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Boston Legal Cast: Where Are They Now? | ScreenRant

Ahh, Boston Legal. One of television’s finest legal dramedys of all time, the show ran for a criminally short 5 season, when it reigned among Primetime’s premium offerings until its unfortunate cancellation in 2008.

RELATED: 10 Shows To Watch After Suits Ends

Like many of David E. Kelley’s productions, the cast was star-studded and the writing was unmatched. Though there was a Rolodex of rotating main characters throughout the show’s history, there were also many who remained with the series for multiple seasons. Here are ten of the most iconic fixtures in the world of Boston Legal, and what they are up to today!

10 Henry Gibson: Judge Clark Brown

Henry Gibson starting acting in the late 50s when he was a young boy. He is well-remembered for starring in the Jerry Lewis film The Nutty Professor, as well as starring as Quirt Manly on The Beverly Hillbillies. His full comedic potential was realized in 1971 when he joined Laugh-In, where he lasted in the cast for 3 years and was nominated for a Golden Globe. Gibson also frequently lent his voice to animated roles, including Charlotte’s Web, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, and King of the Hill.

As Judge Clark Brown, Gibson remained a constant presence on Boston Legal even when the main cast departed their roles. He appeared in 24 episodes of the series and stayed until the series ended in 2008. Unfortunately, it was one of his last roles and he passed away in 2009, a week before his 74th birthday.

9 Gary Anthony Williams: Clarence/Clarice Bell

Gary Anthony Williams first played Clarence “Clarice” Bell in Season 3 of Boston Legal, originally only slated to appear in one episode. The producers liked him so much that they expanded his part to be recurring, and then regular a bit later on. Though he disappeared after Season 4 with no explanation, Williams has had no shortage of work after his time on the series.

RELATED: Where Are They Now: Whose Line Is It Anyway? (U.S.)

He frequently appears on the revival of Whose Line Is It Anyway, and does voice-over work as Mufasa in the Disney series The Lion Guard, as well as playing Uncle Ruckus in the Adult Swim program The Boondocks. He also appeared as a recurring character on the sitcom The Soul Man, and played a part on sketch-comedy series Mad, based on the popular magazine of the same name.

8 Julie Bowen: Denise Bauer

Julie Bowen was active in the industry before her appearance as junior attorney Denise Bauer on Boston Legal, but you probably know more about her career after the show ended. After her first prominent role on television in the series Ed, her three years on Boston Legal was only a precursor for her most famous role as Claire Dunphy on Modern Family.

Bowen has scored six consecutive Emmy nominations for Modern Family, winning two in 2011 and 2012. She is still starring on the show today, but it is set to end after its 11th season.

7 Mark Valley: Brad Chase

Before his acting career began, Mark Valley served in the military during the Gulf War, and he actually received his first acting role while stationed in Germany. He took a role in Days of our Lives during the mid-’90s, playing Jack Deveraux for four years on the soap.

RELATED: Grey’s Anatomy: The 10 Best Love Triangles, Ranked

On Boston Legal, Valley starred as attorney Brad Chase, staying with the show for 70 episodes, which is still his longest-running television role to date. He has starred in a few film and television roles since his time on the series, most prominently Fringe, Human Target, Body of Proof, and Harry’s Law, where he played another attorney that worked for Kathy Bates’ character, Harry.

6 John Larroquette: Carl Sack

John Larroquette has played a few attorneys in his acting career, including that of Dan Fielding on the popular Night Court, for which he picked up 4 consecutive Emmy wins. After playing Shirley’s eventual romantic interest, Carl Sack, on Boston Legal, Larroquette has starred in guest spots on numerous television shows like Phineas and Ferb and CSI: New York.

In 2014, Larroquette starred in The Librarians for 42 episodes, playing Jenkins for 4 years until the show’s cancellation. Most recently, he has appeared in Blood & Treasure in a recurring role as billionaire Jacob Reece. The show has just been renewed for a second season, so we may be seeing more of him on the series in the future!

5 Christian Clemenson: Jerry Espenson

Famous for his role as the eccentric and kind-hearted Jerry Espenson on Boston Legal, for which he received the Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series in 2006, Christian Clemenson was not new to the industry. He had already been seen in acclaimed films like Apollo 13, Hannah and Her Sisters, and The Big Lebowski. Clemenson was also talented enough in his craft to graduate from both Harvard and Yale!

RELATED: 10 Shows To Watch If You Like Fargo

After Boston Legal ended, Clemenson retained a recurring role in the 8th, 9th, and 10th seasons of CSI: Miami, and also appeared as a guest on another David E. Kelley production, Harry’s Law. Most recently, Clemenson portrayed the primary role of Deputy District Attorney William Hodgman in the Ryan Murphy production American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson.

