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Does Bad Times At The El Royale Have A Post-Credits Scene?

Drew Goddard’s Bad Times at the El Royale sees the writer-director try his hand at a ’60s-set noir thriller, but does it have a post-credits scene setting up a sequel or clearing up the ending? Goddard made a name for himself in Hollywood as a writer, working on TV shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Alias. He made his directorial debut on 2012’s The Cabin in the Woods, a film he co-wrote with Joss Whedon. The movie became a hit with critics and well-remembered by horror fans for its handling of tropes typical to the genre. Now, Goddard returns to film directing with this year’s Bad Times at the El Royale.

The movie follows seven strangers over the course of one night in the ’60s at a motel called the El Royale, which sits on the border between California and Nevada. The star-studded cast includes Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Jon Hamm, Dakota Johnson, Chris Hemsworth, Cailee Spaeny and Lewis Pullman as guests of the motel and the concierge working at the establishment. As the movie progresses, viewers follow the various characters throughout the night and gain insight into the backstories before arriving at the El Royale.

Related: Screen Rant’s Review of Bad Times at the El Royale

Now that the movie is in theaters, fans of Goddard – and/or those intrigued by the Bad Times at the El Royale trailers – have a chance to check it out, but they may be wondering if there’s an extra scene after the credits. Unfortunately, Bad Times at the El Royale does not have a post-credits scene, which means the movie wraps up entirely before the credits start to roll. While it’s always worth it to watch the credits of a film and get an idea of who was involved in making it, Bad Times at the El Royale doesn’t feature any extra teaser or scene at the very end.

Those who have seen Bad Times at the El Royale know the movie doesn’t quite leave room for a sequel, though there are undoubtedly ways one could be done. Still, it makes sense that the film doesn’t feature a post-credits scene setting up a follow-up. It’s relatively clear that there won’t be a sequel to the movie – just like there won’t be a sequel to Cabin in the Woods – but not all post-credits scenes are explicitly sequel teasers. Some are simply an additional scene that offer added context or insight into the main movie.

For instance, a Bad Times at the El Royale post-credits scene could have cleared up the mystery of who was on the film reel that’s discussed throughout the movie. Instead, viewers are left to ponder who might be the man on that reel (which was, no doubt, Goddard’s intention). So, while there may have been a way for Bad Times at the El Royale to incorporate a post-credits scene, it also doesn’t necessarily need one. At the end of the day, whether or not a movie includes a post-credits scene is up to the director and Goddard chose not to include one for Bad Times at the El Royale.

Next: Bad Times At The El Royale’s Ending & Big Mysteries Explained



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2018-10-11 04:10:56 – Molly Freeman

18 Best Sequels, According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%)

We live in an age where sequels are all the rage. Every major studio is chasing those franchises that can keep their cash flow healthy for years to come. Sometimes, they’re exhausting. Other times, they can be our most anticipated movies. Maybe we could do without more Transformers movies, but Marvel and Mission: Impossible sequels are event movies that drive us to the theater in droves.

Sequels are tricky and unpredictable, though. On one hand, they’re often necessary for expanding stories and the good ones continue sagas we want to see progress. On the other, some are soulless cash grabs that shouldn’t exist. In the worst cases, some of them completely derail promising franchises by failing to deliver the goods. Then again, in some instances, sequels can get a series back up and running after they’ve experienced setbacks.

This list will look at those rare sequels that are considered worthy — and even superior — follow-ups. Those rare beasts that make us grateful for multiple movies in a series. Furthermore, we’ll also be discussing the most maligned sequels that brought no critical good will to their respective franchises whatsoever. It’s more fun this way. In order to fully appreciate the best of the best, we also must acknowledge the worst of the worst. Without evil, we wouldn’t be able to understand all that’s good and pure. Without terrible movies, we wouldn’t be grateful for the good ones.

With this in mind, here are 18 Best Sequels According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%).

26 Best: Captain America: Civil War (91%)

The decision to keep the same team of writers for all three Captain America films paid off in the end. The trilogy just went from strength to strength with each passing entry, though some would argue that The Winter Soldier is equally as good — if not better — than Civil War. Either way, they’re both prime examples of how to do sequels right.

Civil War tackles the same themes you’d expect from a movie about a do-gooder like Cap, but where the film truly soars is during its wild third act. The airport showdown is the best action showdown in the MCU, and that’s saying something.

25 Worst: The Bad News Bears Go To Japan (0%)

If you didn’t know that sequels to The Bad News Bears exist then no one would think any less of you. While the first movie is a cult classic about an underdog baseball team, the sequels have faded from the collective memory with the passing of time, lost like tears in the rain. That’s for good reason.

