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Wonder Woman’s Patty Jenkins Teases Ryan Murphy Over AHS: 1984 Title

After Ryan Murphy officially announced that the next season of American Horror Story would be subtitled “1984,” Wonder Woman 1984 director Patty Jenkins couldn’t help but call him out. Though the franchises clearly have no connective threads whatsoever, Jenkins found American Horror Story’s title announcement amusing.

The follow-up to 2016’s debut for the Princess of Themyscira, Wonder Woman 1984 follows the titular DC hero to the mid ’80s, where she’ll do battle against the villainous Cheetah (Kristen Wiig), while also confronting other characters, including Steve Trevor (Chris Pine). As for American Horror Story: 1984, the new season is a follow-up to American Horror Story: Apocalypse, and it appears to pivot around the slasher genre – namely slasher movies from the 1980s. Now, the two projects share the same subtitle, and even though neither has anything to do with the other, Patty Jenkins still found reason to point out the similarities to American Horror Story co-creator Ryan Murphy.

Related: What to Expect from American Horror Story Season 9

Jenkins jokingly tweeted at Murphy, admiring the title for American Horror Story’s upcoming season. However, while the tweet begins with admiration, Jenkins catches herself mid-sentence, noting the fact that they’re both using the same subtitle for their respective projects. Murphy then replied to Jenkins, suggesting that Wonder Woman 1984’s title isn’t original either, citing George Orwell’s novel, 1984. Check out their exchange below:

As for the 1984 reference, Orwell’s 1984 is a 1949 novel that imagines a dystopian future in which war and government surveillance is the new norm. There have been a handful of adaptations – including one that was actually released in 1984 – and Paul Greengrass was originally attached to direct his own adaptation until it fell through. Now, it’s evident that both Wonder Woman: 1984 and American Horror Story: 1984 may draw inspiration from Orwell’s novel in one form or another.

Both the Wonder Woman sequel and ninth season of American Horror Story will be airing within months of each other, so it’ll be interesting to see how the two fictional worlds will depict the ’80s. In terms of possible inspiration, the superhero genre in 1984 included films like The Toxic Avenger and Supergirl – so it wasn’t exactly a golden age for the genre – while the horror genre in 1984 had films like A Nightmare on Elm Street, Firestarter, Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter, and C.H.U.D. (the latter of which was more than just a throwaway reference in Jordan Peele’s Us). Aside from Orwell’s source material, it won’t be long till fans see how these two franchises put the ’80s to good creative use.

More: 10 Facts We Already Know About Wonder Woman 1984

Source: Patty Jenkins, Ryan Murphy



2019-04-12 08:04:23

Danny Salemme

ANNA Official Trailer (2019) Cillian Murphy, Luc Besson Action Movie HD



ANNA Official Trailer (2019) Cillian Murphy, Luc Besson, Sasha Luss, Luke Evans Action Movie HD
© 2019 – Summit

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2019-04-10 21:29:58

Quiet Place 2: Cillian Murphy in Talks to Join Sequel

Cillian Murphy is in talks to join A Quiet Place 2. The first film in the series from actor-turned-director John Krasinski was something of a surprise smash hit, bringing in over $300 million on an astonishing $17 million budget. Since then, a sequel has been announced, with both Krasinski and co-star Emily Blunt returning.

A big part of the reason for A Quiet Place’s success was its highly unique concept, in which a family struggles to survive after the earth’s population has been decimated by a breed of alien creatures that hunt based on sound. Reduced to having to communicate by whispers and sign language, Krasinski’s character Lee Abbott and his pregnant wife Evelyn (Blunt) rig their rural home with numerous traps and precautions to safeguard their young family. With filming on the sequel reportedly set for this summer, casting rumors have begun to crop up and fans of the original are eager to see exactly who will be joining Krasinski and Blunt this time around.

Related: How A Quiet Place 2 Will Differ From Jaws & Alien Sequels

The latest name currently being circulated for the sequel according to THR is Cillian Murphy. The Irish star is reportedly in talks to join A Quiet Place 2 as a mysterious stranger who joins the Abbott family as they continue to struggle with life on a planet that has been drastically altered from its present state.

Should Murphy officially commit to the upcoming project, it will mark the sequel’s first confirmed new cast member. Previous reports have revealed that child actors Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe will return as the children of Lee and Evelyn, but to date there have been no brand new additions to the cast. As Krasinski – who once again took on scripting duties for the film – has previously mentioned, A Quiet Place 2 may be more open to explore the lives of other survivors beyond the Abbot family. If this is indeed the case, then the inclusion of Murphy could be reflective of the plot, by creating a potentially new hazard for the Abbott family to deal with. Should that be the case, Murphy is indeed an excellent choice to play a villain, with past experience as super villain The Scarecrow in Christopher Nolan’s Batman films.

Sequels to highly successful films are often fraught with risk. Not that all films aren’t filled with a great degree of uncertainty, but this characteristic is typically amplified when the characters and concepts are already familiar to audiences. After making such an impact with the first film, Krasinski definitely has his work cut out for him. The upside to all this, however, is that it is in fact, Krasinski who has once again written the screenplay and who will be returning to the director’s chair. All too often, problems arise when the mastermind behind a successful film’s sequel isn’t involved at any level beyond producing. With this in mind and the potential inclusion of a great actor like Cillian Murphy, A Quiet Place 2 could indeed make some serious noise.

More: The Best Horror Movies of 2018

Source: THR


2019-03-29 07:03:59

Mike Jones

Ryan Murphy Says Coven Witches Will Return to American Horror Story

American Horror Story co-creator Ryan Murphy hinted that the witches from American Horror Story: Coven will return in future episodes of the hit anthology TV show. American Horror Story: Coven was the central theme of the third season in the series.

Over its eight-season run thus far, the widely acclaimed horror series has done its best to tap into viewers’ deepest, darkest fears – from witches, demons, and clowns to hospitals, insane asylums, and the apocalypse. Set in 2013, American Horror Story: Coven follows the descendants of witches who survived the Salem Witch Trials and the struggle they face to keep their identity hidden in modern times. This includes setting up an all-girls boarding school in New Orleans to help isolate and protect young witches from religious townspeople, witch hunters, and angry mobs. Coven was a clear fan favorite, boasting the highest average number of viewers per episode over a full season at 4 million and an 83 percent “fresh” critics score on Rotten Tomatoes. Now, audiences can expect to see more of its characters in the future.

