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Avengers: Endgame Trailer Recut in the Style of Logan is Heartbreaking

As if the trailer for Avengers: Endgame wasn’t emotional enough, a fan had to go and edit it in the style of Logan, set to Johnny Cash’s “Hurt.” There have been many deeply emotional moments during the MCU’s 20-film (to date) run, including Steve Rogers’ decision to sacrifice himself to stop Red Skull’s plan in Captain America: The First Avenger, Tony Stark’s realization that The Winter Soldier murdered his parents in Captain America: Civil War, and T’Challa encountering his ancestors in the afterlife in Black Panther. Of course, the MCU experienced a whole new level of sadness when Thanos snapped so many of its heroes out of existence at the end of Avengers: Infinity War.

While from the looks of it, Avengers: Endgame will do its best to tug at viewers’ heartstrings, it’s hard to imagine any potential Marvel moment sadder than a shocked Tony Stark cradling a terrified Peter Parker as he slowly turns to dust. Naturally, that ending left fans absolutely clamoring for footage from the project formerly known as Avengers 4 in the many months since Infinity War’s release, and this past Friday, Endgame’s trailer finally arrived.

Related: Avengers: Endgame – NASA Responds to Fans Demanding They Help Tony Stark

The fan reaction to Avengers: Endgame’s trailer has been almost entirely positive so far, with the footage serving to fuel some fan theories, kill off others, and tease a world deeply damaged by Thanos’ genocidal actions. Its scenes of Captain America crying and Tony Stark making peace with the fact that he’s going to soon die in space also left many shell-shocked. Well, those fans should get ready to feel even worse, as Youtube creator Mr. Krepshus has taken it upon himself to re-cut the Avengers: Endgame trailer in the style of Logan’s iconic trailer, complete with Johnny Cash’s classic cover of Nine Inch Nails’ song “Hurt.” The result is truly heartbreaking. Check it out below.

This emotional fan edit of the Avengers: Endgame trailer is a bit shorter than the official version, although that’s seemingly due to the cuts between footage here coming at a faster pace. To add to the overall melancholy vibe of this version, the creator even opted to add in older footage of Steve watching Bucky vanish in Infinity War, Thor in happier times with Loki during Thor: Ragnarok, and Hawkeye hugging his children from Avengers: Age of Ultron, all of which are contrasted with those heroes looking despondent in shots from Endgame.

While one assumes most (if not all) of the heroes dusted by Thanos in Infinity War will be resurrected before the end of Avengers 4, there’s no guarantees. There’s also no guarantees that beloved characters like Iron Man, Captain America, and Thor will survive the final battle against Thanos. All fans can do is hope that their favorites make it, because as Tony says in the Avengers: Endgame trailer, part of the journey is the end.

More: Avengers: Endgame Trailer Breakdown – 30 Story Reveals & Secrets You Missed

Source: Mr. Krepshus/YouTube



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2018-12-10 01:12:03

18 Best Sequels, According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%)

We live in an age where sequels are all the rage. Every major studio is chasing those franchises that can keep their cash flow healthy for years to come. Sometimes, they’re exhausting. Other times, they can be our most anticipated movies. Maybe we could do without more Transformers movies, but Marvel and Mission: Impossible sequels are event movies that drive us to the theater in droves.

Sequels are tricky and unpredictable, though. On one hand, they’re often necessary for expanding stories and the good ones continue sagas we want to see progress. On the other, some are soulless cash grabs that shouldn’t exist. In the worst cases, some of them completely derail promising franchises by failing to deliver the goods. Then again, in some instances, sequels can get a series back up and running after they’ve experienced setbacks.

This list will look at those rare sequels that are considered worthy — and even superior — follow-ups. Those rare beasts that make us grateful for multiple movies in a series. Furthermore, we’ll also be discussing the most maligned sequels that brought no critical good will to their respective franchises whatsoever. It’s more fun this way. In order to fully appreciate the best of the best, we also must acknowledge the worst of the worst. Without evil, we wouldn’t be able to understand all that’s good and pure. Without terrible movies, we wouldn’t be grateful for the good ones.

With this in mind, here are 18 Best Sequels According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%).