None of the sequels are good, but The Bad News Bears Go To Japan is especially bad.

While the idea to relocate to Japan for a big game is good on paper, the sequel is just bland, forgettable, and was made to cash in on the brand name.

24 Best: Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens (93%)

Some fans argue that The Force Awakens is essentially a retread of A New Hope in many ways. However, clearly the critics and audiences didn’t necessarily agree, given its stellar Rotten Tomatoes score and its audience score of 87%, not to mention its impressive box office haul.

As far as Star Wars movies go, it hits the spot. The new characters are great, the return of some old faces is a trip down memory lane, and the story still made significant effort to push the franchise forward. In those regards, the film definitely succeeded.

23 Best: War for the Planet of the Apes (93%)

Anyone who has a problem with classics being rebooted needs to watch the most recent Planet of the Apes trilogy.  The finale pits the apes in a brutal battle against the humans, which leads to an epic confrontation between the Caesar the Ape and humanity’s ruthless colonel (played by an utterly wicked Woody Harrelson). As far as concluding trilogies goes, War for the Planet of the Apes has everything.

By no means is this a pleasant movie, but it is rewarding. And not only does it wrap up an epic story, but the film boasts some of the great CGI wizardry out there. The action is also ridiculously impressive and compelling, which is crazy considering it’s a movie about people versus monkeys.

22 Best: Logan (93%)

James Mangold’s Logan, the gloriously violent and heartbreaking farewell to Patrick Stewart’s Professor X and Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine, is an all-timer. Taking cues from the Old Man Logan comics, the movie has just as much in common with neo-westerns as it does with superhero yarns, which makes for a gritty, character-driven elegy to characters many of us grew up with.

Logan deserves praise for going R-rated and taking some stylistic risks.

The movie is proof that audiences will still flock to see superhero movies with some edge. If you’re going to send off some icons, this is the way to do it.

21 Worst: Return to the Blue Lagoon (0%)

Considering that no one liked The Blue Lagoon (it currently holds a 9% rating on RT), why anyone would want to return to the franchise is beyond comprehension. Of course, every sequel is a perfect opportunity to right some old wrongs if handled with care. Unfortunately, this was not. The story follows two children who are marooned on a tropical island as the grow up and fall in love, etc. The characters don’t wear enough clothes either, which makes for some weird, uncomfortable viewing.

There are some unintentional laughs to be had at the poor script and performances.

Otherwise the Blue Lagoon isn’t a scenic cinematic paradise worth spending time in unless you want to punish yourself for some reason.

20 Best: The Dark Knight (94%)

Few superhero movies are ever regarded as anything more than popcorn fare. However, if there were ever a superhero movie that proved the genre could be prestige cinema, it would be The Dark Knight. Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman is an exploration of chaos and just how far people are willing to go to achieve their goal.

The Dark Knight — for better or worse when you consider how devoid of fun some DC movies have been since — also brought a gritty, realistic touch to the genre. The movie feels more like a Michael Mann crime saga than it does a story about superheroes versus their outlandishly evil counterparts.

19 Best: Finding Dory (94%)

In recent times, Pixar has been criticized for relying too heavily on sequels, but if it ain’t broke… Finding Dory was released 13 years after Finding Nemo, and it was a smash with critics and audiences alike.

Its 94% on Rotten Tomatoes is complemented by an 84% audience score.

Upon release Finding Dory was praised for being as funny and thought-provoking as the first movie, while also adding a new dimension to the story. As with any Pixar movie, Finding Dory can be appreciated by audiences of all ages. 

18 Worst: Staying Alive (0%)

No other actor on the planet has experienced a career of ups and downs like John Travolta has. When he broke out he had the world at his dancing feet. After that, his career experienced a downturn until it was resurrected briefly following Pulp Fiction until it ultimately plummeted when he started starring in movies like Battlefield Earth. Staying Alive was released in 1983 when Travolta was experiencing his first fall from grace. Following up a classic like Saturday Night Fever was never going to be easy, but it shouldn’t have been this difficult, either.

The sequel lacks the gritty realism of its predecessor, and instead tries to get by on dance sequences. What’s the point in dancing when we don’t care about who’s doing it?

17 Best: Creed (95%)

No franchise tends to remain compelling seven sequels in, but Creed is proof that the Rocky franchise is the rare exception. Granted, some Rocky movies aren’t exactly knockouts, but Creed got things back on track and showed that it’s game for a few more rounds.

By serving as both a sequel and a spin-off/soft reboot, Creed gave the franchise a breath of new life.