Related: American Horror Story: 25 Behind-The-Scenes Photos That Completely Change Everything

In an interview with Entertainment Tonight following a ceremony in which Murphy was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the do-it-all creator hinted at the future of the horror franchise by saying, “The witches will be back.” He was quick to add that he did not mean the witches would return next season, but rather at some point down the line. There was, however, a crossover between some of the characters of Coven and the most recent season American Horror Story: Apocalypse, wherein the witches attempt to save humanity from global destruction.

While every season of American Horror Story essentially offers a new storyline and characters, Murphy retains many of the same actors, providing a sense of continuity. For American Horror Story: Apocalypse, Murphy built further familiarity into the crossover season by involving characters from both season 1, American Horror Story: Murder House, and season 3, American Horror Story: Coven. This was originally supposed to be 2019’s season 9, but they moved it up and will instead be starting with something fresh. Whether the next witch appearance includes central characters like Sarah Paulson’s school headmistress Cordelia Foxx and Taissa Farmiga’s Zoe Benson remains to be seen.

A clear winner from a critical reception and commercial success standpoint, it’s not surprising to see Murphy and the American Horror Story team wanting to explore the Coven storyline further and milking it for all it’s worth. The only fear, aside from the tricks of the series itself, is that too much of a good thing can ruin even the best show. It’ll be interesting to see if they successfully avoid this pitfall or end up jinxing themselves.

More: 20 Things Everyone Gets Wrong About American Horror Story

Source: ET Online



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2018-12-06 04:12:50

20 Things Wrong With American Horror Story We All Choose To Ignore

The horror anthology hit TV show American Horror Story just might be the magnum opus of Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuck. Scarier and more riveting than any of the duo’s other projects, the spine-tingling series features a new theme and characters every season that are all still linked to each other’s universe. From the casting announcements to the series hints, theme reveals, and each season’s unique introductory visuals, it’s riveting entertainment all around. Even so, some seasons fall further off the mark than others, with many episodes barely even registering on the “horror” radar while others left us scratching our heads wondering what the heck just happened.

The thing is, we tend to give glaring errors, plot flops, and other things wrong with the show a pass because we love it so much. From intriguing horror to irresistible characters, from unexpected plot twists to some of the best storytelling on TV, American Horror Story keeps us coming back, not because it’s flawless but because it’s still addictive despite, and sometimes because of, its many flaws.

We might love a character and conveniently forget that he or she is a monster. We’ll keep tuning in even after an entire sequence left us feeling disgusted, embarrassed for the actress who had to play out the scene, or even angry at the creators themselves. It’s just that addictive.

We love it and we’ll keep coming back for me, even with these 20 Things Wrong With American Horror Story We All Choose To Ignore.

20 Some Seasons Aren’t Scary

With a name like American Horror Story, you might expect every episode to be a scream-fest. That’s just not the case, especially in seasons four and five. While there’s no shortage of horror-inducing characters in these seasons, they didn’t really give us nightmares like previous and subsequent seasons were able to do.

Were we jaded from all the mutants, ghosts, zombies, and other creatures in previous seasons?

Both Freak Show and Hotel fell short on promises of terror, often vying for more intense drama (a calling card of Falchuck and Murphy) instead. While we still received interesting stories, Gaga’s vampire and Twisty the Clown just weren’t all that scary.

19 There’s No Reason Given For All The Hotel Vampire Kids

In season five, Hotel, Lady Gaga’s character, The Countess Elizabeth, is a little less fabulous than we expected her to be. Perhaps she couldn’t live up to the Gaga we all know and love already. One of the things that just made zero sense about the character was her propensity to collect children and turn them into little vampires. Does Elizabeth have an old woman in the shoe complex? Is she just that bored? What is the point?

Here’s the thing about kids in horror movies: they add instant scare-factor. Take a look at most scary film kids, from Village of the Damned to The Others and you’ll see the scariest moments. The fact that the vampire kid collection wasn’t even scary was a pretty big letdown.

18 Teeth Fall From The Sky For No Reason

Season six of AHS, Roanoke, was able to recover some of the lost ground from the previous two less-scary seasons but still suffered from the lack of the one and only Jessica Lang. The season saw a return to the haunted house theme, always popular in AHS history, and wove in some new elements, like the whole “based on a true story” theme.  Between Deliverance-like hillbillies and more incredible Kathy Bates, Roanake was much better-received than Hotel, but it had some weird unexplained moments, like teeth randomly falling from the sky.

Not only do the teeth inexplicably fall while Matt is at work, but they also disappear.

The reason why is never given, prompting us to chalk this one up to “random scare tactic.”

17 Queenie Tried To Hook Up With A Minotaur

While we definitely applaud Murphy and Falchuck’s use of mythology throughout American Horror Story, it often makes no sense. Gabourey Sidibe was fantastic as Queenie, the young and lonely witch who gave as well as she got, used LaLaurie as her own personal racist slave, and really deserved main credits billing. But there was that one time she tried to hook up with a grotesque Minotaur…

While the inclusion of adult content is pretty standard in AHS, getting involved with a man who has bull’s head sewed over his own is pretty far out there. It didn’t make any sense, nor did Queenie’s own survival following the incident (or anything else including the Minotaur, really), so we just move along and say that there’s nothing to see here.

16 Zoe’s Hell Is Just Life Without Kyle

Zoe Benson, portrayed by Taissa Farmiga, starts out as a compelling character in the third season of American Horror Story, Coven. She has unique powers that pay homage to classic horror and a long journey ahead.

Tossing in a love interest is a great way to derail a personal growth story.

That’s what happened to Zoe with Kyle, her resurrected boyfriend played by Evan Peters. While we’re glad that Murphy and Falchuck used Kyle to illustrate that mothers can be abusive to their sons just as much as fathers can, “life without Kyle” as Zoe’s own personal hell is really stupid and overly angst-ridden.

15 Aliens In Asylum Makes No Sense

When it comes to American Horror Story, many fans reacted to the inclusion of aliens in season two, Asylum, in the same way that fans of Indiana Jones reacted to the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. For many horror fans, aliens don’t enter the territory without very specific rules, and you certainly don’t add aliens into an already-existing story for a scare factor.

