the opportunity to carry out what she thought she was destined for – serial killer stardom. That was until Deion/Marcus, Liv, and Kym ended Beth’s reign of terror in Scream Resurrection.

Next: Scream 5 Updates: Will The Sequel Happen?


2019-07-10 08:07:37

Kara Hedash

New Green Arrow Identity Revealed

Arrow finally reveals season 7’s new Green Arrow – and it’s someone who’s much closer to Oliver Queen that viewers may realize. Since Oliver Queen has been imprisoned for most of Arrow season 7 so far, and only recently got out in order to make sure he’s ready to face whatever comes next in the Arrowverse‘s 2018 crossover event, Elseworlds, another Green Arrow has been helping keep Star City and its citizens safe in the interim. But, that’s led to more questions than it has answers.

Throughout Arrow season 7, the mystery of who the new Green Arrow was has split the remaining members of Team Arrow, as some of them believed one of other Team Arrow members was taking up Oliver’s mantle in secret – but that didn’t turn out to be the case. Then it was believed that Oliver’s son, William Queen, returned from the future and followed in his father’s footsteps as the Green Arrow, which made sense considering that Arrow season 7’s flashforwards are hinting at a dystopian future. However, it turns out that the new Green Arrow’s real identity is something not many people expected, but is nevertheless an exciting twist.

Related: Arrow: 9 Biggest Questions From The Season 7 Midseason Finale

In Arrow season 7 episode 8, “Unmasked,” it’s revealed that the new Green Arrow is Emiko Queen (played by Sea Shimooka on Arrow), Oliver Queen’s half-sister from the comics. While her name isn’t explicitly mentioned, it’s clear who she is, and that is evidenced by Arrow season 7’s midseason premiere originally being titled “My Name is Emiko Queen,” before ultimately being changed to “Shattered Lives” after the first title leaked online.

Considering where “Unmasked” left off, it’s safe to assume that Emiko Queen is Robert Queen’s daughter, and is therefore still Oliver’s half-sister. For those that are unaware, in the comics, Emiko Queen is the daughter of Robert Queen and Shado, though since there’s no indication that Shado is her mother in the Arrowverse, it’s possible that she may have an entirely different mother, which may be revealed when Arrow returns in 2019.

Furthermore, in the comics, the character Komodo was Emiko’s guardian (which is why she was well-trained in archery), so it’s possible that the only reason she’s appearing in the Arrowverse now (and as the new Green Arrow) is because she’s finally discovered who her real parents are, which is what led to her assuming her brother’s superhero identity while he was in prison. With Elseworlds now taking over Arrow’s final episode of 2018, any question about the new Green Arrow’s identity will have to wait until next year.

More: Arrow May Finally Deliver On The Show’s Suicide Squad Promise



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2018-12-03 06:12:11

Simon Pegg Interview: The Boys

Amazon’s upcoming comic book adaptation, The Boys, dropped some big news at New York Comic Con this week; not only did was the first clip from the show revealed, but so was the news that Simon Pegg would be appearing in it. The Boys is an adaptation of the Garth Ennis comic series of the same name, which satirizes the superhero world and imagines life in a universe where those with powers become corrupted by them – but maintain their public image.

The ‘Boys’ of the comic title are a group of vigilantes, mostly without superpowers, who take it upon themselves to keep tabs on the various ‘supes’ in this world – and occasionally, to take them down. The series follows Butcher (Karl Urban), his new protege Hughie (Jack Quaid), and the rest of their gang as they wreak havoc on the twisted supes that the world sees as heroes, and it promises to be violent, foul-mouthed, and hilariously dark. After the reveal that Pegg would be appearing in the show as Hughie’s father, we sat down to talk about what fans can expect from his new character on the show.

Related: The Boys TV Show Casts Simon Pegg As Hughie’s Father

SR: So, obviously this was a big reveal for The Boys today. Can we ask now how big your part in the show is?

Simon Pegg: I’m a guest role. I think I’m in a few episodes, and it was something that we really wanted to do from the off. When the show became a reality, they were very kind to get in contact when Jack was cast and say ‘maybe you can be in the show’. And I think I suggested that maybe I could play Hughie’s father or something.

SR: So it was your idea?

Simon Pegg: Well, I can’t remember, but I feel like I did say that! Whether or not they had already had the character in mind I’m not sure, because he certainly… he serves a real purpose in the show. He’s not in the comic book, but I think in the show he represents the possibility of Hughie not taking action. And the show begins with this terrible tragedy that happens to Hugie and he has two choices; he can stay on the sofa with Dad like every Campbell man has in the past, or he can actually change his life.

And so, as a sort of visual representation of Hughie’s possible destiny, the Dad works really well as a character.

SR: And do we see any of Hughie’s Mom?

Simon Pegg: No, she passed away, so it’s just Hughie and Dad, and they have a very sweet relationship. That picture that you saw of us, the family shot, is very much prior to A-Train doing what he does. They have a very sweet little… you know they are just father and son, and he’s still got his toys in his bedroom, and they live together, and Dad dotes on him. He’s a nice guy, he’s just very ineffectual.

SR: How do you feel about the fact that in the comics, obviously Hughie is Scottish and now we’re coming over to the US for this series? Are you going to be an English Dad or are you going to do the American accent?

Simon Pegg: Well, we talked about this, and I think what happened was initially I was going to play Hughie’s Dad as Scottish in reference to the comic book, but then we decided in a way that if Hughie was used to a British accent of any kind, it would make Butcher less alien to him, in a way. Because Butcher’s got to feel like he’s from a completely different world, you know, and so he has this rough Cockney accent, and so we thought ok, let’s make them American. So I play Hughie’s father as American.

SR: Which other character are you most excited about? Which one is your favorite, either in the comics or the show… is it the same one?

Simon Pegg: I was just really happy to see the Supes, you know! When I did my first scene it was quite early on in the shoot and not all of the Boys had actually arrived. I hadn’t met Karen [Fukahara] or anybody and I was kind of like, really wanting to see some superheroes. And then when I came back to shoot some more scenes later on I got to see A-Train, and pictures of the other ones, and it was just really great to see them in 3D! But the one that I saw that was a full on ‘there he is, right in front of me’ superhero was a real treat.

SR: Do you think that this show is going to be particularly appealing to people who are maybe getting a little of that so-called ‘superhero fatigue’?

Simon Pegg: Yeah, I think that in a weird way, as a satire on superheroism, that’s kind of the least of what this show is, in a way. It’s a broader satire about the notion of power and celebrity, and it just so happens that the subjects of that particular analysis are superheroes in this show. We do, obviously, satirize superhero culture a little bit, and people might enjoy the parallels to other known superheroes that The Boys delights in. But at the same time, you know, it’s still a superhero show, I think it’s just a welcome change of tone, for sure. But it’s not like, I don’t think it’s sneering at its roots in any way. In the great tradition of comics like The Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, it’s kind of a slightly skewed version of that world, no less reverent.

SR: And other than yourself, because obviously your character doesn’t exist in the comics, were there any other major changes that surprised you, going in as a fan? At least, I am assuming you are a fan!

Simon Pegg: I am, yes! Everything that I saw, I really really liked, and I appreciate the importance, when making an adaptation, of not being too slavish. You can tie yourself in knots by being desperate to please, and I think that the best thing you can do with a story that first appeared in 2008 sis to make sure that it feels relevant in 2018. So they’ve done everything they can to do that. So the changes that I saw felt completely in keeping with the spirit of the comic book, and I know that’s what Garth Ennis really wanted as well, and Darick Robertson (the artist). And so as long as they maintain the kind of mission statement of it I’m happy to see it change. It must change, in the same way that The Walking Dead as a comic book is very different to the series, but it still has its own personality. TV is a different medium, you know, and it should have its own identity.