4 René Auberjonois: Paul Lewiston

René Auberjonois had a long career before his tenure as the practical, poised Paul Lewiston on Boston Legal. Prior to the part, he performed in the smash-hit M.A.S.H. and even lent his voice to animated features like The Little Mermaid and Cats Don’t Dance. He also portrayed Clayton Endicott III on the sitcom Benson, for which he was nominated for an Emmy, and had a starring role in the ’90s series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

After Boston Legal, Auberjonois has resigned to mainly doing guest stints on both live-action and animated series, but he has been in many popular shows like Archer, Young Justice, The Good Wife, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and Madam Secretary. He also does extensive voice-work for video games, most notably for Fallout: New Vegas and the Uncharted series.

3 Candice Bergen: Shirley Schmidt

Candice Bergen has been in the television and film industry since the 1960s, receiving her first film role in Sidney Lumet’s The Group. She received her first Academy Award nomination in 1979 for Starting Over, a role she played opposite the iconic Burt Reynolds. Her stint on the 1988 to 1998 sitcom Murphy Brown became her most well-known role, scoring her 5 Emmys out of 7 nominations.

Bergen was also Emmy nominated twice for her role as the wise and intelligent Shirley Schmidt on Boston Legal but unfortunately didn’t take home any wins. After Boston Legal, Bergen starred in the romantic comedy Bride Wars, also lending her name in recent years to smaller guest spots in films. In 2018, CBS commissioned a Murphy Brown reboot starring Bergen that was sadly canceled in May 2019.

2 William Shatner: Denny Crane

Say it with me, now: Denny…Crane. William Shatner has long been a mainstay in the world of television, first coming to prominence in the original Star Trek series as Captain James T. Kirk. After his work as the eponymous T.J. Hooker and two seasons of starring in 3rd Rock from the Sun, Shatner made his debut as the wily Denny Crane on The Practice, before receiving a part in the spin-off Boston Legal. He was well-awarded for the role, taking home an Emmy and a Golden Globe.

After Boston Legal ended, Shatner performed in 2 Broadway one-man shows, one of which ended up touring the country after its initial three-week run. He also wrote and produced a Star Trek documentary entitled The Captains, exploring the different actors that have portrayed the role that first made him famous. He most recently starred in the reality program Better Late Than Never, in which four seasoned American men explored new cultures in order to check them off their bucket list.

1 James Spader: Alan Shore

James Spader’s character Alan Shore first made his debut on the long-running David E. Kelley series The Practice, and then took the lead for five seasons of Boston Legal. Throughout the series, Alan Shore proves himself as both an attorney and a person, enduring many personal changes as his friendship with Denny Crane evolves. Spader won 3 Emmys for the role: One for The Practice in 2004 and two for Boston Legal in 2005 and 2007.

It’s safe to say that Spader has been doing phenomenally after the show ended in 2008. After a season-long stint on popular American sitcom The Office, he now stars on NBC’s The Blacklist as main character Raymond “Red” Reddington, a role for which he has picked up 2 Golden Globe nominations!

NEXT: The Blacklist: 10 Questions We Still Have After The Season 6 Finale


2019-07-11 01:07:10

Katy Wilkins

Johnny Depp Feels Bad J.K. Rowling Had to Defend His Casting to Harry Potter Fans

Johnny Depp is finally addressing those who oppose his casting in the upcoming Harry Potter film, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, including how they have affected writer J.K. Rowling. Last year, following the release of the first cast photo for the film, the author expressed her support of the casting. Rowling, along with director David Yates, skated around the concerns, saying that she is “genuinely happy” to have him on board.

Controversy regarding Depp’s involvement in the beloved franchise came about around the time of the first film. Depp had been embroiled in a legal battle with his ex-wife, Amber Heard, over allegations of domestic violence. The Aquaman actress responded to a statement made by Warner Bros. (the studio behind both films), sharing the joint statement released by the pair following their divorce, but indicating that she is not necessarily in support of her ex.

Related: Johnny Depp Confirms Fantastic Beasts 3 Return As Grindelwald

Now, Depp is speaking out for the first time about his role, and a little about the various allegations against him. In an interview with EW, the actor remarks that he “felt bad” that Rowling was called to defend her choice to cast him. However, he maintains that he is innocent, remarking that he is suing The Sun for defamation. He insists that Rowling is aware of his innocence, which is why she supports him. “She would not stand up if she didn’t know the truth. So that’s really it,” he says.

The allegations he speaks of goes beyond those made by Heard. In July, Depp was sued for assault surrounding an incident that allegedly occurred on the set of his film City of Lies. The actor fought back, claiming that the accusations were false and he didn’t ever touch the defendant, location manager Gregg “Rocky” Brooks. In August, just a month before the film’s scheduled release, City of Lies was pulled, though it’s unknown if this was connected. But in the case of Fantastic Beasts, things continue on as they have.