The aliens of AHS also just weren’t scary. Sure, they made Pepper more interesting and gave convenient explanations for a few weird happenings, but at the end of the day mixing aliens in with mutants, a mean nun, demons, and war criminals just doesn’t work. It’s a hodgepodge of plot devices tossed together like a salad with too many kinds of dressing. Sometimes simpler is just better.

14 The Musical Sequences

We get that Sister Jude is losing her mind in this tenth episode of season two, Asylum, but must we lose ours as well? The episode itself was gripping, but watching Jessica Lange sashay through “The Name Game” wasn’t nearly as eerie as it should have been. It played off as more of an homage to the creators’ Glee in a way that didn’t work.

While some critics enjoyed the mind-boggling number, many of us like to pretend it never happened.

It’s not the last time the showrunners implemented a bit of music and dance, either. Season four, Freak Show, featured several ditties, including a rendition of “Come As You Are” by Evan Peters, Sarah Paulson’s “Dream a Little Dream of Me”, and Lange singing David Bowie’s “Life on Mars”.

13 What Happens To Dr. Arden’s Experiments?

The mutants created in Dr. Arden’s horrific experiments are the stuff of nightmares, and they definitely present an interesting side story among the rest of the godawful happenings at Briarwood Manor in season two of American Horror Story, Asylum. Their issue, of course, is that they disappear off the radar without much of a peep.

Once turned into a mutant and taken to a hospital, Shelley, played by Chloë Sevigny as a homage to the many women unjustly committed to asylums throughout history, seems as if she may be able to lead the authorities toward Arden, but alas, Joseph Fiennes’ conflicted yet greedy Monsignor Timothy Howard takes her out instead. We don’t hear much about them afterward. What happened to the mutants?

12 The Messed-Up Historical Figures

Anne Frank was lobotomized by the evil Dr. Arden from Briarcliff Manor in season two, Asylum. Not only does this make zero sense, but it also really does a disservice to Anne Frank’s memory. There is a lot of artistic license taken with historical figures throughout American Horror Story, from Delphine Lalaurie to James March. Even characters used as backgrounds for new characters, like Nellie Bly’s inspiration for Lana Winters, often seems a bit much, especially when the representation is so loose.

The misrepresentation or grand re-representation of historical figures is nothing new.

Our own history books present complete falsehoods about everyone from Christopher Columbus to Paul Revere. Perhaps it’s just so glaring because we acknowledge that now, particularly during an age of “fake news” awareness.

11 The Opening Sequence And Spoilers Promise More Than We Get

One of the most exciting elements of a new season of American Horror Story is always the opening sequence and the slowly-revealed spoilers. Cast announcements and cool visuals trickle in until we finally get to see that first episode with its incredible casting graphics. The creepy opening sequence does much more than announce the cast: it revs us up like the announcer for a really scary joust about to take place.

The only problem is that it often goes downhill from there. While season 1 typically delivered, the casting graphics in seasons like Freak Show were actually scarier than the episodes themselves. That’s a real problem if we are supposed to be watching a horror program.

10 We Have No Idea What Happened To The Pig Boys

They were a successful execution of “the scary children” in a way that the little vampire entourage of the previous season just couldn’t seem to manage, so maybe that’s why Murphy and Falchuck decided to never let the “pig boys” of season six be seen again.

Aside from the fact that the boys could have made for some truly scary storytelling, the problem here isn’t just that they had no deeper involvement in the story than “check out these creepy kids” but that they don’t even have a resolution. Why the kids say, “Croatoan!” and why they drink pig milk remains unknown, and we may never know what happened to the charming little tykes.

9 No Consequences for the bad things the “good guys” do

As fans of American Horror Story, we sure do forgive a lot of murderers, don’t we? When someone bad finally goes good, all of their wicked deeds don’t seem to be as problematic. Even sweet Nan takes out Joan. Misty Day, otherwise a kind hippie, offs a couple of guys with alligators.

Were these warranted attacks? Maybe, but that doesn’t erase the fact that many characters end the lives of others and we pretty much turn a blind eye toward it like we wouldn’t if they occurred in real life. Of course, from people returning from the grave to mutant attacks near an asylum, there’s really not a lot in the show that applies to real life.

8 There’s Really No War Between The Coven And The Voodoo Witches

During season three, Coven, there’s a big build up about an oncoming war between the coven and the voodoo witches of the area. Both are led by powerful women, and who wasn’t excited to see Fiona, played by Jessica Lange, and Marie Laveau, played by Angela Bassett, go up against one another?

While there was plenty of tension and a zombie attack, it pretty much stopped there, especially after the witch hunters came to town.

AHS often builds up to something we’re expecting and completely abandon it for another plot instead. While we get that they want to keep us on our toes, broken promises do leave us unsatisfied and underwhelmed.

7 Zoe And Madison Gave Their Souls To Azaezel And It Never Came Up Again

When the bus full of frat boys who assaulted Madison wrecks, taking out all of the monsters on board on Madison’s whim, it’s satisfying. Even seeing Kyle taken out doesn’t bother some of us, given that we’ve already seen Evan Peters return from the grave before and wouldn’t be surprised if he returned. He may have stopped his “brothers” but he certainly tried to help them not get caught, making him complicit in the attack.

When Zoe and Madison decide to put “boy parts” together to resurrect Kyle as the perfect Frankenstein boyfriend, they sell their souls to Azaezel in order to do so, and yet it never comes up again. Given that both girls bite the dust during the show, shouldn’t that at least be an issue?

6 Roanoke’s Reality Show Inception

It was one of the most pointless plot points to ever be inserted into a season of American Horror Story. During season six, Roanoke, we’re treated to a reality show type of setting where re-enactors help us understand what happened to the Millers in “My Roanoke Nightmare”, an obvious play on so many other popular reality-based ghost hunting and experience shows. That’s an intriguing concept that works well for much of the season, but then we’re hit with reality-ception.

Getting all of the actors and people involved in actual events together for the blood moon event is one thing, but what about the disclaimer that nobody even survived the ordeal? If that’s true (which makes sense, since this is Roanoke), how did we get the footage in the first place?

5 There’s No Point To Scathach

Scathach, the mythical warrior from the Isle of Skye in Irish folklore, is an incredible character. It’s too bad we didn’t really get to know her in season six, Roanoke.