26 Best: Captain America: Civil War (91%)

The decision to keep the same team of writers for all three Captain America films paid off in the end. The trilogy just went from strength to strength with each passing entry, though some would argue that The Winter Soldier is equally as good — if not better — than Civil War. Either way, they’re both prime examples of how to do sequels right.

Civil War tackles the same themes you’d expect from a movie about a do-gooder like Cap, but where the film truly soars is during its wild third act. The airport showdown is the best action showdown in the MCU, and that’s saying something.

25 Worst: The Bad News Bears Go To Japan (0%)

If you didn’t know that sequels to The Bad News Bears exist then no one would think any less of you. While the first movie is a cult classic about an underdog baseball team, the sequels have faded from the collective memory with the passing of time, lost like tears in the rain. That’s for good reason.

None of the sequels are good, but The Bad News Bears Go To Japan is especially bad.

While the idea to relocate to Japan for a big game is good on paper, the sequel is just bland, forgettable, and was made to cash in on the brand name.

24 Best: Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens (93%)

Some fans argue that The Force Awakens is essentially a retread of A New Hope in many ways. However, clearly the critics and audiences didn’t necessarily agree, given its stellar Rotten Tomatoes score and its audience score of 87%, not to mention its impressive box office haul.

As far as Star Wars movies go, it hits the spot. The new characters are great, the return of some old faces is a trip down memory lane, and the story still made significant effort to push the franchise forward. In those regards, the film definitely succeeded.

23 Best: War for the Planet of the Apes (93%)

Anyone who has a problem with classics being rebooted needs to watch the most recent Planet of the Apes trilogy.  The finale pits the apes in a brutal battle against the humans, which leads to an epic confrontation between the Caesar the Ape and humanity’s ruthless colonel (played by an utterly wicked Woody Harrelson). As far as concluding trilogies goes, War for the Planet of the Apes has everything.

By no means is this a pleasant movie, but it is rewarding. And not only does it wrap up an epic story, but the film boasts some of the great CGI wizardry out there. The action is also ridiculously impressive and compelling, which is crazy considering it’s a movie about people versus monkeys.

22 Best: Logan (93%)

James Mangold’s Logan, the gloriously violent and heartbreaking farewell to Patrick Stewart’s Professor X and Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine, is an all-timer. Taking cues from the Old Man Logan comics, the movie has just as much in common with neo-westerns as it does with superhero yarns, which makes for a gritty, character-driven elegy to characters many of us grew up with.

Logan deserves praise for going R-rated and taking some stylistic risks.

The movie is proof that audiences will still flock to see superhero movies with some edge. If you’re going to send off some icons, this is the way to do it.

21 Worst: Return to the Blue Lagoon (0%)

Considering that no one liked The Blue Lagoon (it currently holds a 9% rating on RT), why anyone would want to return to the franchise is beyond comprehension. Of course, every sequel is a perfect opportunity to right some old wrongs if handled with care. Unfortunately, this was not. The story follows two children who are marooned on a tropical island as the grow up and fall in love, etc. The characters don’t wear enough clothes either, which makes for some weird, uncomfortable viewing.

There are some unintentional laughs to be had at the poor script and performances.

Otherwise the Blue Lagoon isn’t a scenic cinematic paradise worth spending time in unless you want to punish yourself for some reason.

20 Best: The Dark Knight (94%)

Few superhero movies are ever regarded as anything more than popcorn fare. However, if there were ever a superhero movie that proved the genre could be prestige cinema, it would be The Dark Knight. Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman is an exploration of chaos and just how far people are willing to go to achieve their goal.

The Dark Knight — for better or worse when you consider how devoid of fun some DC movies have been since — also brought a gritty, realistic touch to the genre. The movie feels more like a Michael Mann crime saga than it does a story about superheroes versus their outlandishly evil counterparts.

19 Best: Finding Dory (94%)

In recent times, Pixar has been criticized for relying too heavily on sequels, but if it ain’t broke… Finding Dory was released 13 years after Finding Nemo, and it was a smash with critics and audiences alike.

Its 94% on Rotten Tomatoes is complemented by an 84% audience score.

Upon release Finding Dory was praised for being as funny and thought-provoking as the first movie, while also adding a new dimension to the story. As with any Pixar movie, Finding Dory can be appreciated by audiences of all ages. 