The studio has clearly fully embraced Depp in the role. At San Diego Comic-Con 2018, he appeared separate from his fellow actors during the Warner Bros. panel, making a speech as Gellert Grindelwald. He is also featured prominently in the latest image for the Fantastic Beasts sequel, front and center with his back to the viewer as the rest of the characters, including Eddie Redmayne’s Newt Scamander and Judd Law’s young Albus Dumbledore, face forward looking at him. Now that it’s been announced that he’ll be returning in the third film, it seems as though everyone has decided to lean in and ignore the problematic allegations against Depp, even as they persist.

More: Johnny Depp’s Casting In Fantastic Beasts 2 Is A Mistake

Source: EW



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2018-10-11 03:10:55 – Becca Bleznak

Making A Murderer Part 2 Trailer: The Conviction Was Just The Beginning

Part 2 of Netflix’s true-crime docuseries Making a Murderer is set to stream on October 19, according to the first trailer. The new season is an anticipated follow-up to one of the most talked-about true-crime series in recent memory. The original series, which premiered in 2015, joined the likes of Serial and HBO’s The Jinx, as not only captivating television (or podcasts), but also highly influential series with real-world implications. The two subjects of Making a Murderer, Steven Avery and his newphew Brendan Dassey, had their convictions investigated — and in Dassey’s case, overturned before being upheld again — by a lengthy and fraught legal battle that is now the subject of the series’ second season. 

That Netflix would want to capitalize on the fervor of the first season is no surprise, but given that the follow-up was announced soon after the first season became a sensation, it is rather surprising the streaming service was willing to wait as long as it did for more. That certainly works in favor of the new episodes, as not only does it feel less opportunistic, but it also presents a greater likelihood that there will be more new information viewers were perhaps unaware of. 

More: Titans Premiere Review: Mature Content Doesn’t Make For Mature Storytelling

The trailer for Making a Murderer Part 2 plays out less as a follow-up to season 1 than a response to the furor it caused. The new season focuses its attentions on the efforts by attorney Kathleen Zellner to overturn the conviction of Avery and Dassey, and there’s plenty of seemingly compelling evidence presented to make is seem as though Zellner, her team, and Avery have a fighting chance. Check out the trailer below:

“Netflix presents the highly-anticipated second chapter of the critically acclaimed, Emmy Award-winning original documentary series Making a Murderer, which followed the unprecedented journey of Steven Avery from DNA exoneree and reformer to convicted murderer. Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos return to the Midwest where they have exclusive access to Steven Avery and his co-defendant and nephew Brendan Dassey, their families and the legal teams fighting for justice on their behalf.  Over the course of 10 new episodes, Making a Murderer Part 2 provides an in-depth look at the high-stakes post-conviction process, exploring the emotional toll the process takes on all involved.”

Of course, with all true crime documentaries, the news and the internet will beat them to the punch, so what they offer will be a more in-depth look at the process of overturning a conviction and, presumably, the evidence that will once again get viewers creating petitions to overturn a murder conviction. Whether Making a Murderer Part 2 will be the phenomenon season 1 was remains to be seen, but true-crime obsessives won’t have to wait long to get their fix. 

Next: The Man In The High Castle Season 3 Review: More Sci-Fi Action Refocuses The Series

Making a Murderer part 2 will stream on Netflix on Friday, October 19.



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2018-10-09 01:10:40 – Kevin Yeoman

Better Call Saul Season 4 Finale Ending Explained

This post contains SPOILERS for Better Call Saul

Better Call Saul’s fourth season ended with “Winner,” an exciting finale that inches the spinoff closer to its Breaking Bad roots. This year, AMC’s acclaimed drama had to followup the jaw-dropping cliffhanger of season 3, where Chuck died in a horrifying fire. That tragedy is what truly spurred Jimmy McGill’s transformation into Saul Goodman as he dealt with the consequences and aftermath of not only his brother’s death, but also his bar suspension. Over the course of the fourth season, Jimmy became more involved with the criminal underworld of Albuquerque, launching his “get-rich-quick” scheme of selling prepaid cell phones to unsavory individuals.

Elsewhere in the Saul universe, Gus Fring looked to expand his cartel operations, commissioning the construction of the famous “super lab” Walter White and Jesse Pinkman cooked in during Breaking Bad. Entrusting Mike Ehrmantraut to oversee the operation, Gus hired a group of German nationals led by Werner Ziegler. While the project was taking longer than originally planned, the crew was working diligently and hoped to have it finished soon. Of course, things hit a snag at the end of last week’s “Wiedersehen” when Werner went AWOL, leaving only a note with detailed instructions for his team. These storylines (Werner’s disappearance and Jimmy’s bar reinstatement appeal) are the crux of the finale’s narrative, with both resolving in powerful ways.

The Tragedy of Werner Ziegler

Throughout the season, Werner’s team were recurring players, frequently interacting with Mike. Early on, it looked like Kai would be the troublemaker of the group, especially after his incident with the nightclub. However, Kai turned out to be a red herring, and Werner caused the biggest headaches for Gus and Mike. Werner, of course, is far from home and dearly misses his beloved wife. Wishing to see her again, Werner pitched Mike the idea of going home for a weekend, but was denied. Since he couldn’t get his superiors’ approval, Werner took matters into his own hands and hatched a plot for a loving reunion.