Lady Gaga’s Scathnach has a plethora of powers, is said to be the first Supreme and yet has no real point in the series.

The witch does a few nefarious things here and there, from purchasing souls to rendering people evil and insane, but in the grand scheme of things she has no real point except to serve as one of those random elements of horror woven in to just be spooky. Given the history of the traditional character, it would be amazing to see Murphy and Falchuck to use this as a tie-in for a more myth-heavy season.

4 People Are Constantly Offed Only To Be Brought Back

Character losses in the American Horror Story realm are pretty much like those in any comic book series: you don’t ever count them as permanent. Even when an entire series ends and you believe a character to be truly gone, they may return in another season! It’s definitely not a new tactic to have characters return from the grave; it’s a strategy used in everything from Dallas to Supernatural.

It makes us feel a little more jaded and a little less invested when tragedy does strike.

Oh, Fiona is sick? Oh, Ethel’s not going to make it? It’s too often meaningless. We want to feel affected, and we can’t help but worry a bit because we do love these characters, but deep down we’re always still wondering when they’ll return.

3 Twisty’s “Resolution” Is Basically A Deus Ex Machina

Season four’s big villain, Twisty the Clown, turned out to be much more Bozo than Pennywise. Sure, he was scary-looking, and he had the tragic backstory to boot, but Twisty’s crimes felt more garden variety scary movie than the monstrous panache we’d expect from AHS.

Twisty, played by John Carroll Lynch, even had a disappointing resolution as a character. Not only was he never really sorted out by a main character or a victim bent on revenge, but he was literally yanked out of the show to join Edward Mordrake’s nightmarish troupe, collecting the clown’s soul after hearing his tale of woe.

2 Misty Day Was Unjustly Lost

One of the characters fans most resonated with in season three, Coven, was Misty Day, played by the talented Lily Rabe. Misty’s character screamed Supreme, from her unique abilities to her lack of really caring about the position.

Misty was all about fairness, being kind to animals, and protecting the vulnerable, making her a fantastic character to root for.

Unfortunately she was also a red herring. Falchuck and Murphy offed her in such a terrible way in a Hell made up of her own personal vivisection nightmare, which made zero sense given her ability to bring things back to life so easily. Misty didn’t deserve her ending, but neither did Nan and many other characters.

1 Tate Is A School Shooter

Tate Langdon is one of the most romanticized characters in the history of AHS. The season 1 character is a doting friend, devoted boyfriend who would do anything for Violet, and speaks volumes of teen angst to many a smitten heart. It doesn’t hurt that Evan Peters, who plays Tate, is easy on the eyes as well. Is that why it’s so hard to remember that Langdon is such a deplorable character?

Tate is a school shooter. He took the lives of several classmates and should represent what we most despise and do not condone in this nation right now. He also assaulted Violet’s mother, Vivian, causing her to become pregnant with his Antichrist baby. How can anyone still crush on this guy knowing what harm he’s done?

What other problems with American Horror Story do fans overlook? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-10 08:10:37 – Sara Schmidt

15 Sitcoms That Became Massive Hits (And 15 That Completely Flopped)

There are many forms of entertainment, but television is one of the most popular. Watching TV has been a popular pastime ever since the television was created in 1927. Programs can often bring families together or can even give people an escape from reality while they binge-watch their new favorite show. People used to have to pay for cable to watch their favorite shows, but now, watching TV is easier than ever with the mass amount of streaming services that have become available, such as Hulu and Netflix.

Some of the best shows are even exclusive to streaming services such as these. Even YouTube has expanded to include TV shows that come in a variety of genres. Needless to say, there is now a seemingly endless amount of programming that will entertain anybody and everybody.

Much like movies, there are a wide variety of TV shows and genres to pick from. TV networks seem to come out with a variety of different shows each year including sitcoms. While a network might release a few different sitcoms each year, a lot of them seem to flop and be forever forgotten by viewers. Other sitcoms stick around for several years resulting in many seasons worth of laughs.

Some of these shows have stuck around longer than they probably should have, but others were so terrible that they were canceled after only one season.

 Here are the 15 Sitcoms That Became Massive Hits (And 15 That Completely Flopped). 

30 Massive Hit: The Big Bang Theory

The Big Bang Theory may have not launched any of the main actors acting careers, but the show certainly boosted them into the spotlight. The Big Bang Theory came on the air in 2007 thanks to creators Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady. The show centers around a group of geeky and socially awkward friends who hang out with a waitress named Penny.

The show has become incredibly popular during its twelve seasons on the air, with many celebrities making cameos on the show.

The Big Bang Theory became so popular that it even received a spinoff about a young Sheldon Cooper.

29 Flopped: Caveman

The Cavemen were a popular marketing image used by the auto insurance company GEICO starting in 2004. While people don’t see a lot of the Cavemen anymore, they used to be incredibly popular. ABC thought they were so popular that they should launch a sitcom featuring the GEICO Cavemen.

The show was a massive failure with viewers and critics and was therefore canceled after one season. Thirteen episodes were created for the first season; however, only six of them aired in the U.S. Caveman was such a flop that it didn’t even get a DVD release to try and make some money back. 

28 Massive Hit: Friends

Friends was a massive win for NBC and ran for ten years from 1994 to 2004. The show just follows the lives of six friends living in Manhattan, but many people loved the idea of the show.

Friends was, and still is, adored by fans and critics. The show even landed the #24 spot on the Writers Guild of America West’s 101 Best Written TV Series. The sitcom did a lot for all of the actors involved in the series, but is often considered a turning point for Jennifer Aniston’s career. 

27 Flopped: Ferris Bueller

John Hughes’ Ferris Bueller’s Day Off starring Matthew Broderick was a hit back in 1986. Fans still love the movie to this day and even launched a “Ferris Fest” in Chicago to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the movie. While the film was successful, the TV series was not.

The show titled Ferris Bueller followed Ferris and his friends’ everyday life at high school. What made the first movie fun was that Ferris wasn’t in school, but NBC apparently didn’t get that since they picked up the series in the ‘90s. The show didn’t bring back any of the original cast members and ended after one season. 