18 Worst: Staying Alive (0%)

No other actor on the planet has experienced a career of ups and downs like John Travolta has. When he broke out he had the world at his dancing feet. After that, his career experienced a downturn until it was resurrected briefly following Pulp Fiction until it ultimately plummeted when he started starring in movies like Battlefield Earth. Staying Alive was released in 1983 when Travolta was experiencing his first fall from grace. Following up a classic like Saturday Night Fever was never going to be easy, but it shouldn’t have been this difficult, either.

The sequel lacks the gritty realism of its predecessor, and instead tries to get by on dance sequences. What’s the point in dancing when we don’t care about who’s doing it?

17 Best: Creed (95%)

No franchise tends to remain compelling seven sequels in, but Creed is proof that the Rocky franchise is the rare exception. Granted, some Rocky movies aren’t exactly knockouts, but Creed got things back on track and showed that it’s game for a few more rounds.

By serving as both a sequel and a spin-off/soft reboot, Creed gave the franchise a breath of new life.

It passed the gloves on to Michael B. Jordan as the eponymous character.  Creed 2 is right around the corner. Let’s see if it can do what the original saga failed to do and deliver a second outing that’s as good as the inaugural entry.

16 Worst: Leprechaun 2 (0%)

The first Leprechaun movie doesn’t come close to being certified fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, so it should come as no surprise that the sequels didn’t receive any critical acclaim. Especially not the second movie, which no critic seemed to enjoy at all.

Here, the infamous critter resurfaces in Los Angeles to find a bride, which leads to him abducting a young woman and trying to claim her as his own. This isn’t high art by any means, nor does it try to be.

15 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (96%)

The Harry Potter books were an emotional roller coaster that affected millions of readers worldwide. Reliving those adventures on the big screen was also a great time to be alive, and the grand finale lived up to expectations. In the final installment of the saga about the Boy Who Lived and his fight against the forces of darkness, the ultimate showdown finally happens as our hero and his pals face off against Voldemort in Hogwarts castle.

It’s a true epic in every sense of the word.

As far as wrapping up the story goes, Death Hallows: Part 2 delivered the goods and gave us cinematic closure in style.

14 Worst: Looking Who’s Talking Now (0%)

Look Who’s Talking is a perfectly serviceable comedy that should never have received any sequels. In a bid to end to the trilogy on a high following the disappointing previous sequel, Look Who’s Talking Too, someone thought it would be a good idea to introduce talking dogs to the mix for the series’ swan song. 

Needless to say, Look Who’s Talking Now wasn’t the glorious goodbye the series was looking for, but at least the film did cast some cute dogs.

13 Best: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (97%)

The third installment of Sergio Leone’s influential Dollars trilogy, The Good, The Bad and the Ugly is the creme de la creme of spaghetti westerns. 

The story centers around two men who form an uneasy alliance following a scam.

This leads them on a quest as it turns out there’s money buried in the desert and they want to find it. However, they have to compete against another who won’t hesitate to put a bullet in them to claim the prize. On top of being one of the most acclaimed movies out there, the film has been hailed as a major influence on directors like Quentin Tarantino.

12 Best: The Godfather: Part II (97%)

The continuation of Francis Ford Coppola’s Best Picture-winning 1972 crime saga, The Godfather: Part II chronicles Michael Corleone’s further ascendency in organized crime while simultaneously taking us back to the past to explore his dad’s humble beginnings.

Like its predecessor, the sequel also won Best Picture and is hailed by many a critic and film buff as one of the best movies ever made. Whether it’s better than the original is up for debate, but they’re like two sides of the same coin. These movies set the bar for mob pictures, and to this day, other directors are still trying to recreate the formula.

11 Mad Max: Fury Road (97%)

Director George Miller was in his seventies when he unleashed Mad Max: Fury Road, but the energy and madness imbued in every frame of this extravaganza suggest a man half his age.

Maybe we’ll never see another Mad Max movie, but the world needs a Furiosa spin-off eventually.

Fury Road is essentially one non-stop chase that barely lets up from the get-go all the way to the climactic ending. Furthermore, it’s a movie that defied expectation by taking the focus away from the titular character and making Charlize Theron’s Furiosa the real hero of the adventure. 

10 Worst: Jaws: The Revenge (0%)

Is Jaws: the Revenge a good movie? Definitely not. Is it an entertaining movie, though? Definitely yes.