“Winner” reveals Werner ran off to a resort where he planned to spend time with his wife. He made travel arrangements that would see her fly over to America for a weekend and go back home. Sadly for Werner, he never gets to see her again. Mike tracks him down and after a discussion with Gus, realizes there’s only one resolution for this setback. Allowing Werner the opportunity to call his wife and tell her to return home before Gus’ people do anything to her, Mike then (reluctantly) kills Werner. Ehrmantraut says Werner’s death will be covered up as a tragic accident and his men will be sent back. As one might expect, Gus is angered by the lack of progress on the super lab (cutting a conversation with Gale short), which he thought would be completed by now.

Related: How Better Call Saul’s (Unseen) Breaking Bad Character Connects To Jimmy

Werner clearly had no ill intent (Mike knew he was jut homesick), but when he ran off, his fate was essentially sealed. This was the second transgression Werner committed against Gus – the first being his friendly chat about construction work with bar patrons. These two incidents back-to-back made it very difficult for Gus to trust Werner moving forward, and by now, fans are well aware of Fring’s ruthlessness. Mike mentions multiple times in the episode there are other ways to go about things, but he can’t convince Gus to spare Werner’s life. No amount of begging or pleading has any effect on Gus when he’s made up his mind about something. Unfortunately for Werner, he never completely understood what he got himself into and crossed the wrong people.

Lalo also factors into this storyline, with the mysterious member of the Salamanca clan tailing Mike and trying to locate Werner for his own reasons. Lalo does discover which resort Werner is staying at and briefly speaks to the Russian over the phone, posing as one of Gus’ employees. Not knowing any better, Werner begins to tell Lalo the first couple of basic instructions for the super lab construction, before Mike arrives in person and interrupts the call. Near the end of the episode, Mike tells Gus about what happened, and it’ll be fascinating to see how this continues in season 5. Of course, Fring does not get along with the Salamancas, and despite Lalo’s cheeky offer of a peace treaty in last week’s episode, the two warring sides will continue their power struggle. Lalo is clearly curious about what Gus is up to and wants to get an upper hand for himself.

Page 2: Jimmy McGill Becomes Saul Goodman

Jimmy McGill Is Finally Saul Goodman

Jimmy’s arc in season 4 is dealing with the fallout of his felony from season 2 (tampering with Chuck’s documents) as he tries to get by in life with his one-year suspension. Picking up lawful employment at CC Mobile, he does everything he’s supposed to do to work himself back in the graces of the committee. However, last week’s episode ended with the shocking twist that Jimmy was denied reinstatement – after he was found to be insincere in his comments. Kim, as she always does, stays by Jimmy’s side to help him win the appeal. In Kim’s mind, the sincerity issue stems from Chuck and Jimmy needs to show remorse for what’s transpired.

The two forge ahead with another one of their brilliant schemes. Jimmy spends the one-year anniversary of Chuck’s death mourning at his brother’s grave. An “anonymous” donation is made to HHM to name the legal library after Chuck, with members of Jimmy’s go-to video team telling people in attendance they heard the gift was from Jimmy. It all builds up to another hearing in front of the committee, where Jimmy uses the letter Chuck left him as a weapon in his favor. After (faking) being unable to read it in place of an opening statement, Jimmy launches into a nostalgic monologue where he reminisces about his brother, talks about wanting to make Chuck proud, and credits Chuck with influencing his interest in a law career. In their celebration afterwards, Kim feels some it was truthful, but Jimmy’s reaction makes it painfully apparent it was all a show for the committee so he could get his law license back. As he prepares to sign the necessary documents, Jimmy states he’ll no longer be practicing under his legal name. Turning to a clearly shocked Kim, he closes out the season by saying, “S’all good, man.”

Related: Bob Odenkirk Responds to Fan Theory About Chuck’s Letter

At a certain time in his life, Jimmy probably aspired to be an honest, hard-working lawyer like Chuck, but the events of Better Call Saul have rendered that impossible. During a key sequence of the episode, Jimmy (as part of his sincerity scheme) sits on the board awarding scholarships in Chuck’s memory. He vouches for a student named Kristy Esposito, who received only one vote (from Jimmy) because she was found guilty of shoplifting. In that moment, Jimmy realizes that the law community at large will never accept someone with a prior record, and clearly sees himself in the young Kristy. Because of his actions in season 2, the most prominent firms in the country will always consider Jimmy a liability, no matter how much he swears he’s changed. Chasing down Kristy after the scholarship meetings, Jimmy basically lays out the Saul Goodman playbook, telling his favorite student to cut corners and to not worry about what others think (because she’ll never “make it” the traditional way).