26 Massive Hit: That ‘70s Show

When That ‘70s Show first came on the air, there was no guarantee that the show would succeed. The show starred primarily new young actors, with little to no acting experience. That ‘70s Show was even the very first acting job for Ashton Kutcher, Topher Grace, and Laura Prepon. Thankfully, the risk paid off for Fox and became a massive hit.

The series lasted for eight seasons from 1998 to 2006. Besides, Kutcher, Grace, and Prepon, the show also starred Mila Kunis, Danny Masterson, and Wilmer Valderrama. The cast did a phenomenal job for a total of 200 episodes, and then went on to have even more enriching careers in Hollywood. 

25 Flopped: That ‘80s Show

While That ‘70s Show was a massive hit, the success could not be repeated for That ‘80s Show. Even when Fox was still broadcasting new episodes of That ‘70s Show, they created a show about the ‘80s in 2002.

The show isn’t a direct sequel to the first show and the only way it connects to That ‘70s Show is that the main character, Corey Howard, is supposed to be Eric Forman’s cousin.

The show was created because of the popularity of That ‘70s Show, but people just weren’t interested in another show about a different decade. 

24 Massive Hit: The Office

The original The Office debuted on the BBC in 2001 and only stuck around for two seasons and a Christmas special. The concept for the show, however, was adapted eight different times for countries across the world.

One of the more popular versions of The Office came in 2005. The show starred Steve Carell as Michael Scott and John Krasinski as Jim Halpert. These two men have probably had the biggest career after the show ended, but the entire cast made a memorable group of characters that kept fans laughing for nine seasons. 

23 Flopped: George

George Foreman may be known for his impressive boxing career or even the famous George Foreman Grill, but he also got his own TV show in the ‘90s. The show ran for ten episodes, only nine of which actually ended up on the air. The show starred Foreman as a retired boxer who took care of troubled kids after school.

While Foreman’s show may have flopped, there is no doubt denying he was an impressive boxer especially since he won a gold medal in the 1968 Mexico City Summer Olympics. 

22 Massive Hit: How I Met Your Mother

How I Met Your Mother was a romantic comedy that aired on CBS from 2005 to 2014. The show centered around Ted Mosby, who would narrate the adventures that led up to him meeting his wife.

Apart from Ted, played by Josh Radnor, the series had several other memorable characters played by Jason Segel, Cobie Smulders, Neil Patrick Harris, and Alyson Hannigan. While the majority of the series was met with critical acclaim, the final two seasons are often criticized for the way it wrapped up the show. A spinoff titled How I Met Your Dad or How I Met Your Father have been in development before, but the spinoff has had some trouble taking off. 

21 Flopped: 1600 Penn

NBC has had some hits over the years, but 1600 Penn was not one of them. The series was about a dysfunctional family who lived in the White House with their father.

Bill Pullman played the President of the United States starring alongside with Josh Gad, Jenna Elfman, and Martha MacIsaac. The show ultimately didn’t do well with critics who slammed the show for having too many sitcom stereotypes and being a failed parody attempt of The West Wing. The show was canceled after one season and people aren’t really begging NBC to bring it back. 

20 Massive Hit: Brooklyn Nine-Nine

There has always been an abundance of cop dramas on TV, but not as many cop sitcoms. Brooklyn Nine-Nine stars the singer of the comedy band The Lonely Island Andy Samberg, as well as Terry Crews, Melissa Fumero, Joe Lo Truglio, and Stephanie Beatriz.

In May, Fox decided to cancel the show, but the very next day, NBC picked it up and renewed it for a sixth season.

So far, Brooklyn Nine-Nine has won two Golden Globes, two Primetime Emmy Awards, and has been nominated for several other awards.

19 Flopped: Dads

The show Dads was created by Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild and premiered on Fox in 2013. Seth Green and Giovanni Ribisi starred as two video game developers whose fathers move in with them. Not only was the show canceled after only one season, but it also got ripped apart by critics.

The series became known for depending on offensive gags to get laughs and having an array of unlikable characters. Along with Green and Ribisi, Brenda Song and Vanessa Lachey had recurring roles on the show.

18 Massive Hit: Modern Family

Modern Family is about three different families living in Los Angeles. Much like The Office, Modern Family was created as a mockumentary type sitcom. The series was created in 2009 and is still running on ABC. The show has won an impressive 21 Primetime Emmy Awards, which is partly because of the incredible cast.

Actors such as Ed O’Neil, Sofía Vergara, Ty Burrell, and Eric Stonestreet are some of the many talented people in the cast. While the series has been a massive hit so far, there are rumors that the show could be ending after season 10. 

17 Flopped: My Big Fat Greek Life

It isn’t every day that a romantic comedy will spawn its own TV show, but it certainly happens. My Big Fat Greek Wedding came out in 2002 and starred Nia Vardalos and John Corbett.

The movie revolved around the struggles that Vardalos’ character Toula had by marrying someone who wasn’t Greek. The TV series took place after the first film and starred Vardalos, but Corbett did not return. At first, the series had incredible ratings, but by the second episode, people had started to tune out, which led to CBS canceling the show. 

16 Massive Hit: It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia 

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia was created by Rob McElhenney in 2005 and is currently still running on FXX. The comedy is about five friends who run an Irish Bar in Philadelphia. McElhenney stars in the show alongside fellow comedians Charlie Day, Danny Devito, Kaitlin Olson, and Glenn Howerton. The show began with low ratings, which is why FX forced the show to add a big name actor.

Devito was added to the cast and they haven’t looked back since. It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia has received critical acclaim since the beginning, and now thirteen seasons later, it has become one of the longest-running live action comedies ever. 

15 Flopped: Joey

Many fans were disappointed to see Friends go off the air in 2004. While most of the cast moved on to other acting roles, one friend stuck around to try and get more laughs for NBC.

After Friends ended, Matt LeBlanc played Joey Tribbiani in the spinoff show titled Joey.

The show saw Joey move on with his life and try to make it big in Hollywood as an actor. The show couldn’t live up to the success that NBC saw with the first series and it was ultimately canceled after two seasons. 

14 Massive Hit: Arrested Development 

Arrested Development has been bringing on the laughs ever since the first episode aired in 2003. The show originally ran for three seasons on Fox but was then later picked up by Netflix. Netflix released season four in 2013 and the first half of season five this year.