SR: And finally, I think we have time for one more, so given that you know the works of Garth Ennis, would you think that The Pro would be an interesting thing to be adapted next? And would you like to appear in that one, if it did?

Simon Pegg: [LAUGHS] I think anything he does is always… I think Garth kind of writes specifically to try and challenge people not to adapt… as if to say ‘alright, adapt that then!’. You know, things that just seem completely unadaptable. So, yes, I would always be happy to be involved in anything that Garth does, I’ve been a fan a long time, so yeah.

And, now they’ve done Preacher and now this, I think it’s paved the way for pretty much anything he does to appear in some form, you know, however mental. I shouldn’t say that, it’s the wrong word to say.

SR: Well, it’s a very British word.

Simon Pegg: [CHUCKLES] Yeah. So – who knows, you might have started a rumor – this is how these things start!

Next: Everything We Know About Preacher Season 4

The Boys is expected to premiere on Amazon in early 2019.



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2018-10-10 01:10:06 – Rose Moore

20 Storylines Shameless Wants Everyone To Forget

With the announcement that Emmy Rossum and Cameron Monaghan will leave the series following the ninth season of Shameless, the Gallagher household is prepping for a major shake-up on the casting front. The creator of the Showtime series John Wells has remained open about a future Fiona return, though he has also stated that there are many more dysfunctional tales left to be told for the Gallagher clan.

For eight seasons, Shameless has remained consistent in the deplorable decision-making skills of its characters, though the series’ depiction of a low-income family living below the poverty line has always been at the forefront. As the strong matriarch who single-handedly raised her siblings while her father wasn’t around, Fiona’s absence is sure to shift more focus towards the show’s younger stars as writers hope fans will soon forget her. Ian’s storyline in season 9 drove much of the action, so Monaghan’s exit will surely leave a whole as well.

Whether they’re dealing with the changing gentrification of their community or watching as another beloved character takes their leave, the Gallaghers have proven time and again that they can adapt better than anyone. From the show’s debut back in 2011 until now, the stars of the series have been forced to mature, sometimes faster than they wanted to. Along the way, there have been many entertaining or even head-scratching subplots which have since been left behind. Although the changes are nothing new to the Gallaghers, they have left many questions up in the air for fans.

Join us as we take a look back at 20 Storylines Shameless Wants Everyone to Forget.

20 Frank and Bianca

After Sammi shoots Frank in the arm to teach him a valuable lesson about courtesy, she forces him to visit the hospital to have his wound checked. During his stay, he begins bonding with his distraught doctor Bianca, whose diagnosis of stage three pancreatic cancer has left her with a new lease on life. Attempting to persuade her to live life to the fullest, Frank offers to teach her how to live carelessly, which includes a copious amount of substance abuse.

Although Frank’s time with Bianca was intended as a heart-wrenching moment which left him reeling the following season, it was never clear why the successful, young doctor would choose to spend her remaining days with him. With her money, she could seemingly spend her days anywhere. There’s little reason to believe Frank would appear as an enticing option.

19 Lip’s Sports Gambling Internship

With an exceptionally high IQ, Lip isn’t the standard member of the Gallagher household, though his self-sabotaging personality has prevented him from achieving a legitimate career. Accepted into the University of Chicago, he threw away his future after an assault on a campus guard led to his expulsion. Following a stint in rehab, Lip secured an internship with a tech start-up, thanks to his friend, Professor Youens.  Soon, however, he discovered the truth behind the company. His co-workers were using proxy servers to hide illegal sports gambling activities.

Although the crooked start-up appeared as a perfect match, nothing would come of it.

He temporarily used a wire fraud scheme to steal cash from the company, but in due time, the start-up went under and Lip was left without a career goal once again.

18 Kevin Discovers His Kentucky Heritage

Season eight concluded with a strange hodgepodge of storylines for Kevin, which included a search for self-identity as he tracked down his biological parents and found himself in Kentucky. Once he arrived, he was introduced to Aunt Ronnie and the rest of the family, immediately settling in and recalling his past as Little Barty. Unfortunately, V immediately sensed something wrong about the group, apart from their offhanded racist remarks.

As a small child, the low-income family struggled to properly raise Kev, resorting to abandoning him at a roadside gas station. He eventually learned to accept his heritage, although he seemed to quickly forget all about it soon after. Kev would have other moments of a self-identity crisis in season eight, including exploring his possible attraction to men, but his Kentucky lineage would ultimately become an afterthought.

17 Fiona Marries Gus, Then Immediately Cheats on Him

Speaking of his character on Shameless, star Steve Kazee said Fiona’s former husband Gus Pfender “got a really raw deal” over the way his storyline ended. After meeting the eldest Gallagher sibling, the two went from strangers to married seemingly overnight.

When Jimmy’s return visit catches Fiona off guard, she’s faced with an ultimatum.

Either run away with Jimmy or stay with Gus, whom she’s known for a few days. Her reaction is to throw away her newfound relationship for the temptation of her ex-boyfriend. She cheats on Gus then immediately regrets it, but by then it’s too late. Her marriage to Gus is over and any remnants of it are completely forgotten by the writing staff.

16 Debbie Steals a Baby

Before Debbie was doing crazy things like stealing expensive baby strollers to support Frances or having Liam amputate her toes to avoid undergoing a pricey surgery on her crushed foot, she was just a lonely girl looking for a playmate.

In the episode “Casey Casden”, Debbie grows tired of playing with a sack of potatoes decorated to look like a baby.

Rather than asking for a new doll, she takes matters into her own hands when she lures a three year old boy back to the Gallagher residence. The Gallaghers then spend the episode concocting a plan to call in false sightings of the child with the cops finally finding him with Debbie, who acts like she found him wandering around Chicago. Needless to say, it was a crazy storyline that the show’s producers haven’t attempted since.

15 Anything Involving Sammi or Chuckie

Frank’s estranged daughter Sammi is first introduced in season four after Frank discovers his liver in failing. Posing as a Good Samaritan, he begins dating her to grow closer before dropping the devastating bombshell. Oddly enough, however, she’s not disgusted at all by the news and even embraces her new father figure, despite his countless shortcomings.

By season five, Sammi has acquainted herself enough with the Gallaghers to move into the household, though she was never invited. When her son Chuckie is later arrested and sent to juvenile detention for possession, she blames Carl, later ratting him out to the authorities. As a result, a dispute breaks out which ends with Mickey locking her inside a shipping container and Sammi later shooting at him, presumably leading to her arrest and the end of her story.

14 Fiona Cheats on Mike with His Brother

With her recent investments in Patsy’s Pies as well as a laundromat and an apartment complex, Fiona’s newfound entrepreneurial spirit has only recent become a central part of her storyline. Prior to becoming a property owner, she was a down on her luck South Side girl who constantly found herself in failing relationships.

In season four, Fiona’s downward spiral of relationships hit another low.

She was in desperate need of a rebound following Jimmy’s disappearance. After securing a job at Worldwide Cup, she began having a fling with her boss Mike. When Mike’s brother Robbie comes into the picture after his release from rehab, Fiona’s attraction to danger takes ahold. Putting her career in jeopardy, she has an unwise affair which culminates in her arrest at the end of the season.

13 Frank Uses Liam as Collateral

Scouring Chicago for enough money to support his many dirty habits, Frank has attracted the attentions of enough bad guys that it’s a miracle that he’s manage to run around carelessly for so long. In the season two premiere, he again backed himself into a corner when he drunkenly bet a bar patron at the Alibi Room that he couldn’t remain conscious after two taser blasts. After the customer manages to remain on two feet, Frank’s $10,000 gamble comes at the expense of the Gallagher household.