Instead of conforming to fit within the perceived standards of the field, Jimmy gamed the system to his own advantage. He told the reinstatement committee what they wanted to hear – even though he has no intention of following through on it – and is now set to play by his own rules. In his argument with Kim on the rooftop in “Wiedersehen,” Jimmy went on the defensive about how Kim views him as “the kind of lawyer guilty people hire” and is unworthy of sharing an office with her (while she thrives at a large firm in New Mexico). Jimmy is embracing his reputation. Saul Goodman, as Breaking Bad fans know, is exactly the type of lawyer criminals hire. Howard Hamlin wouldn’t touch Walter White and Jesse Pinkman with a 10-foot pole, but Saul went into business with them, doing whatever he could to protect his clients’ rights and help them avoid jail time.

The beauty of this is how it all traces back to Chuck and recontextualizes the character of Saul Goodman. When he was introduced in the second season of Breaking Bad, he was nothing more than an entertaining side player; a riff on the “sleazy lawyer” archetype who came up with elaborate schemes to win his cases. Now, the persona is revealed as a last resort for a man who once upon a time looked up to his brother, only to have his hopes and dreams destroyed by that very same sibling. Chuck went out of his way to block Jimmy from getting a position at HHM, fearful of what “Slippin’ Jimmy with a law degree” would be capable of. He wasn’t willing to give Jimmy the benefit of the doubt, and ended up unknowingly launching the career of Albuquerque’s shadiest criminal defense attorney. Maybe if he was more accepting and loving towards Jimmy, things would have turned out differently.

It’ll be exciting to see how the confirmed fifth season picks up on this. There were already hints the Jimmy/Kim relationship was fraying (the wonderfully constructed cold open of “Something Stupid”), and the former’s new career path might be the final straw. Kim is never mentioned in Breaking Bad, so obviously something happens there. Better Call Saul correctly took the long road to get to this point, and now the possibilities for its future are wide open.

More: Better Call Saul Fills In Breaking Bad Gaps



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2018-10-08 07:10:07 – Chris Agar

6 Casting Decisions That Hurt It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia (And 14 That Saved It)

There are sitcoms that everyone loves, and then there’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia — a series which has managed to turn off many with its despicable characters and depraved sense of humor. From faking cancer to trying to eat a homeless person, there are no depths that are too low for the owners of Paddy’s Pub. But you don’t get to thirteen seasons without making a few fans in the process.

While It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia might not pull in the biggest numbers, the show has maintained such a rabid following over the years that one has to wonder if they’ve accidentally gotten there hands on some raccoon meat. But the more likely scenario is that many people have just as twisted of a sense of humor as the makers of this FX series.

The sitcom was created by Rob McElhenney with the help of Glenn Howerton and Charlie Day, who would go on to portray Mac, Dennis, and Charlie on the series. Kaitlin Olson and Danny DeVito fill out the rest of the main cast as Dee and Frank Reynolds, and for over the last decade, fans have been happily following the bizarre misadventures of the Gang. Of course, it’s impossible to imagine anyone else in these leading roles. With over 130 episodes, there has been no shortage of supporting characters and celebrity cameo, some of which have been a lot better than others.

Here are 6 Casting Decisions That Hurt It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia (And 14 That Saved It).

20 Saved: Glenn Howerton as Dennis Reynolds

In a sea of despicable characters, Dennis Reynolds has slowly revealed himself to be the most reprehensible of them all. Dennis may have begun the series as one of the more sensible members of the Gang — albeit one with an extremely short fuse, but he’s slowly revealed himself to be a cool and calculated sociopath. One who also happens to have a heavy side of narcissistic personality disorder.

While Glenn Howerton didn’t want to name the character after himself for fear of people drawing an unwelcome comparison, that hasn’t stopped Howerton from taking the character to some extremely dark places. He’s more than a little convincing when he lays out one of his manipulative plans. While his temper tantrums may be over-the-top, you never doubt the authenticity of the rage and frustration Howerton has embedded into his performance.

19 Saved: Mary Elizabeth Ellis as The Waitress

One of the most prominent recurring characters on It’s Always Sunny, the Waitress has been a part of the series since the very beginning. She is the unrequited love interest of Charlie throughout the majority of the show — though it seems like the tables have turned in recent episodes.

The Waitress is portrayed by Mary Elizabeth Ellis, who had previously worked with Charlie Day on an episode of Reno 911! The two were married shortly after It’s Always Sunny began, adding another layer of hilarity to the dysfunctional relationship between the two characters on screen.

Ellis fully commits to her performance as the down-on-her-luck waitress.

She’s an example of the tight-knit community working behind-the-scenes that has made the series such a success.

18 Hurt: Jason Sudeikis as Schmitty

While sitcoms usually lend themselves well to celebrity cameos, It’s Always Sunny has created such a distinct world that more often than not these cameos end up feeling out of place. There have been a few instances where they’ve managed to pull them off. Josh Groban popping up in one of Dee’s fantasies seemed fitting, and Dax Shepard manages to blend in fairly well into the episodes where Mac and Charlie join a cult.