How many other movies have sharks that make a conscious decision to get revenge on the humans that wronged them? Not only that, but the shark here followed its target to the Bahamas from Massachusetts. And why would someone who wants to avoid sharks go to an island surrounded by ocean? The movie is illogical, silly, nonsense, but it does offer sheer entertainment value for bad movie buffs.

9 Best: Aliens (98%)

Alien and Aliens are quite different in some regards, but they complement each other perfectly. The first is an exercise in pure suspense and terror. The sequel, on the other hand, retains the horror elements but adds a lot more action to proceedings.

Aliens shows how to make a successful sequel: acknowledge what came before but don’t be afraid to bring some fresh ideas to the table.

James Cameron was on fire in the ’80s and he wasn’t afraid to make Ridley Scott’s baby his own.

8 Best: Mad Max 2: Road Warrior (98%)

While George Miller’s inaugural Mad Max caper is a cult classic, most film buffs would agree that a couple of the sequels are slightly superior. Taking nothing away from the first movie, Road Warrior is a vast improvement when it comes to world building and sheer action spectacle. The story follows the eponymous character as he helps a group of people steal oil from a tyrannical madman and his band of goons.

As far as cinematic thrill rides go, few movies are on par with Road Warrior. Here, Miller turned up the volume significantly by making the post-apocalyptic terrains feel more dangerous and the action sequences more gung-ho and grander in scale.

7 Best: Evil Dead 2 (98%)

Sam Raimi’s first Evil Dead movie was a huge achievement for independent filmmaking when it was released back in 1981. The movie still holds up to this day with its innovative camera work, effective scares, and excellent cast as well.

The sequel is a triumph in its own right.

While the first movie contained moments of dark comedy, the sequel amps up the zaniness to become what is essentially the splatter flick equivalent of a Laurel and Hardy flick. For 90 minutes, Bruce Campbell is tormented by laughing ornaments and his own severed hand. As silly as that sounds, Evil Dead 2 still manages to pack more punch than your average MMA fighter.

6 Worst: Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol (0%)

In the third installment of the Police Academy franchise, the cops are understaffed and in need of some help. Naturally, the force turns to America’s civilians to help aid in their mission. Things don’t go smoothly, for the characters in the film and the movie itself.

Rotten Tomatoes describes Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol as “Utterly, completely, thoroughly and astonishingly unfunny” and  a movie which sent “a once-innocuous franchise plummeting to agonizing new depths.” That sounds about right.

5 Toy Story 3 (99%)

Few franchises manage to strike three home runs in a row. Even The Godfather stuttered when it came to the third outing. Toy Story, on the other hand, never ceases to replicate the magic time and time again.

This emotional installment sees Andy get ready to leave for college and neglect his old toys.

He’s all grown up and has no use for them anymore, and what ensues is what is by far the most heartfelt movie in the series.

4 Worst: Highlander II: The Quickening (0%)

As far as pure entertaining action-fantasy goes, the first Highlander movie is a fun slice of popcorn entertainment that aficionados of cult cinema lose their head over. The sequel, meanwhile, is an incomprehensible mess.

Highlander II is too overplotted to explain, but the cusp of the story revolves around the hero from the first movie taking on a corporation after being led to believe that they don’t have the world’s best interests in mind. In this one, our hero is a defender of the ozone as well. What makes Highlander II so awful is that it completely retcons everything good about the original film and the mythology it introduced.

3 Best: The Bride of Frankenstein (100%)

We all desire to be loved by someone special– even bolt-head monsters made up of the remains of other people. But to find them a mate, one must dig up some more corpses and create a suitable partner that’s similar in genetic make-up. This is also the storyline behind James Whale’s 1935 masterpiece, Bride of Frankenstein.

There are too many Frankenstein movies to keep track of at this point, but this sequel remains the pinnacle of the original series.

The movie is a masterpiece that successfully blends campy fun with Gothic beauty and genuine chills that’s stood the test of time as a result.

2 Paddington 2 (100%)

No one expected the the first Paddington to be as good as it is. That movie is a bona fide classic in the making in its own right, but the sequel is some next-next level brilliance.

Paddington 2 sees the lovable bear go to prison and, unsurprisingly, all the mean criminals fall in love with him as well. Critics, like the fictional convicts, were also full of praise for the titular bear and his second big onscreen adventure as well. At one point, Paddington 2 was even the best reviewed movie in history.