Unable to come up with the dough, the patron threatens Frank with a blowtorch, to which he responds by offering up Liam as collateral. Luckily, the Gallagher clan rallies together to get him back. Frank would later develop a bonding relationship with his youngest son, completely erasing all memory of the incident.

12 Kevin and Veronica’s Foster Child

With twins Amy and Jemma, Kevin and Veronica finally settled down to have children of their own after V became pregnant in season four. Prior to having their own kids, the couple were experimenting with parenthood in the form of a money scheme which saw them taking in a foster child in order to collect money from the government.

In season one, Kev and V welcome Ethel, a teen saved from a polygamist colony where she was married to an elderly man named Clyde.

They also took in Ethel’s son Jonah, who was born as a result of the marriage. Over the course of her stay, she struggles to grow accustomed to the modern world, but eventually settles in, until she runs away with her boyfriend Malik in season two, disappearing forever.

11 Anything Involving Sheila

Remember Sheila? The agoraphobic housewife with a proclivity for cooking was a former love interest of Frank’s, who welcomed him into her home to take advantage of her disability checks. For five seasons, she played the picture-perfect example of a housewife, though her repressed emotions would occasionally rear their ugly head.

Throughout the series, Joan Cusack would receive considerable acclaim for her turn as the wacky, subservient Sheila, earning an Emmy nomination for each season she appeared in. Although she would never receive more than a guest credit, her most memorable storylines would include dealing with her troubled daughter Karen, having an affair with Karen’s boyfriend Jody, and marrying Frank. Her storyline came to a rather abrupt end after her house exploded in season five, resulting in her driving off in an RV, never to be seen again.

10 Frank Hires a Hitman

Always the deadbeat father, Frank experienced a slight morality check when he wasn’t invited toFiona’s wedding to Sean in season six. As a way to make up for all his shortcomings, he offered to pay for all of Fiona’s wedding expenses. Everything came to a head, however, when Sean began sleeping over at the Gallagher residence, resulting in a brutal confrontation between Fiona’s fiance and the lousy patriarch of the household. After days of Frank wearing Sean’s underwear and drinking his milk, Sean’s frustration boiled over, resulting in a fight between the two.

Frank is seen on a train attempting to pay a random guy to dispose of Sean permanently.

Although nothing would come of the exchange, the attempted assassination was out of the ordinary, even for the lowly Frank.

9 Debbie Purposely Gets Pregnant

The third youngest Gallagher, Debbie began the series as the well-intention, younger sister who still held high hopes for Frank and cared for her family, though she often found it difficult to socialize in school. In due time, she transformed from the innocent girl wise beyond her years to one of the most troublesome characters on the show, using her hardened attitude to deceive her way to whatever she desired.

In season five, Debbie’s manipulative personality crossed a line when she became enamored with Derek, a boy who taught her how to box. Wanting a perfect life with her newfound boyfriend, she purposely lies to him about being on birth control in order to become pregnant and force him into a marriage. Unfortunately, her plans fall through when Derek leaves to live with his grandmother, leaving Debs a single mother.

8 Frank Tells Carl He Has Cancer

As the delinquent troublemaker whose interests include weapons, explosives, and various money-making schemes, Carl has proven to be the most like his dear deadbeat father Frank. As a faithful member of the Gallagher family, he’s the unfortunate product of a dysfunctional upbringing, but none of his regrettable actions were deserving of the scare Frank gave him in season five.

After seeing a cancer patient receive an autographed Bulls basketball on television, Frank decides to extort the Make-A-Wish Foundation by giving them a sob story.

Shaving Carl’s head, he convinces him that he has cancer and tries to get him an autographed basketball of his own, that he can later sell for a profit. Instead, Carl is offered a free summer away at a camp for cancer patients, ruining Frank’s plans and giving Carl his own mini vacation.

7 Carl Marries Kassidi

As a way of coming up with enough cash for military school in season eight, Carl sets up his own rehabilitation center in the basement of the Gallagher home, hosting neighborhood addicts for days of withdrawal. It’s here where he first encounters Kassidi, a seemingly sociopathic teen who concocts a plan to extort money from her rich father to pay Carl’s expenses.

Soon after sparking a relationship, Kassidi’s wildly chaotic personality begins threatening Carl’s career goals. As she wanders about Chicago’s South Side doing things like Snapchatting drive-by shooting victims, Carl becomes more wary of her actions, which makes it all the more confusing that he marries her at the end of the season. The season nine premiere seems to have ended her story, however, as the character’s recent disappearance suggests that she may now be deceased.

6 Mandy Hurts Karen

As the manipulative former girlfriend of Lip, Karen was the incessantly rude daughter of the agoraphobic Sheila, who would go to extreme lengths to get her way. After she stops seeing Lip due to her marriage to Jody as well as the birth of her down syndrome son Hymie, Karen decides to start things back up with her former lover, only for Lip rejects her for Mandy.

After brazenly attempting to meddle with Lip and Mandy’s relationship, Karen receives a rude awakening when she receives a text from Lip, which is later revealed to be Mandy using Lip’s phone. Showing up to a park to meet, Karen is struck by an SUV driven by Mandy, leaving her permanently brain damaged, effectively ending her story on the series.

5 Frank Has a Twin Brother

With so many siblings running around and Frank constantly inviting himself in with his various trouble-making shenanigans, it’s impossible for the Gallaghers to keep track of everyone’s comings and goings. That’s why the existence of more Gallaghers seems completely absurd, but as the early seasons have shown, there are more family members out there.

Of all the odd Gallagher members forgotten from the early seasons, none were crazier than Jerry, Frank’s twin brother.

Ian and Lip visit Jery after their grandmother Peggy claims he owes the family $5,000. Looking just like Frank, he threatens to shoot his nephews shortly after realizing they’re after money. Since his appearance, little mention has been made of Frank’s twin or of Frank’s other siblings Clayton and Wyatt.

4 Jimmy’s Return

First appearing as Fiona’s love interest in season one, Jimmy introduced himself to the Gallagher household as Steve, a hotshot businessman who comes from money. Soon afterward, his real personality begins to shine through as Fiona discovers that he makes his money through various illegal activities. In due time, he gets engaged to the daughter of a crime lord, which leads to his supposed demise in the season three finale.

Jimmy returns at the end of season four, becoming a recurring cast member for a brief time.

In an attempt to flatter Fiona, he tries to persuade her to leave her husband Gus for him. Although his return answered questions about his fate, it still left his future up in the air, leaving many to believe his story should have ended with the season three cliffhanger.

3 Frank Lies to Butterface About Her Heart Transplant

Of all the lowdown plans Frank has concocted, perhaps nothing is more despicable than the time he began hanging out with Dottie, a former good-time girl with a heart condition. Nicknamed Butterface for her less than stellar looks, Frank discovers that Dottie is in serious need of a heart transplant, rewarding him the opportunity to weasel his way into her good graces and work his way into her will before she passes away.

Although Frank’s decision proves to be flawed, he fully commits to the scheme. While Dottie is in the shower, she gets a phone call telling her a new heart has arrived which could save her life, only Frank decides to tell the hospital that Dottie has already passed away. Later, Dottie loses her life during an intimate moment with Frank, making his actions even more awful.

2 Kev has a Baby with Veronica’s Mother

As the Gallaghers’ longtime friends, Kevin and Veronica are often the supporting comic relief of the series, though they have also proven to be the strongest lasting couple. In season three, after repeatedly failing to have a baby, V enlists her bubbly mother Carol to act as a surrogate. When Carol also fails to become pregnant, Veronica to suggests her mom and Kevin actually get intimate with each other to possibly improve their results.