The show truly has an ensemble cast, including actors Jason Bateman, Michael Cera, Portia de Rossi, and Will Arnett. Tony Hale and David Cross also have the fan-favorite roles of Buster Bluth and Tobias Fünke. The entire series can be found on Netflix. 

13 Flopped: Bad Judge

While shows like Judge Judy or The People’s Court may be hilarious already, NBC set out to make an actual sitcom about a judge in 2014.

Kate Walsh stars as Judge Rebecca Wright, who works at the Los Angeles County Circuit Court by day, but is a party animal by night. NBC canceled the show before the season had even gotten halfway through, although the rest of the series came on the air as planned. Most people gave the show negative reviews, mainly criticizing Walsh’s performance and the fact that the show just wasn’t funny. 

12 Massive Hit: Parks and Recreation

Parks and Recreation, or simply Parks and Rec., was a massive hit for a couple different reasons. Not only was the show a sitcom, but it doubled as political satire and a mockumentary.

The show ran for a total of seven seasons, but for many people, that wasn’t enough. Parks and Rec. had an incredible cast and memorable characters that only got more hilarious as the series continued. This show most notably included Chris Pratt who has recently blown up in Hollywood, starring in many massive summer blockbusters. 

11 Flopped: Mulaney

John Mulaney is no doubt a funny guy. He is a stand-up comedian and even wrote on Saturday Night Live; however, the sitcom he created in 2014 couldn’t grab people’s attention. The show starred Mulaney himself as a comedian in New York. However, people were concerned about the show before it even came on the air.

The show had an obvious resemblance to Seinfeld and concerns were solidified when the show premiered. With Mulaney doing poorly with critics and with not a lot of people tuning in, the show was canceled after only one season.

10 Massive Hit: Community

Community’s premise centers on Jeff Winger, who is a lawyer who lied about having a bachelor’s degree and is forced to attend a community college. Community lasted for six seasons, five of which aired on NBC and the last on Yahoo! Screen.

The show became a massive hit not just because of the impressive writing team, but because of its cast.

Veteran comedian Chevy Chase stars in the show alongside actors like Joel McHale, Danny Pudi, Alison Brie, and Donald Glover. The show also succeeded by parodying several television and movie clichés. 

9 Flopped: Rob

Some actors have a certain time in the spotlight before they fall out of it completely. Fans have seen this happen with Adam Sandler, despite his attempt to stay relevant, and also with his friend and co-worker Rob Schneider.

Schneider attempted to make a sitcom back in 2012 simply titled Rob and CBS actually picked it up. The show focused on Rob, a former bachelor who works as a landscape architect with OCD and who recently got married. Rob was canceled after eight episodes once the show was flooded with horrible reviews pointing out the show’s use of Mexican stereotypes and the weak supporting cast. 

8 Massive Hit: The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

Before Will Smith was a massive Hollywood star, he starred in a show on NBC called The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. The show was a huge hit and spawned a total of six seasons and 148 episodes. Will Smith starred as a fictionalized version of himself who goes to live with his Aunt and Uncle in Bel-Air after he gets into one little fight and his mom gets scared. We all know how the rest of the story goes.

Besides Smith, the show is known for the talented cast members, the unique story, and the wide range of celebrity cameos.

7 Flopped: AfterMASH

After the show M*A*S*H ended, CBS came out with AfterMASH. Adequately titled, AfterMASH centered around Colonel Potter, Sergeant Klinger, and Father Mulch who end up in a veteran’s hospital after the Korean War ended.

While M*A*S*H did quite well for the eleven seasons it was on the air, AfterMASH only lasted two seasons before getting canceled. AfterMASH just couldn’t capture what made the first show great, but that didn’t stop CBS from trying again. The TV network would try again in 1984 with WALTER, but thankfully that show didn’t even get picked up. 

6 Massive Hit: The Middle

The Middle was just an average show about a lower middle-class family, yet it still became a massive hit. The series was created by Eileen Heisler and DeAnn Heline, who previously worked on shows like Roseanne and Murphy Brown.

The show was praised for accurately capturing the lives of a middle-class family while still delivering a hilarious story and unique characters. The Middle lasted for nine seasons before going off the air this year. While the show might be over, a spinoff revolving around Eden Sher’s character Sue Heck is currently in the works. 

5 Flopped: Angel From Hell

Those who don’t remember the sitcom Angel From Hell will be forgiven since the show wasn’t really anything to write home about. In the show Angel From Hell, Jane Lynch stars as a guardian angel for a girl named Allison, who was played by Maggie Lawson.

The show came after Lynch starred in the massively popular Glee, yet Angel From Hell didn’t get as big of a fan base.

The show was canceled by CBS after only five episodes at the beginning of 2016. While CBS didn’t initially air the remaining eight episodes, the rest of the season was released starting in July 2016. 

4 Massive Hit: Two and a Half Men

Even though Two and a Half Men often got mixed reviews, it was still a massive hit for CBS. The show ran for twelve seasons before going off the air, but the show started with Jon Cryer, Charlie Sheen, and a young Angus T. Jones.

There was a lot of drama surrounding the show, especially after Sheen’s crazed antics, but the show continued never the less. After a feud with show co-creator Chuck Lorre, Sheen was replaced on the show with Ashton Kutcher. Kutcher stayed on for the rest of the series until the show ended in 2015. 

3 Flopped: I Hate My Teenage Daughter

Another one of Fox’s TV shows that flopped was called I Hate My Teenage Daughter. The show was about a pair of moms, played by Jaime Pressly and Katie Finneran, who began to notice that their daughters were turning into the kind of teenagers who had bullied them in high school.

The show began its thirteen episode run in November 2011 and ended it in May 2012. After Fox decided to cancel the show, the remaining six episodes were never released in the U.S., but based on viewership, nobody was really watching anyway.

2 Massive Hit: Seinfeld

Created by Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld, the show Seinfeld began in 1989 and lasted for nine seasons. The show was about a fictionalized version of Jerry Seinfeld who lived in New York and spent time with his friends. The show is often called one of the greatest sitcoms ever made and even landed the #2 spot on the Writers Guild of America West’s 101 Best Written TV Series.

Many shows have since tried to copy Seinfeld’s success, but none have been as original as this NBC hit. 

1 Flopped: My Mother the Car

As strange as it sounds, My Mother the Car was an actual sitcom back in the ‘60s. The show follows David Crabtree, who purchases a car that happens to be a reincarnation of his mother who passed away.