1 Best: Toy Story 2 (100%)

Following up a movie like Toy Story was never going to be easy, but that didn’t stop Pixar from trying and succeeding. In this one, we find out that Woody is a collectible when he’s discovered and stolen by a greedy museum owner. Naturally this prompts Buzz Lightyear, Mr. Potato, and the rest of the gang into action and they set out to save their friend.

General consensus on Rotten Tomatoes states that Toy Story 2 is that rare sequel that improves upon its predecessor.

The sequel raises the stakes and ups the element of adventure while retaining the humor and heart that made audiences fall in love with the franchise in the first place.

What’s your favorite sequel? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-10 04:10:39 – Kieran Fisher

Dark Phoenix Director Apologizes for X-Men: The Last Stand

Dark Phoenix director Simon Kinberg apologizes for botching Fox’s first attempt at adapting Chris Claremont’s Dark Phoenix saga in X-Men: The Last Stand. A longtime producer of Fox’s X-Men films, Kinberg also wrote the Brett Ratner-directed movie, alongside Zak Penn. The film was the final installment in the series’ initial continuity, before it was rebooted by Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class.

Specific narrative points are still being kept under wraps, but people involved in Dark Phoenix are hyping it up, including Sophie Turner (Jean Grey/Phoenix), who promised fans that it will revolutionize the superhero genre. Meanwhile, Jennifer Lawrence (Raven/Mystique) dubbed it her best X-Men experience. The movie is set to be the last Fox-controlled X-Men film before rights to the mutants, alongside all their tie-in characters, return to Marvel Entertainment after the Disney and Fox merger is finalized.

Related: Why Fox Is Making a Second Dark Phoenix Saga Adaptation

Speaking with EW as he continues to promote Dark Phoenix, Kinberg apologized for Fox’s first attempt to adapt the quintessential storyline from the comics back in 2006. Considering that he was a pivotal part of The Last Stand, the first-time director also assures fans that this time, they made sure to stick to the source material as closely as possible. Kinberg previously named Logan and the original Star Wars trilogy – as well as other MCU cosmic-set films – as influences on his upcoming movie, but following his apology, he specifically named Taika Waititi’s Thor: Ragnarok as another significant inspiration.

“I’m sorry for X-Men 3. We tried to tell the Dark Phoenix story and we didn’t do it properly. So, with this Dark Phoenix story there is no ‘cure’ plot, there is no other plot. It is the Dark Phoenix story, as told in comics, as told in the cartoons. Sophie is the center of the film, that’s why she’s the one person that’s in the teaser poster. The entire movie revolves around her. It’s a movie that goes into space and is cosmic, very much inspired actually by what [Taika] did with Thor — even though the tone is totally different — but just the ability to make a character movie that still feels grounded, and fun, but is in whole other universes. Jessica Chastain’s character plays an alien, and that’s all I can tell you about that. But, yeah, it’s the Dark Phoenix story and if you’ve read that comic I think you’re going to like the movie a lot.

Admittedly, not many were initially sold on the idea of retelling the same print narrative, especially since Fox could’ve gone with other storylines that have never been translated to the big screen. It didn’t help that Dark Phoenix‘s release has been pushed back a few times, alongside rumors that the reshoots were to alter a huge chunk of the movie. Over the years, the term “reshoots” has developed a negative connotation after being associated with problem-laded productions, that said, reshoots have always been mandatory, especially for blockbusters.

While the film’s first trailer didn’t necessarily squash people’s concerns that Dark Phoenix will be just an updated version of The Last Stand, the buzz surrounding the event-exclusive footage shown at NYCC may sway naysayers to give the movie a fair shot. Those who were lucky enough to see the preview raved about the chemistry of the established X-Men team before Jean’s change of heart. From the looks of it, Kinberg’s apology may not just be lip service, assuming the forthcoming mutant-centered movie blows everyone away.