In due time, Carol warms up to the idea, becoming pregnant with Kevin’s child. By happenstance, Veronica soon discovers that she too is pregnant, with twins. Nine months later, the couple are the proud parents to three newborns, only Carol decides to single-handedly raise her child on her own. After a few brief appearances, Kevin and Carol’s child is forgotten and never shown again.

1 Everything Positive About Ian and Mickey’s Relationship

As a violent street thug, Mickey Milkovich is the antithesis of the gay stereotype. Ian, whose storied history with Mickey makes up a large portion of his story in the early seasons, is the more sensitive of the couple, but his rebellious nature and struggles with bipolar disorder make him an equally multi-dimensional character.

As one of the best-written gay relationships on television in recent memory, Ian and Mickey’s story was at times chaotic. 

After his imprisonment at the end of season five, Mikey escaped from prison and fled to Mexico, tearfully leaving Ian behind. Since then, the positives of their relationship have been largely dismissed and Mickey’s absence has left a void on the show which has yet to be filled.

What other storylines does Shameless want to bury? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-09 03:10:17 – Turner Minton

James Gunn Is A Better Fit For Suicide Squad Than Guardians of the Galaxy

Controversial writer and director James Gunn is perfectly suited for Suicide Squad 2; in fact, it’s a far better fit for him than Guardians of the Galaxy ever was. Gunn certainly has form transforming a band of misfits into a superhero family/team, and Suicide Squad 2 should give him the ideal opportunity to demonstrate his skills yet again, although the story goes a little deeper than that.

Gunn’s career with Disney came to a shocking end back in July, when some of his old social media posts went viral. Gunn had fancied himself as something of a provocateur prior to working for Disney, and these posts included off-key jokes on everything from rape to pedophilia. Disney responded by swiftly firing him from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3. Within a month, there were reports that Gunn had been approached by Disney’s rival Warner Bros. potentially with the option of producing a DC superhero movie.

Related: Why Rehiring James Gunn Was Harder For Disney Than Fans Realize

DC Films has expressed interest in Gunn before. Back in 2016, he admitted that he’d “had opportunities to make DC films,” but had turned them down; he reeled off a list of heroes he’d quite enjoy tackling, ranging from Swamp Thing to Jonah Hex, from the Metal Men to Shazam. Now, though, there have been reports that Gunn is on board to write, and possibly even direct, Suicide Squad 2.

  • This Page: Why James Gunn Is Perfect For Suicide Squad 2
  • Next Page: Why This Is A Better Fit Than Guardians of the Galaxy

Why James Gunn Is Perfect For Suicide Squad 2

It’s not hard to see what Warner Bros. want James Gunn on board. He’s a writer and director with a proven history of turning even the most unlikely franchises into box office hits. Back when Marvel Studios announced the first Guardians of the Galaxy film, everybody assumed this would be their first misstep; the Guardians had a low profile even among comic book fans, and their members including a walking tree and a talking raccoon. A series of tremendously effective trailers immediately changed that, and the movie grossed $773 million worldwide. Not bad for a bunch of “a**-holes.

Ironically, David Ayer’s Suicide Squad suffered as a result of Guardians of the Galaxy‘s success. Warner Bros. attempted to make their dark movie fit Gunn’s tone, with the trailers showing a strong Guardians of the Galaxy vibe. Viewers responded well to the trailers, and as a result there are reports Warner Bros. lost faith in Ayer’s approach, attempting to make the franchise as Guardians-like as possible. The result was a strange hybrid of a finished production, critically panned, which nevertheless managed to gross $747 million worldwide off the back of its strong marketing campaign. A sequel was always on the cards, but nobody was quite sure who could make it work. So why not bring in the man who made Guardians of the Galaxy work in the first place?

Suicide Squad 2 Matches James Gunn’s Earlier Movies

It’s important not to assume Suicide Squad 2 would just be a rehash of Guardians of the Galaxy, though. In truth, the comic book franchise is tonally similar to some of Gunn’s earlier works, most notably Super. This was a black comedy-drama centered around the character of Frank Darbo, a cook who took up the identity of the “Crimson Bolt” in order to rescue his wife from a drug dealer. Although critics weren’t impressed by the movie, it built a strong fanbase and put Gunn on Disney’s radar. Super rejoices in its confusing characters, who are filled to the brim with flaws and conflicting character traits – and gore ready to be spilled. Frank, for example, was a religious pacifist who made the world a better place through merciless violence. It was only after he began hearing warped messages “from God” that he began to understand the real world at all.

Related: Disney’s Decision On James Gunn Will Define The MCU

This is just the kind of crazy, conflicted approach that would work so well for Suicide Squad 2. After all, this is a team who are defined by their contradiction. They’re a group of super-villains who are forced to save the world; they deeply resent the fact they’re being forced to work together, and yet somehow consider one another a family. The best Suicide Squad stories are a blend of light and dark, tinged with anger and joy, betrayal and redemption.

And the characters in Suicide Squad are so very three-dimensional. Take Harley Quinn; although it didn’t quite make it through to David Ayer’s film, at heart she’s an abuse victim who’s struggling to find herself, and the relationship between Harley and the Joker is most definitely not intended to be some sort of “relationship goal“. Killer Croc is a brutal murderer who eats his foes, and yet develops such a fondness for his team-mates that he becomes dangerously protective of them. Boomerang wants to live a life of crime, and yet vaguely enjoys the idea he’s achieving something when he saves the world. These “villains” are three-dimensional in a way few superheroes are, with aspects of their own natures in direct conflict, pulling them this way and that. They’re every bit as mercurial and inconsistent as real people. And they’re just the kind of characters James Gunn has a form for developing, back in his pre-Guardians of the Galaxy days.

Page 2 of 2: Why This Is A Better Fit Than Guardians of the Galaxy

James Gunn Made Great Guardians of the Galaxy Movies – But He Changed Them To Do So

The truth is that, although James Gunn made tremendous Guardians of the Galaxy movies, he did so by taking major liberties with the comic canon. Gunn took the most basic concept underlying the franchise, and then made his own version of it. Gunn’s genius was that he saw the potential, he realized why it wouldn’t connect with audiences, and then he made it work. Even the tone and style of the Guardians movies was nothing like the original comics, which had typically gone for cosmic melodrama rather than ’80s nostalgia.

Characters, too, were completely rewritten in order to become the versions Gunn needed. Take Peter Quill as the classic example. Steve Englehart created the character back in 1976, and he described the original Star-Lord as “an unpleasant, introverted jerk.” Englehart planned to develop him into the most cosmic hero ever, but left Marvel before he’d even begun that character arc. As a result, the comic book version remained in that pattern, although he gradually transformed into a leader. James Gunn looked at the comic character, and decided to completely rework him. Star-Lord remained something of a jerk, but he was much more charismatic and extroverted; a revised origin explained that he was a child who’d run away from home after his mother’s death, and had never really grown up as a result. It made Quill a deeply empathetic character, viewed with affection in spite of his many flaws.

Related: Avengers Fans Are Being Too Hard On Star-Lord

Comic book readers traditionally complain when movies diverge from the comic book canon they grew up reading. In the case of Guardians of the Galaxy, though, James Gunn made his changes work so well that precious few objected. Marvel Comics, inspired by the surprise box office success of a previously-third-tier superhero franchise, quickly redesigned their own characters to align with Gunn’s versions. In the case of Peter Quill, they even retconned some of his previous appearances to say they’d taken place in another reality. Gunn won’t need to go the same lengths to make Suicide Squad 2 his own. As we’ve already pointed out, the characters are tailor-made for Gunn’s kind of character-work, and the themes and concepts that run through the comics fit perfectly with the kind of ideas he likes to work with.