In the case of Jason Sudeikis and a number of other celebrities, the cameos just end up coming across as distracting. There’s nothing inherently wrong with Jason Sudeikis playing Schmitty — an ex-member of the Gang who makes an unexpected return. The whole time, you never forget that you’re watching Sudeikis, which just doesn’t work for the tone of the series.

17 Saved: Mary Lynn Rajskub as Gail the Snail

Though she’s only appeared in three episodes of the series to date, Gail the Snail is definitely one of those side characters that we’d like to see more of. She first appeared back in the season five episode “The Gang Gives Frank an Intervention”, where she is the clingy cousin of Dennis and Dee who talks with a lisp and has the disgusting habit of slurping her saliva. Dennis and Dee have found that the only way to get rid of her is to dust her with salt, hence her nickname of Gail the Snail.

The character is portrayed by the talented Mary Lynn Rajskub, who is best known for playing Chloe O’Brian on 24.

This is undeniably a very different character, and it’s impressive just how committed Rajskub is to playing someone so hilariously obnoxious.

16 Saved: David Hornsby as Cricket

The Gang has dragged their fair share of individuals down into the dirt with them, but none are more apparent than Rickety Cricket. Portrayed by David Hornsby, Cricket is a former classmate of the Gang who was once infatuated with Dee. He debuted in season two as a clean-cut priest who has slowly transformed into the addicted hobo that we have today.

Hornsby has been such a prominent member of the show that last season he was given his own episode with “A Cricket’s Tale”, which cleverly intertwined the character’s other brief appearances throughout the season into the story. Hornsby has also been a big part of the show behind-the-scenes as well, serving as an executive producer and a writer of nearly 30 episodes.

15 Hurt: Brian Unger as The Attorney

It’s Always Sunny has a number of supporting characters who re-emerge every few seasons, only to be dragged down by the shenanigans of the Gang once again. Brian Unger plays one such character with the Attorney, who the Gang often visits for legal advice only to contradict everything the lawyer has to say.

As a former correspondent of The Daily Show, Unger is really good at playing the straight man.

In fact, he’s too good, which makes it hard to believe that he would put up with these self-centered, narcissistic characters for more than a few episodes. Often, these supporting characters are revealed to be a little bit off in their own right, but Unger is just too normal to make his character mesh with the series.

14 Saved: Danny DeVito as Frank Reynolds

Danny DeVito first popped up in season two of It’s Always Sunny, and his casting as Frank Reynolds quite literally saved the series. While the higher-ups at FX reportedly loved the first season, not enough people were watching to warrant a second outing. McElhenney, Howerton, and Day were given the ultimatum to add a bigger name or face cancellation. While they worried how DeVito would fit into the series, the veteran actor has more than proven himself as a worthy member of the Gang.

The insane things that DeVito will do for the character are a testament to the actor’s commitment. Even more impressive is how you never feel like you’re watching a performance. DeVito becomes Frank Reynolds. Even when he’s not delivering lines, just watching him futz about in the background is already hilarious enough.

13 Saved: Charlie Day as Charlie Kelly

It’s Always Sunny has turned all of its leading actors into stars, but Charlie Day is the biggest breakout of them all. Since appearing on the show, Day has worked on a number of hit films, including Horrible Bosses, Pacific Rim, and The Lego Movie.

His star power has no doubt helped the show remain on the air for so long.

Thanks to Day’s performance and musical talents, the character of Charlie has no shortage of memorable moments. Bird law aside, Charlie may be the least intelligent member of the Gang. In a lot of ways, he’s the heart of the show. Charlie certainly has his share of questionable moments, but they often stem from ignorance rather than malice, which set him apart from the other employees of Paddy’s Pub.

12 Hurt: Sean “Diddy” Combs as Dr. Jinx

Whenever Sean “Diddy” Combs pops up in a movie or TV show, he often plays a fictionalized version of himself. In It’s Always Sunny, he plays the unorthodox Dr. Jinx who utilizes alternative methods to treat his patients.

Not only is the cameo distracting, but Combs’ performance is pretty flat. It almost seems like the actor is reading off cue cards, and when Dr. Jinx is seen playing the bass guitar during a musical performance at Paddy’s Pub, it’s pretty obvious that Combs isn’t actually playing. The rapper may have stolen the show as Sergio in Get Him to the Greek, but whatever worked for him on that movie isn’t back on display in the sitcom.

11 Saved: Artemis Pebdani as Artemis

Artemis is one of the few supporting characters who can actually hang with the Gang without her life coming apart at the seams. She first appeared up in season one, where she befriends Dee after the two meet in an acting class. She’s also had a relationship without Frank throughout her time in the series.

The character is portrayed by Artemis Pebdani, who landed the role right at the start of her professional acting career.