More: Dark Phoenix NYCC Footage Description: How Jean Grey Becomes Phoenix

Source: EW



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2018-10-06 08:10:05 – Ana Dumaraog

How MCU Cosmic Movies Allowed X-Men To Adapt Dark Phoenix Properly

During a panel at New York Comic Con, screenwriter and producer Simon Kinberg explained how Marvel Studios’ dip into intergalactic fare set the stage for the latest X-Men cinematic installment, Dark Phoenix. Directed by Kinberg, the film will tackle one of the most famous stories from the X-Men’s extensive comic canon as it traces the rise and fall of Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) as her immensely powerful alter-ego, the Phoenix.

The original comic book story by Chris Claremont, Dave Cockrum, and John Byrne featured a distinct science fiction tone. After an accident in outer space exposed her to a strange flare of cosmic radiation, Jean’s powers increased exponentially, making her one of the most powerful beings on the planet. Despite Professor X’s best efforts, the power drove her insane and made her a target of a powerful extraterrestrial race, the Shi’ar Empire. The third film in the first X-Men series, X-Men: The Last Stand, adapted some of this storyline, but left out the space-related material, resulting in a less-than-satisfying adaptation of the beloved original.

Related: Here’s How Old The X-Men Are Supposed To Be In Dark Phoenix

According to Kinberg, two recent trends in Marvel movies had a significant impact on the culmination of the reboot series that began with X-Men: First Class. He cites Logan as an influence on the film’s dark dramatic themes, but also the success of the MCU’s cosmic films as preparation to expand the X-Men universe.

“What Marvel Studios has done in terms of making these movies extraterrestrial, taking them into space with Guardians [of the Galaxy], with Thor: Ragnarok, with the Avengers movies, allowed for us to tell the Dark Phoenix story not just in the dramatic, grounded emotional ways that we’re talking about… but to also go to outer space, to have alien characters.”

Fox also premiered some new footage of Dark Phoenix at NYCC, which backs up Kinberg’s description. Most likely coming early in the film, the scenes show the X-Men attempting to rescue a group of astronauts whose shuttle has gone out of control. While the attempt is mostly successful, it results in Jean’s exposure to cosmic radiation, following the similar setup from Claremont’s comics.

That’s a reassuring sign after the all-around disappointment of X-Men: The Last Stand. Adventures in outer space have been part of the X-Men’s repertoire for decades, and it’s about time that the films started to reflect that. So far there’s been no confirmation of whether the Shi’ar will appear in the story. It’s possible that the as-yet-unnamed character played by Jessica Chastain will fill that role, but Kinberg has only hinted that she’s not “from our planet.”

With the upcoming move to Marvel Studios, this is likely to be the X-Men’s swan song at Fox (excepting perhaps the more removed The New Mutants). Despite delays that pushed the premiere back to next year, Kinberg seems confident that they’ve finally brought one of the definitive X-Men stories to the big screen in the manner it deserves. Time will tell if they’ve got it right this time.

More: Your Guide To The Best Panels At New York Comic Con 2018

Source: Simon Kinberg



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2018-10-05 08:10:23 – Michael Heerema

Ethan Hawke Clarifies Logan Comments & Praises Superhero Movies

Ethan Hawke has clarified the previous comments he made about Logan and has gone on to praise superhero movies. Last month, the actor criticized James Mangold’s acclaimed superhero film, which many found to be among the best films of 2017, and said it was not the great production that many claimed it was. His comments caused a huge debate over social media, with many lashing out against his opinions.

Even though a year has passed since it was first released, Logan is a film that is still regularly discussed by those who are both in and outside of superhero fandom circles. It is celebrated for its ambitious and compelling storyline that is inspired more by classic Westerns than superhero films. Mangold’s take on Wolverine was even the first film of the comic book genre to gain an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. Yet despite all of the praise surrounding the movie, Hawke disagreed with the popular opinion in August when he claimed that it was a good superhero movie but not great, which is what the studios want people to think.

Related: Why Logan Received An Oscar Nomination, According To James Mangold

Hawke discussed the controversy in a recent interview with Collider. When asked how he felt about the fierce social media debate his comments sparked, Hawke said he was encouraged by people’s comments and explained:

“But you know, one of the things that’s cool about that is that’s because for a long time – I thought about this for a little bit – for a long time, comic books and people who cared about comic books were ghetto-ized. And it was made to feel small. And now they run the table. And there’s been this giant switch in my lifetime, I mean, like I am a comic book geek, I’ve seen all those [movies]. The idea that I’m the one criticizing them is a joke, because I – there’s very few things I enjoy more – this is something I teach my son – that something about being a geek is being real. That’s what it means: I’m gonna be real.”