Meanwhile, Gunn’s looser approach to canon and continuity will flourish in the DCEU. Although most viewers hadn’t picked up on it, Gunn’s maverick attitude towards continuity was never perfectly suited to the tighter, more intensely-scrutinized MCU; occasionally there were signs Gunn felt the pressure of it, and indeed rebelled against it. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 rendered a tie-in comic non-canon, for example, and Gunn admitted he contemplated breaking his own personal canon for the third film. “Marvel Canon – MCU – is crazy,” Gunn admitted. “I have a really good storytelling reason for breaking the canon, and I stayed up last night figuring out if I’m gonna do it or not. I still don’t know.” Given the complexity of the MCU and the degree to which fans take note of every detail, sooner or later that would have caused problems. Warner Bros., however, won’t particularly care; their view of continuity is very much that it should serve the director. That will give Gunn all the flexibility he needs to tell the best stories he can.

The latest reports confirm that James Gunn is on board as the writer of Suicide Squad 2, and he should breathe new life into the project. It remains to be seen whether or not Gunn will go on to become director as well; if he does, then he’d definitely be an effective choice, and the film would surely be guaranteed a success.

More: All 26 Upcoming & In-Development DC Films



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2018-10-09 03:10:13 – Thomas Bacon

All The Spider-Villain Movies Coming After Venom

Venom is the first Sony-Marvel film in a planned Spider-Man villain universe – and there’s a lot more on the way. If all goes well for Sony then Venom, in theaters this weekend, will set the ball rolling for a darker version of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Once The Walt Disney Company’s acquisition of 20th Century Fox is complete, the world of Peter Parker and friends will be the only major segment of the Marvel canon not exclusively under their control. And, although Spider-Man is already part of the MCU, Sony has high hopes for creating their own franchise that can both stand on its own two feet (albeit with the possibility of tying it into the MCU down the line). Spider-Man remains one of the most iconic characters in comic book lore, and his most infamous foes are equally as popular with audiences thanks to the cartoon series and Sam Raimi trilogy.

Related: Is Venom In The MCU? Marvel/Spider-Man Movie Rights & Shared Universes Explained

Their current plans, which are reportedly being referred to internally as Sony’s Universe of Marvel Characters, or SUMC for short, involve expanding the world of the Spidey villains into their own saga. Venom, the human-symbiote who has become one of the series’ most beloved anti-heroes, is only the starting point in these plans. Sony has a whole host of other Spider-villain movies planned. Here are the titles that are either in pre-production or are currently part of the studio’s Spider-verse strategy.

  • This Page: Sony’s Confirmed Spider-Man Villain Films
  • Page 2: Spider-Man Villain Films Sony Has In Early Development

Morbius, the Living Vampire Is The Next Spider-Man Villain Movie

In an unexpected step, Sony has confirmed that the first film to follow Venom would be one centered on Morbius, the Living Vampire, and that the lead role would be played by Jared Leto. The character was created in the 1970s when the Comics Code Authority, the industry’s censorship board, lifted its ban on depictions of vampires and the supernatural. His true identity is that of Michael Morbius, a biochemist whose experiment to cure his rare blood disorder goes awry and gifts him with vampiric abilities.

The Morbius film will be directed by Life‘s Daniel Espinosa, based on a script by Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless (writers of Gods of Egypt). on screenwriting duties. Morbius is also one of the favorite comic book characters of Avi Arad, who told Screen Rant at a Venom press junket:

We are excited about Morbius. Morbius was always one of my favorite characters. I love the story about the healer that becomes a killer, and how do you deal with it.

Audiences may get Morbius sooner than expected; Sony was last said to be eyeing a November start to production, making a 2019 release possible.

Read More: Morbius the Living Vampire: Who Is He, and What Are His Powers?

Venom 2 Is Likely Going To Happen

WARNING: Spoilers for Venom in this entry.

While we still have to wait for news of Venom’s success before sequel talk begins at Sony for real, it’s clear from the film itself that the studio is eager to establish follow-up films. In one of the two end-credit scenes, Eddie goes to San Quentin prison to interview a prisoner and comes face to face with serial killer Cletus Kasady, a.k.a. Carnage. The part is played by Woody Harrelson, who had previously worked with director Ruben Fleischer on Zombieland.

Like Eddie and Venom, Kasady becomes a host for the Carnage symbiote and proves to be far more powerful and deadly than Venom; in the comics, Carnage leads to Venom teaming up with Spider-Man to take on his uncontrollable rage. Introducing Carnage to their Spider-Man universe would be a strong way for Sony to bring Peter Parker together with Eddie Brock, or otherwise make him more of a hero in his own right.

Silver Sable & Black Cat Are Getting Individual Movies

Originally, Sony had announced plans for a Silver Sable and Black Cat team-up movie, to be titled Silver and Black and released in February 2019. Gina Prince-Bythewood, director of Love and Basketball as well as the pilot for Cloak and Dagger, was attached to helm the project. Now, the two characters will be given their own films and Prince-Bythewood is no longer directing, although she will still receive a producer credit.

Silver Sable (real name Silver Sablinova) is a mercenary and leader of the Wild Pack, a title she inherited from her father, who ran a Nazi-hunting team. Given the character’s roots as a Nazi hunter, it would be difficult for Sony to overlook this crucial part of her backstory. However, it could also open up many storytelling possibilities. Sony are hoping to bring on another female director for the project, but other than that, little else is known about production.

Felicia Hardy, the infamous cat burglar with the ability to produce bad luck in her enemies, is one of Spider-Man’s most popular adversaries as well as a collaborator and on-again, off-again romantic interest. Felicia was previously played by Felicity Jones in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, where she served as Harry Osborn’s assistant, but none of her extra-curricular activities fit into the stuffed movie. Black Cat will reportedly be a re-worked version of the Silver & Black script and Prince-Bythewood will remain a producer.

Page 2: Spider-Man Villain Films Sony Has In Early Development

Spike Lee Was Reportedly In Talks For Nightwatch

While no other films have gone as far in development, Sony has several other Spider-Man villain films in the works. Earlier this year, it was reported that Spike Lee had been in talks to direct a Nightwatch film, with a potential script from Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker, although both Sony and Lee declined to comment.

Doctor Kevin Trench watched a costumed man die while battling terrorists armed with invisibility devices. When he unmasked the dead men, he was shocked to realize that it was an older version of himself. Afraid for what this meant for his future, he stole the costume and fled to a deserted island in the hopes that, if he just never wore the suit, he could avoid his own death. In more recent comics, including She-Hulk, Trench is portrayed as a wealthy philanthropist who secretly spent most of his career as a supervillain and retconned everyone’s memories of his nefarious past.

Kraven The Hunter Has A Script From The Equalizer’s Writer

One character who’s long been eyed for a solo movie is Kraven the Hunter. A Spider-Man villain who’s been rumored for inclusion in movies for years – including the MCU side – it now looks like he could be getting a solo movie at Sony. In August, it was reported that a Kraven script was being written by The Equalizer‘s Richard Wenk, although there’s been no talk of the project since then.

Kraven is one of Spider-Man’s well-known villains, remembered best for the Kraven’s Last Hunt arc which saw him travel to New York in a bid to hunt down and kill Spider-Man, then taking over as a more brutalized version. An involving story, it’s one that would definitely lend itself well to a big screen adaptation.

Read More: Who Kraven Can Hunt In His Movie Instead Of Spider-Man

Jackpot & Silk Have Movies In Development

A couple of other movies have been reported recently. First there’s Jackpot, a more recent addition to the Spider-verse, created by Dan Slott and Phil Jimenez, who only got her own mini-series in 2010. The character also has two aliases: Sara Ehret, a scientist who accidentally gives herself superhuman strength; and Alana Jacobson, who uses performance-enhancing drugs like Mutant Growth Hormone to mimic Jackpot’s powers. A Jackpot movie could open new ground for Sony and the superhero genre: Sara is a 40-something woman with a daughter while Alana is a lesbian, which could bring some much-needed diversity to the field.