It passed the gloves on to Michael B. Jordan as the eponymous character.  Creed 2 is right around the corner. Let’s see if it can do what the original saga failed to do and deliver a second outing that’s as good as the inaugural entry.

16 Worst: Leprechaun 2 (0%)

The first Leprechaun movie doesn’t come close to being certified fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, so it should come as no surprise that the sequels didn’t receive any critical acclaim. Especially not the second movie, which no critic seemed to enjoy at all.

Here, the infamous critter resurfaces in Los Angeles to find a bride, which leads to him abducting a young woman and trying to claim her as his own. This isn’t high art by any means, nor does it try to be.

15 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (96%)

The Harry Potter books were an emotional roller coaster that affected millions of readers worldwide. Reliving those adventures on the big screen was also a great time to be alive, and the grand finale lived up to expectations. In the final installment of the saga about the Boy Who Lived and his fight against the forces of darkness, the ultimate showdown finally happens as our hero and his pals face off against Voldemort in Hogwarts castle.

It’s a true epic in every sense of the word.

As far as wrapping up the story goes, Death Hallows: Part 2 delivered the goods and gave us cinematic closure in style.

14 Worst: Looking Who’s Talking Now (0%)

Look Who’s Talking is a perfectly serviceable comedy that should never have received any sequels. In a bid to end to the trilogy on a high following the disappointing previous sequel, Look Who’s Talking Too, someone thought it would be a good idea to introduce talking dogs to the mix for the series’ swan song. 

Needless to say, Look Who’s Talking Now wasn’t the glorious goodbye the series was looking for, but at least the film did cast some cute dogs.

13 Best: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (97%)

The third installment of Sergio Leone’s influential Dollars trilogy, The Good, The Bad and the Ugly is the creme de la creme of spaghetti westerns. 

The story centers around two men who form an uneasy alliance following a scam.

This leads them on a quest as it turns out there’s money buried in the desert and they want to find it. However, they have to compete against another who won’t hesitate to put a bullet in them to claim the prize. On top of being one of the most acclaimed movies out there, the film has been hailed as a major influence on directors like Quentin Tarantino.

12 Best: The Godfather: Part II (97%)

The continuation of Francis Ford Coppola’s Best Picture-winning 1972 crime saga, The Godfather: Part II chronicles Michael Corleone’s further ascendency in organized crime while simultaneously taking us back to the past to explore his dad’s humble beginnings.

Like its predecessor, the sequel also won Best Picture and is hailed by many a critic and film buff as one of the best movies ever made. Whether it’s better than the original is up for debate, but they’re like two sides of the same coin. These movies set the bar for mob pictures, and to this day, other directors are still trying to recreate the formula.

11 Mad Max: Fury Road (97%)

Director George Miller was in his seventies when he unleashed Mad Max: Fury Road, but the energy and madness imbued in every frame of this extravaganza suggest a man half his age.

Maybe we’ll never see another Mad Max movie, but the world needs a Furiosa spin-off eventually.

Fury Road is essentially one non-stop chase that barely lets up from the get-go all the way to the climactic ending. Furthermore, it’s a movie that defied expectation by taking the focus away from the titular character and making Charlize Theron’s Furiosa the real hero of the adventure. 

10 Worst: Jaws: The Revenge (0%)

Is Jaws: the Revenge a good movie? Definitely not. Is it an entertaining movie, though? Definitely yes.

How many other movies have sharks that make a conscious decision to get revenge on the humans that wronged them? Not only that, but the shark here followed its target to the Bahamas from Massachusetts. And why would someone who wants to avoid sharks go to an island surrounded by ocean? The movie is illogical, silly, nonsense, but it does offer sheer entertainment value for bad movie buffs.

9 Best: Aliens (98%)

Alien and Aliens are quite different in some regards, but they complement each other perfectly. The first is an exercise in pure suspense and terror. The sequel, on the other hand, retains the horror elements but adds a lot more action to proceedings.

Aliens shows how to make a successful sequel: acknowledge what came before but don’t be afraid to bring some fresh ideas to the table.

James Cameron was on fire in the ’80s and he wasn’t afraid to make Ridley Scott’s baby his own.

8 Best: Mad Max 2: Road Warrior (98%)

While George Miller’s inaugural Mad Max caper is a cult classic, most film buffs would agree that a couple of the sequels are slightly superior. Taking nothing away from the first movie, Road Warrior is a vast improvement when it comes to world building and sheer action spectacle. The story follows the eponymous character as he helps a group of people steal oil from a tyrannical madman and his band of goons.