Later on in the interview, Hawke clarified that he “was talking about a much more nuanced point about money and America” with his initial comments, and he wasn’t aiming to tear down Mangold’s film with what he said. Hawke’s critique of the Hollywood system and its constant production of superhero films because of the profit they bring in caused some in the film community to argue that Hawke was actually right. The heated debate between the two “sides” – those who supported Logan and claimed it was one of the genre’s strongest films versus those who thought Hawke had something compelling to say – sparked a conversation over the state of the film industry.

While some would argue Hawke had no place to make those comments, others would say the conversation it started was an important one. Hawke is a filmmaker and actor who has traditionally valued being grounded and authentic, both as a person and in his work, and it was this philosophy that led him to criticize Logan in the first place, as he thought the film and comic book films in general were too commercialized to be great movies. With his new comments, Hawke appears as though he’s reconsidered the whole superhero film genre and realizes that there are important links between being “real” and the genre he previously criticized, adding more complexities to the ongoing debate. No matter what people’s opinions may be on his initial comments, Hawke, at the very least, inspired an impassioned debate within the comic book movie fanbase, as well as the film community at large, over what constitutes a good film versus a bad one.

More: Ryan Reynolds Still Wants A Deadpool & Wolverine Movie

Source: Collider



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2018-09-30 02:09:01 – Caitlin Leale

Ethan Hawke Slams Logan, Says It Isn’t A Great Movie



Actor Ethan Hawke criticized Logan in a recent interview, claiming that the last film starring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine wasn’t such a great movie after all. James Mangold’s Logan took audiences by storm in 2017, winning over those who were both fervent fans of the superhero genre and those who were usually apathetic towards it.

Logan was a breath of fresh air to many moviegoers, who enjoyed Mangold’s efforts at making an ambitious Wolverine film that was inspired more-so by Westerns and classic American cinema than comic books. It set box office records during its run in theaters, and was the first superhero film to have a serious Oscar campaign, garnering a number of other prestigious award nominations in the process. Many industry experts thought the film had a good chance at winning in its nominated category of Best Adapted Screenplay.

Related: Why Don’t Superhero Movies Win Oscars? 

But Ethan Hawke tends to disagree with the majority of favorable assessments of Logan. In an interview with The Film Stage, Hawke talked about Logan and how the Hollywood machine tried to sell the film as one of the major greats in recent film memory.

Now we have the problem that they tell us Logan is a great movie. Well, it’s a great superhero movie. It still involves people in tights with metal coming out of their hands. It’s not Bresson. It’s not Bergman. But they talk about it like it is. I went to see Logan cause everyone was like, “This is a great movie” and I was like, “Really? No, this is a fine superhero movie.” There’s a difference but big business doesn’t think there’s a difference. Big business wants you to think that this is a great film because they wanna make money off of it.

Hawke has always been a proponent of independent cinema, and tends to prefer more intimate projects, having starred in some of the film industry’s most iconic indies, including Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy and Boyhood. His recent film First Reformed and upcoming feature film Blaze, which Hawke wrote and directed, have confirmed that Hawke is one of the best creative forces in independent film right now. With his preferences towards grounded drama, some might think that he would be a big fan of Logan, a film that James Mangold said he wrote to be more “dramatic and character-driven” than other superhero movies. But Hawke’s critical comments on Logan make it clear that he’s not a very big fan of Mangold’s film, regardless of the director’s efforts to make it more of a drama than a superhero action movie.

Hawke’s biggest criticisms of Logan seem to be aimed more at the larger issues that exist within Hollywood rather than the film itself. Elsewhere in the same interview, Hawke critiqued the “phoniness” of the film industry’s awards system, and suggested that awards aren’t a good indicator of a movie’s worth, despite everybody’s obsession over them. It appears as though Hawke’s comments simply come from an actor who’s frustrated with what Logan represents for him: the huge issue of Hollywood’s system being run as a big business with profit as the foremost concern over artistic value. However, regardless of the systemic critiques he was trying to point out, there’s no doubt that Hawke’s comments are going to cause some heated debate within the superhero film fan base.

Next: Ethan Hawke Adapting The Good Lord Bird For TV With Blumhouse

Source: The Film Stage



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