There’s also Korean-American superhero Cindy Moon, a.k.a. Silk. Cindy first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #1 in April 2014. Her own powers, similar to Spider-Man’s, manifested when the same radioactive spider bit her after biting Peter Parker. Unlike Peter, Silk has the ability to create organic webbing, something she has trouble controlling. She is later approached by businessman Ezekiel Sims, who offers to guide her in her newfound abilities. Cindy briefly appears in Spider-Man: Homecoming as a classmate of Peters and is portrayed by Tiffany Espensen, although the in-development Silk movie is more likely to recast.

Next: Sony’s Marvel Universe May Already Have A Spider-Man Replacement



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2018-10-08 03:10:27 – Kayleigh Donaldson

Arrow Season 7 Trailer Introduces New Villains The Longbow Hunters

A new trailer for The CW’s Arrow reveals the Longbow Hunters, a group of villains devoted to the cause of hunting downing Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell). It appears that the group will be lead by the main antagonist of season 6, Ricardo Diaz (Kirk Acevedo). At SDCC 2018, it was confirmed that the Longbow Hunters would be appearing in season 7.

Arrow season 6 ended with Oliver Queen taking extreme measures in his efforts to defeat Diaz and save Star City. In exchange for the FBI’s help, Oliver had to turn himself in and give up his secret identity. Oliver was sent to a supermax prison, where he will encounter enemies from his past. While Oliver takes a beating behind bars, members of Team Arrow may have problems of their own, considering that Diaz is still on the loose.

Related: Elseworlds: Everything You Need To Know About The Arrowverse Crossover

The CW has released a new trailer for Arrow that previews what Oliver will go through in prison, the return of Diaz, and what the former members of Team Arrow have been doing since Oliver’s incarceration. Perhaps most importantly, though, the trailer also introduces the Longbow Hunters, a team of villains that was teased in the season 6 finale.

The trailer reveals the shield-carrying Kodiak (Michael Jonsson), Red Dart (Holly Elissa), and The Silencer (Miranda Edwards). All three seem to be working either for or with Diaz, who apparently hasn’t given up on his plans to eliminate Team Arrow, since the trailer shows him taking shots at René (Rick Gonzalez). In the SDCC 2018 trailer, Diaz vowed to go after everyone Oliver cares about.

As each member of the group has their own unique skill set, the four could prove to be dangerous adversaries for Oliver and his former allies. It’s possible that it will be their actions that forces Oliver to escape prison and return to his role as the Green Arrow. In season 6, Diaz was dangerous enough all on his own, so being surrounded by equally capable villains could provide him with a huge advantage.

Though the three new characters all originate from the comic books, it’s unclear why any of them would want to target Oliver. The Silencer, however, has ties to Talia al Ghul, which means that Arrow‘s version could be a former member of the League of Assassins looking to avenge Ra’s al Ghul. All three could have their own motivations for hunting Oliver, which may be revealed in the coming episodes.

More: Arrow Season 7 Casts Shadowhunters Alum In ‘Pivotal’ Role

Arrow season 7 premieres Monday, October 15, on The CW.

Source: The CW





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2018-10-08 02:10:06 – Nicholas Raymond

A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad (And Always Has Been)

WARNING: Major spoilers for A Star Is Born

A Star Is Born‘s ending undoes what could have been a Hollywood classic – but that’s not exactly Bradley Cooper’s fault. From its first version in 1937, A Star Is Born has always had a problematic resolution to its story, one that’s only got worse over the past century, and this latest version is no different.

A Star Is Born is a classic story that Hollywood loves so much it’s told it four times (with a suspiciously-similar earlier version, several failed attempts and many, many imitators). A top-of-his-game star (in 2018, Bradley Cooper’s rock star Jackson Maine) is suffering from alcoholism and in a stupor discovers a struggling artist (Lady Gaga as Ally, a waitress moonlighting in a drag bar), falling in love with both her and her talent. He provides her with a big break, sending her fame into the stratosphere just as his addictions begin to derail his career. The pair marry, but despite their love things begin to fray.

Related: Read Our A Star Is Born Review

It’s a tale of rags to riches, of falls from grace, of the power of love, and personal identity within all of that. And, for much of the runtime, A Star Is Born 2018 is genuinely a great version of all those stories. Gaga’s first major concert leaves you floating, Cooper shows mental affliction with grace, both perform their songs incredibly (to actual live crowds, no less), and are utterly believable as troubled lovers. It is, for much of its runtime, a very good film worthy of that deafening hype.

However, everything implodes into a black hole of pretentiousness as what could have been a great film its own right has to follow through on being called A Star Is Born

  • This Page: The Problem With A Star Is Born’s Ending
  • Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad
  • Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

What Happens In A Star Is Born’s Ending

We’ll stick with Cooper’s take for now before going deeper into the past. A Star Is Born‘s third act is kicked off by Ally winning the Grammy for Best New Artist – a major step for her career, undercut entirely by Jack drunkenly taking to the stage with her and relieving himself on live TV. He goes into rehab and she wrestles with where her focus should lie, eventually deciding to try and protect her recovering husband. She cancels her European tour when her agent, Rez, blocks the duo playing together.

As a result, Jack kills himself. He’s confronted by a seething Rez who has no sympathies or expectations of sobriety and states outright Jack’s ruining his wife’s career. When she matter-of-fact states the tour cancellation, he sees the impact of his actions and, while she plays a concert, he hangs himself in their garage.

Related: Every Song On A Star Is Born’s Soundtrack

This breaks Ally at first, leaving her emotionally distraught, before her understanding the meaning of Jack’s sacrifice – to enable her to truly become the star he always saw – helps her pull through. The film ends at a tribute concert in Jack’s memory. “My name is Ally Maine.” she declares before singing “I’ll Never Love Again”, a song based on their relationship they wrote together while he was recovering. A flashback shows the pair singing, she looks through the camera at the audience, the end.

Why A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad

Removing the ending of all presentation and self-imposed importance (a character looking into the camera at the end is an overused trope that Cooper simply doesn’t earn), in just writing down the events of A Star Is Born its problems should be obvious.

Jack decides to kill himself to save his wife, committing suicide because it’s the only way to set her free. This comes about two hours into a film which has slowly built up its numerous interpersonal relationships, and so comes as a drastic and rather unearned turn. Now, there is an argument to be made about accuracy to the unpredictability of mental illness, but given the intimacy audiences had with both Jack and Ally up until this moment, that doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. A Star Is Born, plainly, presents suicide as the only way out. It’s meant to come across as a selfless act but still values success as a true route to happiness, meaning anything emotional about the “gesture” is laced with hypocrisy.

But it’s what comes after and Ally’s coming to terms with her loss that’s so disquieting. For all her innate talent being the drive of the story and her freely made decision to step back what motivated Jack to kill himself, the final scene makes everything about Jack; the mononymous singer for the first time takes on her husband’s surname at his concert, where she performs a song that he helped her write in her original singer style. The suggestion is meant to be that Jack was holding her back, but in the shadow of the previous two hours the strange implication is that the act of a true star being born came from the adversity of Jack’s sacrifice. Making Ally’s success symbiotic to her dead husband is already heavily in the text of the film, but the final scene makes her final ascension even more indebted to his drastic act.

It’s hard to not read A Star Is Born‘s ending as trivializing suicide down to a plot point to give the fundamentally broken male lead the defining role in its female protagonist’s arc. It’s a weird move to make in 2018, although don’t believe this is just the product of an 80-year-old movie being remade. There’s something flawed at the heart of A Star Is Born.

Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad

The True Story Behind A Star Is Born’s Ending Explains The Problem

There have been four versions of A Star Is Born: the 1937 Hollywood-skewering original starring Janet Gaynor and Frederick March, the 1954 musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 shift to the music industry with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the latest Cooper/Gaga release. Each one has its own quirks, but all endeavor to tell the same story of love and fame intertwined, and all have the same basic ending. But the 1937 version isn’t the start. While A Star Is Born‘s narrative is a fiction, it’s very much based on truth; each movie is rooted heavily in the entertainment industry of the time – Hollywood for the 1937 and 1954 versions, music for 1976 and 2018 – and aims to tell an encapsulating story. There are some real-life events that inspired it.

The established star falling for an unknown as she climbs to the top was seen in actors Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay’s relationship, with the pair marrying in 1928 when the former was an unknown after starring in a Broadway show together. Their marriage fell apart after she rose above him and he fell into alcoholism. They separated in 1935 after seven years of marriage, two years before A Star Is Born was released. This appears to have been composited with the death of silent film actor John Bowers, who died at sea in 1936 after failing to win a part (whether it was a suicide or not is unclear). There are others (as we’ll see) but these are regarded as the ones who powered the 1937 version.

Related: Lady Gaga Fans Are Trolling Venom With Fake Bad Reviews

Of course, there’s one key distinction between inspiration and movie: in real life, it was two unrelated stories. There are the famous lovers who piggyback success and the past-it star who takes his own life, but in all cases these two aspects are entirely independent; the woman goes on to greater success by cutting the man out, while elsewhere another man falls from grace. Both stories epitomize Hollywood together, and taken alongside each other rather than melded have an ingrained believability. A Star Is Born trades that for something more streamlined in having the suicide be the culmination of the romance, but it’s also idealistic and wistful, losing the real moral of either.

This is reflected in what is regarded as a proto-Star Is Born, the 1932 film What Price Hollywood? Released five years before the 1937 version and produced also by David O. Selznick (and directed by George Cukor, who was approached for the first A Star Is Born and directed the first remake), this is regarded as something of a dry run at the story. Obviously from the release year it can’t share the same real-life inspirations (although, because this is the Golden Age of Hollywood, there are others pointed to), but the core concept and even smaller story beats are there, albeit with one massive difference: the leads are not romantically involved. Lowell Sherman’s Max drunkenly finds Constance Bennett’s Mary and helps make her a star, eventually killing himself after he sees realizes how far he’s fallen and is hurting his friend, while Mary’s suffers an ill-fated marriage that breaks down due to her absences filming and is reconciled at the end.

Watched today, What Price Hollywood? has a cynicism about the film industry ahead of its time despite ultimately being a movie romanticizing Hollywood – and at the core of this is the tragic story of Max and its impact on Mary’s life. The title question is apt.

How The Remakes Have Tried To “Fix” The Ending

In contrast to What Price Hollywood?, A Star Is Born 1937 carries a self-awareness and charm, but in bridging the romantic and the career side of protagonist Esther creates the problematic suicide reading. It’s not helped by dated elements, including the defining part of Esther’s ascension being the actress known as Vicki Lester taking on her husband’s name with a declaration “This is Mrs. Norman Maine“. It works given the time period, but even 16 years later needed an update.

Related: Watch the Trailer For A Star Is Born

The 1954 version is, for the most part, a beat-for-beat remake, just with dance number expansion to make it a musical, but it does make some strides to justifying the ending. The toll that caring for a drunk has on Judy Garland’s Vicki Lester is shown gradually, most upsettingly in an off-stage breakdown she immediately returns to filming from: an unavoidable presentation of the line between art and performer. But, ultimately, it ends in the same way: Norman Maine overhears Vicki’s plans to quit acting to care for her husband, so he feigns going for a swim and drowns himself; after a traumatic period and being unmasked at her funeral (the invasion of the press), Vicki returns to the public eye where she declares herself “Mrs. Norman Maine“. Every issue discussed is here.

The 1976’s A Star Is Born is overall incredibly melodramatic, nowhere less than its handling of the ending. What it should be praised for is its attempts at giving the female lead a greater sense of autonomy: throughout Streisand’s Esther makes decisions that power the narrative, not just being led along by Kristoffersen as those who came before her, but that’s lost thuddingly in the finale. After his meltdown, John Howard has imposed isolation – not rehab – and when returning home immediately sleeps with a reporter wanting an interview for Esther. The couple tries to power past this, but John figures he’s still broken and crashes his car at high speeds. Again, Esther is sad before taking his name (and singing at a tribute event).

Like we’ve already explored with A Star Is Born 2018, all versions have tried to provide their own contemporary spin on the tale to iron out its kinks, yet all wind up having to repeat the same suicide-anger-name triple-tap that doesn’t belong. A degree can be accounted to the changing times, but that ignores that the original trio of movies released over nearly 40 years, and that Cooper wasn’t able to address it either.

Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

Why Bradley Cooper Can’t Fix A Star Is Born

Bradley Cooper certainly tries to bring a modern slant to the worn tale of A Star Is Born. He invests heavily in making Jack and Ally’s opposite trajectories operate independently – Jack is suffering from tinnitus before he’s heard a note of “La Vie En Rose”, while Ally’s SNL appearance is deemed to contradict his advice – while making the love story more immediate. It’s a bigger story, more personal and considerably more consummately paced.

But, like all the others, the ending hits a snag. And some of his decisions make it worse. The method of final descent is different, with the awards show upset and rehab undone not by Maine going off the rails again as in every other take, but rather by Ally’s agent calling his supposed bluff. It’s implied from the British Rez knowing when exactly Jackson first toured across the pond that he was once a fan, now disillusioned with his hero, making him a millennial scapegoat to any affronting reading.

Related: 2018 Fall Movie Preview: The 30 Films to See

This generational push and pull could have been what sent A Star Is Born to greatness. Sam Elliott’s speech about there only being twelve notes played over and over, with the majesty coming from how the artist uses them is a beautiful sentiment that sees Cooper self-justifying another remake and appears like a zen view on the entertainment business that birthed it. Except it isn’t, because this idea is also trying to explain the ending, claiming that the music industry is cyclical and that stars are born and then new stars are born later; Jack’s death is enabling that. What the film seems to miss is that for one state to ever enter another, a star must always die. Ally will fall too. The raw textual argument is that the failures are as eternal as the successes, raising the question of worth, yet the film provides no further exploration and presents it as somehow immediately uplifting.

And that’s the hump that A Star Is Born 2018, like its predecessors, can’t get over. The story thinks it’s a biting, self-aware take on itself, but it’s too close to the subject to see that it’s really just propagating a harsh cycle. This isn’t helped by the film being weighted by so much – the casting of Lady Gaga, his writer-director-producer-actor whammy, even Sam Elliott as the Sam Elliott-type – although those concerns are also the key explanation for what’s really going on.

A Star Is Born Only Exists Because Of Ego

Throughout this article, there’s been one question dangling unspoken. Why are there four versions of A Star Is Born anyway? It’s a story that is flawed and dated, on a topic which has been tackled in more films than any other. Yes, each movie got serious Oscar nominations and wins, but that alone isn’t enough to justify going back. The true answer is enlightening.

1954’s A Star Is Born was conceived as a bid to restart Judy Garland’s career after it stalled over the 1940s. 1976’s A Star Is Born was Barbra Streisand’s attempt (along with then-husband Jon Peters) to boost her standing in Hollywood. And 2018’s A Star Is Born is Bradley Cooper’s grand attempt to win the Oscar that he believes he deserves (his entire post-Hangover career is a carefully played game of chess with a Golden Baldie the King). There are studio concerns too (before Cooper, Warner Bros had been attempting to get a remake off the ground since the early 2010s, although as a Beyonce vehicle has the same career expansion goals), but those are the primary purposes of each version. A Star Is Born is a vanity project on repeat.