The show aired on NBC and starred Dick Van Dyke’s little brother Jerry, but even the Van Dyke gene couldn’t save the show. My Mother the Car was as strange as it was horrible, and not very many people cared for the show. NBC decided to cancel the program after just one season. 

Are there any other sitcoms that should have made the list? Sound off in the comments!



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2018-10-07 04:10:06 – Christopher Fiduccia

Hillary Clinton’s Madam Secretary Cameo, New Details Revealed

Hillary Clinton will be appearing on an upcoming episode of Madam Secretary, and details have been released ahead of the season 5 premiere. The CBS political drama stars Téa Leoni as Elizabeth McCord, a former CIA analyst who assumes the position of Secretary of State following the mysterious death of her predecessor. The series, which is executive produced by Lori McCreary, has drawn generally positive reviews and has commented on many of the real-life issues facing the U.S. government.

Though Leoni’s Secretary McCord has been compared to Clinton, the 2016 presidential candidate has not appeared on the series before now. Madeleine Albright, who held the position of Secretary of State under Clinton’s husband’s administration, appeared in a season 2 episode of the series. It was first announced in July that Albright, Clinton, and another former Secretary of State, Colin Powell, would make an appearance in this episode. Now, just days before the premiere, some insight into what went on behind-the-scenes has been shared.

Related: ‘Madam Secretary’ Series Premiere Review

TVLine reports that, during a set visit last month, McCreary and stars Keith Carradine and Erich Bergen revealed what it was like to have Clinton and the other former Secretaries of State on set. McCreary recalls that the politicians were giving with their “time and energy,” adding “it was really an honor that they would spend their time with us.” Carradine, who stars on the show as U.S. President Dalton, shared a funny moment with Clinton, in which she referred to him as “Mr. President.” In fact, he says that all of the Secretaries of State referred to him as such, noting their “spirit of play” on set.

But possibly the most intriguing anecdote comes from Bergen, who plays Blake Moran, personal assistant to Secretary McCord. Bergen has a background in musical theater, which also happens to be a passion of Clinton’s. While chatting with the politician on set, Bergen learned that she knew of his role in the show Waitress, and told him she “was a big fan of Smash,” a musical drama that aired on NBC and was canceled after just two seasons.

Though this is Clinton’s first time on this particular show, it’s not her first time playing a version of herself on T. In fact, it’s not even her first time this year. In the first episode of the revival of Murphy Brown, Clinton shared a moment with the eponymous journalist, making a joke about her emails. The episode also featured a fake Twitter conversation with U.S. President Donald Trump. And, in 2016, Clinton made a brief appearance on Broad City, taking a selfie with Abbi and Ilana at her campaign headquarters in New York.

More: Murphy Brown Revival Premiere Includes Hillary Clinton Cameo

Madam Secretary season 5 premieres on Sunday, October 7 on CBS.

Source: TVLine



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2018-10-05 06:10:30 – Becca Bleznak

Murphy Brown Revival Premiere Includes Hillary Clinton Cameo

Murphy Brown has never been able to turn down a good political cameo, and the premiere episode of the revival kicked things off with a big fish: Hillary Clinton. The episode, titled “Fake News,” aired on September 27, and marked the first episode of the series in 20 years – so there was a lot of time to make up for.

The episode kicked off with Murphy, having left FYI years prior, returning to CBS in 2018 to host a news show, Murphy in the Morning. Murphy has her whole gang back together, and she’s angry at the state of the world, determined to bring back good journalism. Concurrently, her son, Avery, is working at a conservative media outlet, Wolf Network, offering his more liberal perspective.

Related: Murphy Brown Revival Confirms More Returning Cast Members

An old gag during the show’s original run was that Murphy had to deal with a revolving door of annoying secretaries. This time, Hilary Clinton (one “l”) is up for the job, played by Clinton herself. As THR reports, the scene, in which Clinton makes a crack about having “some experience with emails,” wasn’t included in the press screeners seen by critics prior to the premiere, making it a major reveal for all.

Clinton isn’t the only 2016 presidential candidate to receive a callout in the episode. Given the title and star Candice Bergen’s own admission to going on a date with him once, it’s not surprising that Donald Trump was mentioned. Murphy was given the same story as her portrayer and used it for her very first tweet, which started a patented Trump Twitter rant. Considering the show is known for making things meta and tackling the most important issues of the moment, it’s only fitting that the first episode would include both Clinton and Trump. And it probably won’t be the last mention of either of them – especially as far as Trump is concerned.

This isn’t the first time Clinton has appeared as herself (or a version of herself) on a scripted series. In a 2016 episode of Broad City, Ilana inadvertently ends up volunteering to make calls on behalf of Clinton’s presidential campaign, and she and Abbi manage to get a moment (and a selfie) with the woman herself. Clinton also will appear on the season 5 premiere of Madam Secretary, alongside other former secretaries of state Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell.

More: Murphy Brown Premiere Review: This Revival Isn’t Afraid To Show Its Politics

Source: THR



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2018-09-27 08:09:52 – Becca Bleznak

Murphy Brown Premiere Review: This Revival Isn’t Afraid To Show Its Politics

As the recent wave of reboots and revivals go, the return of Murphy Brown to television feels propelled by a more distinct purpose than some of its fellow back-from-the-dead series, like Roseanne (now The Conners), Magnum P.I., or even NBC’s revived Will & Grace. It is the unlikely revival that nevertheless seems born of a particular moment — a political one — that, in its bumpy premiere, the show, which brings back Candice Bergen, along with almost all of the show’s original cast, proudly and loudly wears on its sleeve. This should come as absolutely no surprise to anyone. After all, this was the series that, at the height of its creative power and popularity, got into a verbal and very public sparring match with then-Vice President Dan Quayle. 

To say that things haven’t changed much would be an understatement. The new series takes full advantage of the current political climate and state of cable news in this day and age of screaming television pundits, conspiracy theorists, social media outrage, and Twitter feuds — especially with a certain tweeter in the Oval Office — to comment on and lambast the country’s political divide, as well as the current administration. On one hand, seeing series creator Diane English and the rest of the series’ cast and crew take such a direct and partisan approach to the revival is impressive and admirable, not the least because doing so threatens to cut into the show’s ratings, but also because the approach feels unlikely given the network the series has returned to. While that means Murphy Brown likely won’t return to ratings like those enjoyed by ABC when Roseanne Barr made her brief return to television, at least this series isn’t confused about how its politics will mesh with those of its star.