While she’s continued to reprise her part as the fun-loving and wild Artemis, the actress has enjoyed success in a number of other shows, including Scandal and Masters of Sex. Though a number of supporting characters seem to have fallen off in recent years, Artemis has already popped up this season with “The Gang Beats Boggs: Ladies Reboot”.

10 Saved: Lynne Marie Stewart and Sandy Martin as Charlie and Mac’s Moms

Every since Danny DeVito debuted as Frank Reynolds, it was abundantly clear why Dennis and Dee are they way that they are. After all, Frank is just as self-absorbed and conniving as the twins. In that respect, we’ve also gotten to see how Mac and Charlie are a result of their childhoods by getting to know their moms over the course of the series.

Lynne Marie Stewart does a perfect job of playing Charlie’s mom, a kind-hearted woman who was far too overprotective of her son — which explains Charlie’s numerous irrational fears. Meanwhile, Sandy Martin is the total opposite, as Mac’s mom doesn’t seem emotionally invested in her son at all — which explains Mac’s constant desire for approval. Together, the two are a perfect comedy duo, which is on full display in “Old Lady House: A Comedy Situation”.

9 Hurt: Seann William Scott as Country Mac

In season nine, Seann William Scott made a one episode appearance as Mac’s cousin — who the Gang deems far cooler than Mac. Just like Jason Sudeikis as Schmitty, this is another star cameo that can’t help but feel distracting. Scott has made a career playing characters who are too cool for school thanks to movies like American Pie and Role Models. That might seem like he’s the ideal fit for Country Mac.

Wouldn’t it have been even funnier if the Gang idolized a character for no other reason than to get under Mac’s skin?

With the success of It’s Always Sunny, we’re sure that they could have a star cameo every few episodes. Since they’re kept to a bare minimum, it seems that even they know these roles can be a bit ostentatious.

8 Saved: Jimmi Simpson and Nate Mooney as Liam and Ryan McPoyle

The McPoyles are the perfect example of just how dark and twisted the humor on It’s Always Sunny can actually get. They are a large inbred family with the two most prominent members, Liam and Ryan, being former classmates of the Gang. They popped up in a number of episodes between seasons one and nine, where they’re often at odds with the owners of Paddy’s Pub.

Liam and Ryan are played by Jimmi Simpson and Nate Mooney throughout their time on the show. Both fully commit to the unsettling nature of these characters. They might be creepy, but that doesn’t stop them from being a hilarious comedy duo. Our only complaint is that they’ve been absent from the series for the last few seasons.

7 Saved: Catherine Reitman as Maureen Ponderosa

One of the weirdest characters in all of It’s Always Sunny, Maureen Ponderosa is the ex-wife of Dennis Reynolds who slowly makes her transition into becoming a cat in the later episodes of the show. Much like Rickety Cricket, her transition from seemingly normal to totally unhinged takes place over the course of a few seasons — better-allowing audiences to buy into the ridiculousness of it all.

Catherine Reitman seems totally devoted to this outlandish and often unsettling performance.

Since appearing on the show, Reitman’s notoriety has only continued to grow. She currently plays the lead on Workin’ Moms — a show which she also created — along with popping up as another recurring character in Black-ish.

6 Hurt: Guillermo del Toro as Pappy McPoyle

Writer/ director Guillermo del Toro was apparently such a big fan of It’s Always Sunny, that it was one of the reasons he cast Charlie Day in Pacific Rim. In return, del Toro was given this cameo appearance as Pappy McPoyle — who is most likely the grandfather of Liam and Ryan.

One problem right off the bat is that del Toro was cast to play someone who is most likely from Ireland— a fact which the director himself made fun of in a behind-the-scenes interview. This may have been the reason that Pappy McPoyle was given such an over-the-top appearance, which is really the worst part of the character. The McPoyle’s are indeed odd and unsettling, but they’re still somewhat believable.Pappy McPoyle, on the other hand, looks like some deranged wizard who has no place in the series.

5 Saved: Wade Boggs as Himself

The best episodes of It’s Always Sunny usually finds the Gang confined to a single area, where their personalities can do nothing but bounce off the walls and wreak havoc on themselves and anyone in their vicinity. This is what makes “The Gang Beats Boggs” one of the best episodes in the series.

The episode finds the five Philadelphia natives trying to beat Wade Boggs’ record of consuming 70 drinks during a cross-country flight.

While the Gang’s antics are usually based on nothing but nonsense, this true story only adds another level of hilarity to the episodes. The cherry on top is a brief appearance by Wade Boggs himself. In an interview, Charlie Day said that not only was Boggs happy to participate in the episode, but that his real-life record was a lot more impressive than previously thought.

4 Saved: Michael Naughton as the Waiter

Michael Naughton first appeared up in “The Gang Dines Out,” where he is a server at one of the finest restaurants in Philadelphia. He’s crossed paths with the Gang a number of times since, and every time the Waiter emerges worse for wear.