Related: A Star Is Born Is An Oscar Favorite – But Could An Infamous Producer Hurt Its Chances?

Now, vanity projects needn’t be bad, and indeed a lot of good comes from each of these attempts. Indeed, each was ultimately successful in both their primary and commercial goals: Garland’s career was rejuvenated; Streisand won her second Oscar; and Cooper’s currently the front-runner in multiple categories for next year’s Academy Awards.

But this aspect appears to be why each version of A Star Is Born struggles to understand the real meaning of its ending. Each powering force believes this movie will be what takes them being a Norman/Jack Maine to a new Esther/Ally while missing that it’s built into the story to be impossible. They believe so much in the two contradictory Hollywood legends wholesale, so don’t see that the story is almost warning against such a thing.

A Star Is Born Is No Longer Needed

In recent years, we’ve seen Hollywood’s reliable rotation of movies about itself take a genuinely incisive slant. 2015’s Best Picture Winner Birdman was an ostentatious exploration of ego that too ended with the protagonist committing suicide, but there it was with the wry critique that fame and adoration are fleeting and that such a bold act was the only way for the self-involved hero to reach the heights he dreamed of. Then there’s 2017’s almost-Best Picture Winner La La Land, which was a celebration of Hollywood-gone-by looking at love in a city of stars, eventually concluding that success required the sacrifice of the central relationship.

Together, these take on all the ideas that A Star Is Born is playing with and apply them in a more thoughtful way. The messages are more widely applicable and their endnotes have considerably less of the hypocrisy. Birdman and La La Land may find joy in the arts, but they also uncover the trials of creativity and fame, keeping the brutal truths in earshot while presenting from a position of success.

A Star Is Born 2018 is a good movie, an undeniable achievement for both Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. But there is a flaw at the heart of the tale that just doesn’t ring true. Unless it’s made with a completely revisionist, ego-less eye, in twenty years we do not need another one.

More: Every Version Of A Star Is Born Ranked, From Garland To Gaga



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2018-10-06 01:10:52 – Alex Leadbeater

Barbie Movie Now Starring Margot Robbie, Eyes Wonder Woman Director

Warner Bros. is taking control of the long-delayed Barbie live-action movie and Oscar-nominated actress Margot Robbie is in talks to produce and star in it. If a deal is reached, the movie will be handled through Robbie’s banner Luckychap Entertainment – the same group producing the upcoming Birds of Prey movie for DC Films.

First announced in 2009, the Barbie movie has spent the better part of a decade being tossed around Hollywood like a hot potato. The project started at Universal, before moving to Sony, where Diablo Cody was hired to work on a script. Amy Schumer was cast to star in the film in 2016 before dropping out due to other commitments, at which point Anne Hathaway was cast as Barbie. Plans were made for the film to begin shooting this year in anticipation of a 2020 release, before the rights revered back to Mattel, who sold the film rights to Warner Bros.

Related: Birds of Prey Movie: Margot Robbie Pushing to Hire Diverse Co-Stars

THR reports that Robbie is in talks to play the title role in the movie, with Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins reportedly being eyed to direct, but negotiations haven’t started on that front yet.

It’s unknown at this point just what sort of film Warner Bros. intends to make using the Barbie license. Previous scripts for Sony were reportedly based around the idea of putting a spin on the classic Barbie mythology, exploring the issues of feminism and identity in a modern world through the eyes of a character who has not always exemplified the ideals of feminine empowerment. It’s also unknown if Mattel took ownership of these Barbie scripts of if they remained the property of Sony. This would be the standard practice, but Mattel could still move forward with the idea of a more proactive Barbie with interests beyond fashion and boys at Warner Bros.

It seems likely that concept of such a Barbie movie would appeal to Robbie, whose most recent works have been centered around the portrayal of strong women. In addition to her work producing the Birds of Prey movie (in which she will reprise her role as the anti-hero Harley Quinn), Robbie will soon be appearing in Josie Rourke’s Mary, Queen of Scots as Queen Elizabeth I of England. She is also signed to star in Marian, a film based around the idea of Maid Marian having to lead a new rebellion against the newly crowned King John in the wake of the death of her husband, Robin Hood.

More: Mary Queen of Scots International Trailer: Ronan & Robbie Go to War 

Source: THR



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2018-10-05 02:10:15 – Matt Morrison

She-Ra NYCC Trailer Reveals Adora Shares Her Secret Identity With Others

The first full trailer for the first season of Netflix’s reboot of the classic animated series She-Ra has revealed big changes, as Princess Adora will no longer be hiding her secret identity as She-Ra from her friends in The Great Rebellion. The trailer also addresses two major plot-holes from the original series’ origin story for She-Ra, which have often been a source of humor and criticism for the show’s fans and detractors.

Created in 1985 to offer a girl-friendly companion to He-Man And The Masters of the Universe, She-Ra: Princess of Power centered upon the adventures of Adora, Princess of Eternia. Kidnapped in infancy by the villain Hordak and raised as his own daughter on the planet of Etheria, Adora grew up ignorant of her heritage and the great destiny that awaited her until her long-lost twin brother Adam delivered unto her The Sword of Honor. The magical power of the sword revealed the truth of her life to Adora, allowing her to transform into the legendary heroine She-Ra, much as her brother changed into the warrior He-Man. Adora elected to remain on Etheria, however, joining The Great Rebellion that arose against Hordak’s Evil Horde to atone for her past crimes, with only a few trusted allies knowing that Princess Adora and She-Ra were one and the same.

Related: Netflix’s She-Ra Reboot Trailer Teases Adora’s First Transformation

Dreamworks TV revealed the first full trailer for the first season of the She-Ra reboot, which can be viewed below, at NYCC 2018 before posting it to their YouTube channel. Dreamworks TV also revealed the first poster for the new series, which can also be viewed below.

The biggest revelation to come from the trailer is that Adora will reveal her secret identity to the rest of the warriors in The Great Rebellion early on in the series. It seems that she will encounter The Great Rebellion first as She-Ra and be told of a prophecy that the legendary warrior She-Ra would return and aid The Great Rebellion at a time of great need. Adora does this to win some degree of trust from the rebels, as they would have no reason to believe Adora’s word that she wished to atone for her crimes as part of Hordak’s army otherwise.

In addition to providing its target young audience with an important moral lesson about honesty, this trailer tackles two oddities from the original She-Ra backstory. First, it addresses how quickly and easily Princess Adora is able to win the trust of The Great Rebellion without any sign of contrition beyond an apology for everything she did as part of The Evil Horde. It also addresses just how Adora could have no idea that the group that raised her, which openly called itself The Evil Horde, might be a bit on the dodgy side. In the new series, The Horde is called The Evil Horde by everyone else and Adora is revealed to have had a sheltered upbringing far away from the commoners that The Evil Horde oppressed.

These changes, while unlikely to win over those who have blasted the She-Ra reboot for its cartoonish art style and racially diverse cast, speak to the care and craft that show-runner Noelle Stevenson and the rest of her creative team have put into the new series. Based on what we see here, the show will offer a welcome balance of action, humor and good moral lessons – just like the original Princess of Power cartoon. Thankfully, fans will not have long to wait for the show’s arrival.

More: Netflix’s She-Ra Cast Confirms Reboot Includes LGBT Characters

She-Ra and the Princesses of Power season 1 premieres on Netflix on November 16.

Source: Dreamworks TV



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2018-10-04 05:10:04 – Matt Morrison