More: A Million Little Things Review: ABC Takes On This Is Us With Weepy Relationship Drama

But while taking the direct approach makes the revival stand out even more than it already would have (people love a revival), that same approach takes a toll on the premiere and second episode, making Murphy’s return to TV — both on the show and in our reality — feel clumsy in a way that undercuts its early efforts. The premiere, in particular, falls victim to the show’s early ungainliness, in part because all the jokes aimed at Trump, the ramifications of the 2016 election, and the state of the news industry — the premiere is titled ‘Fake News’ after all — wind up being awkwardly wedged in with all the heavy lifting required to re-introduce the characters, their circumstances over the last 20 years, and why they’re getting the old gang back together for a cable news morning show called Murphy In the Morning. 

The difficulty of those efforts are ostensibly doubled by the need to explain the addition of Tyne Daily as Phyllis, the sister of Phil, the late owner of Phil’s, the D.C. bar where the journalists like to hang out, and to set up the relationship between Murphy and her now-grown son Avery (Jake McDorman of the short-lived Limitless series on CBS). As it turns out, Avery has followed in his mother’s journalistic footsteps and has accepted a position at the Wolf Network — this show’s version of FOX News — as the sole liberal voice. As it turns out, Avery’s new show will compete directly with that of his mother’s. 

This sets up an interesting dynamic to their relationship. It immediately brings Avery into the fold without doing what would be expected: having them be on the same show together, or at least working at the same network. That helps the show avoid engaging in the sort of embarrassing generational humor Avery seems built to be representative of. But rather than simply avoid the Millennial vs. Baby Boomer conflict altogether, Murphy Brown introduces a third new character, Pat (Nik Dodani), as the show’s head of social media. Pat’s introduced with a pair of Air Pods sticking out of his ears, which accentuates a painful joke about Murphy’s antiquated cell phone and her lack of a social media presence. 

It’s plain to see where the show is going with its emphasis on the influence of social media and the purported influence of morning cable news programs over the president, whose Twitter feed makes an appearance late in episode as a way for Murphy to confront Trump. The move certainly announces the show’s arrival in no uncertain terms, but it also does so at the expense of its characters. As mentioned above, ‘Fake News’ is so absorbed with reestablishing everyone’s role — Frank Fontana (Joe Regalbuto) is teaching investigative journalism rather than practicing it; Corky Sherwood (Faith Ford) is recovering from losing her job as host of another morning show; and producer Miles Silverberg (Grant Shaud) has moved into the Watergate Hotel following a nervous breakdown after a stint producing The View — if never quite finds time to let it characters interact in a way that feels genuine. 

Thankfully, by the time the series hits its third episode, Murphy Brown refrains from shoehorning political jokes into otherwise banal conversations, and instead allows the humor to develop from an actual political situation. The jokes feel more points and appropriate to the circumstances as a result. 

Though it’s a bumpy ride for the first few episodes, Murphy Brown delivers an energetic return that feels galvanized by the world it’s compelled to comment on. Similarly, Bergen and the rest of the cast are in top form, and once the revival gets past its first awkward steps, the audience will begin to see what made the show a hit in the first place, and why, after all these years, it came back. 

Next: Single Parents Review: ABC Tries Its Hand At New Girl-Style Comedy

Murphy Brown continues next Thursday with ‘I (Don’t) Heart Huckabee’ @9:30pm on CBS.



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2018-09-27 07:09:47 – Kevin Yeoman

Eddie Murphy Starring in Ride Along Director’s Grumpy Old Men Remake

Eddie Murphy is set to star in New Line’s Grumpy Old Men remake, to be directed by Ride Along helmer Tim Story. The original Grumpy Old Men starred legendary acting duo Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in a tale of two elderly neighbors locked in an ages-old feud. Their bad blood reaches a boiling point when a new neighbor (Ann-Margret) moves in next door and stokes both men’s romantic fires.

Released in 1993, Grumpy Old Men would go on to gross $70 million at the box office ($155 million when adjusted for inflation). A 1995 sequel Grumpier Old Men, which added Sophia Loren to the cast, grossed $71 million ($150 million when adjusted for inflation). The chemistry between Lemmon and Matthau would prove to be the magic ingredient that helped both Grumpy Old Men and its sequel transcend their formulaic material and become enduring comedy hits.

Related: 10 Dirtiest Movie Grandpas of All Time

Now, New Line will revisit Grumpy Old Men with Eddie Murphy attached in one of the lead roles (via Deadline). Tim Story will handle producing and directing duties on the film, with John Davis also onboard as a producer. The film does not as yet have a title, nor does it have a second actor to work alongside Murphy. Deadline says Samuel L. Jackson has been proposed as Murphy’s co-star, and indeed Jackson recently worked with Tim Story on the latest remake of Shaft.

Murphy was of course once considered a comedic movie talent big enough to rival legends the stature of Lemmon or Matthau. After launching a successful stand-up career, Murphy’s star rose on Saturday Night Live, then he became a movie star through a string of hits including 48 Hrs., Trading Places, Beverly Hills Cop and Coming to America. After a run of box office failures, the previously R-rated Murphy settled in to a second career as more of a family-friendly comedian in movies like The Nutty Professor, Doctor Dolittle and Shrek. Murphy can next be seen playing ‘70s cult icon Rudy Ray Moore in the biopic Dolemite is My Name. There are also persistent stories that Beverly Hills Cop 4 could still happen.

Murphy has occasionally looked poised to mount a legitimate A-list comeback, but thus far the return of golden era Murphy longed for by many fans has yet to materialize. It remains to be seen if New Line’s new take on Grumpy Old Men will be the vehicle that returns Murphy to his old form. Much will depend on the script of course, and who is chosen to star alongside Murphy. Jackson would no doubt be an intriguing choice, especially if the film aims for more of an edgy, adult tone. The original Grumpy Old Men was farcical and grouchy, but stayed on the PG-13 side of the line.

More: 15 Things You Never Knew About Coming To America

Source: Deadline



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2018-09-18 03:09:24 – Dan Zinski