Just this season, Naughton appeared in “The Gang Beats Boggs: Ladies Reboot,” where he is now working as a flight attendant. Once again, the Waiter tries to get the Gang to acknowledge how they’ve sabotaged him in the past. But once again, the Gang can’t remember who he is.

Naughton plays the Waiter with a kind of obsessive desperation beneath his everyman facade; he seems like someone who really would let the Gang get the better of him. He’s also the kind of supporting character that rewards loyal fans every time he pops back up.

3 Hurt: Stephen Collins as Bruce Mathis

Stephen Collins popped up in season two and three of It’s Always Sunny, where he played Bruce Mathis, the biological father of Dennis and Dee. Bruce invests most of his time and money helping out various charities around the world, making him a polar opposite of his children. This also made Collins — who was best known for playing Reverend Eric Camden on 7th Heaven — seem like an ideal fit for the part.

In the years since, Collins has both been accused and admitted to being an abuser. The actor has obviously not appeared on the show since, but going back and watching these episodes with Collins can be more than a little discomfiting.

2 Saved: Kaitlin Olson as Dee Reynolds

With Rob McElhenney, Charlie Day, and Glenn Howerton working on the show right from the very beginning, the actors were afforded the opportunity to mold their characters as they saw fit. However, the character of Dee Reynolds was developed before an actress was cast, and she was originally meant to be the Gang’s voice of reason.

Thankfully, Kaitlin Olson nabbed the role, and over time Dee became just as hilariously pathetic as the other members of the Gang.

Being a former member of The Groundlings, Olson clearly had talent as a comedic performer — which might also explain why Dee fancies herself as a bit of an improv comic. The actress isn’t afraid to make Dee as embarrassing as possible, which adds an element of cringe-comedy to the show that’s not found in the other characters.

1 Saved: Rob McElhenney as Mac

Without Rob McElhenney, there would be no It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. The struggling actor/writer decided to put plans for the series into motion after a number of other projects fell through. With the help of Glenn Howerton and Charlie Day, McElhenney made a short episode of the series, which he used to pitch the sitcom. Over a decade later, McElhenney still serves as an executive produces while continuing to write a number of episodes.

As far as his role of Mac is concerned, McElhenney isn’t afraid to take the character in different directions.

He put on a whopping 50 pounds for season seven and Mac finally came out of the closet for good last year — just a few of the many ways McElhenney has kept the show feeling fresh after thirteen seasons.

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Who’s your favorite actor on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia? Let us know!



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2018-10-07 02:10:26 – Dylan Dembrow

Chris Evans to Produce and Star in Apple Legal Thriller Series Defending Jacob

Captain America actor Chris Evans attempts to jump over to the small screen on Apple’s new legal thriller Defending Jacob. Evans will both star in and produce the tech giant’s new series.

Adding to the list of companies seeking to highlight their own original content, Apple is preparing to release their own wave of programming. Back in 2017, news of Apple’s investment in content creation emerged, and now fans are soon to witness the realization of that investment: Apple original series and films. Apple’s rollout of original content features a roster full of star power, including Kristen Wiig, M. Night Shyamalan, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston, Ronald D. Moore, and now, the MCU’s Steve Rogers himself.

Related: Avengers 4 Reshoots: Chris Evans Reveals Return to Classic Captain America Look

The Wrap reported Evans’ decision to try his hand at executive producing, while also starring in Defending Jacob. The series is based on a novel – published in 2012 – about a father wrestling with accusations of murder brought against his teenage son. Evans will presumably portray the father, and the casting of the teenage son has yet to be announced. The book was widely acclaimed at the time of its publishing, becoming a New York Times best seller. Mark Bomback (War for the Planet Of The Apes) will take the reigns as showrunner.

This role will be a new and unexpected one for Evans, whose career was rocketed into the stratosphere by his work with Marvel Studios, although that commitment has limited his time when it comes to starring in non-superhero projects. Cap was of course left alive after Thanos’ fateful snap in Avengers: Infinity War, and Evans is set to reprise the role in the still untitled Avengers 4. It’ll be Evans’ seventh (outside of one-scene cameos) appearance as the iconic character, but he’s also confirmed that it’ll be his final portrayal of the hero.

Defending Jacob could mark a new beginning for Evans as well as Apple, with the tech company moving into the world of original content while the Marvel lead moves on to a more austere role. Apple would be remiss to not acknowledge the successes and failures of fellow streaming sites in the quest to create positively received original content. Likewise, Evans, should look toward actors who successfully pivoted away from the typecasting that often follows a role in fandom-heavy films. Altogether, Defending Jacob, has been set-up for success. Only time will tell if Apple’s tech products are the only high quality thing they can produce.

More: Avengers 4: The Biggest Reveals From The Leaked Art

Source: The Wrap



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2018-09-20 05:09:34 – Gabby Means