As far as cinematic thrill rides go, few movies are on par with Road Warrior. Here, Miller turned up the volume significantly by making the post-apocalyptic terrains feel more dangerous and the action sequences more gung-ho and grander in scale.

7 Best: Evil Dead 2 (98%)

Sam Raimi’s first Evil Dead movie was a huge achievement for independent filmmaking when it was released back in 1981. The movie still holds up to this day with its innovative camera work, effective scares, and excellent cast as well.

The sequel is a triumph in its own right.

While the first movie contained moments of dark comedy, the sequel amps up the zaniness to become what is essentially the splatter flick equivalent of a Laurel and Hardy flick. For 90 minutes, Bruce Campbell is tormented by laughing ornaments and his own severed hand. As silly as that sounds, Evil Dead 2 still manages to pack more punch than your average MMA fighter.

6 Worst: Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol (0%)

In the third installment of the Police Academy franchise, the cops are understaffed and in need of some help. Naturally, the force turns to America’s civilians to help aid in their mission. Things don’t go smoothly, for the characters in the film and the movie itself.

Rotten Tomatoes describes Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol as “Utterly, completely, thoroughly and astonishingly unfunny” and  a movie which sent “a once-innocuous franchise plummeting to agonizing new depths.” That sounds about right.

5 Toy Story 3 (99%)

Few franchises manage to strike three home runs in a row. Even The Godfather stuttered when it came to the third outing. Toy Story, on the other hand, never ceases to replicate the magic time and time again.

This emotional installment sees Andy get ready to leave for college and neglect his old toys.

He’s all grown up and has no use for them anymore, and what ensues is what is by far the most heartfelt movie in the series.

4 Worst: Highlander II: The Quickening (0%)

As far as pure entertaining action-fantasy goes, the first Highlander movie is a fun slice of popcorn entertainment that aficionados of cult cinema lose their head over. The sequel, meanwhile, is an incomprehensible mess.

Highlander II is too overplotted to explain, but the cusp of the story revolves around the hero from the first movie taking on a corporation after being led to believe that they don’t have the world’s best interests in mind. In this one, our hero is a defender of the ozone as well. What makes Highlander II so awful is that it completely retcons everything good about the original film and the mythology it introduced.

3 Best: The Bride of Frankenstein (100%)

We all desire to be loved by someone special– even bolt-head monsters made up of the remains of other people. But to find them a mate, one must dig up some more corpses and create a suitable partner that’s similar in genetic make-up. This is also the storyline behind James Whale’s 1935 masterpiece, Bride of Frankenstein.

There are too many Frankenstein movies to keep track of at this point, but this sequel remains the pinnacle of the original series.

The movie is a masterpiece that successfully blends campy fun with Gothic beauty and genuine chills that’s stood the test of time as a result.

2 Paddington 2 (100%)

No one expected the the first Paddington to be as good as it is. That movie is a bona fide classic in the making in its own right, but the sequel is some next-next level brilliance.

Paddington 2 sees the lovable bear go to prison and, unsurprisingly, all the mean criminals fall in love with him as well. Critics, like the fictional convicts, were also full of praise for the titular bear and his second big onscreen adventure as well. At one point, Paddington 2 was even the best reviewed movie in history.

1 Best: Toy Story 2 (100%)

Following up a movie like Toy Story was never going to be easy, but that didn’t stop Pixar from trying and succeeding. In this one, we find out that Woody is a collectible when he’s discovered and stolen by a greedy museum owner. Naturally this prompts Buzz Lightyear, Mr. Potato, and the rest of the gang into action and they set out to save their friend.

General consensus on Rotten Tomatoes states that Toy Story 2 is that rare sequel that improves upon its predecessor.

The sequel raises the stakes and ups the element of adventure while retaining the humor and heart that made audiences fall in love with the franchise in the first place.

What’s your favorite sequel? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-10 04:10:39 – Kieran Fisher

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween Review – A Pretty Slappy Sequel

Goosebumps 2 lacks the charm and inventiveness of its predecessor, but still has a reasonable amount of spoopy entertainment value to offer.

R.L. Stine’s beloved 1990s children’s horror book series makes its way back to the big screen in Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween, a sequel to the live-action film adaptation of Stine’s novels that came out in 2015. While Jack Black starred as a fictional version of Stine in that movie, Sony didn’t even confirm the actor’s return for the followup until a few weeks before its release. Similarly, neither the director, writer, nor supporting cast of the (generally well-received) first Goosebumps film worked on the second installment. While Haunted Halloween certainly suffers for it, the sequel isn’t an entirely hollow continuation of the franchise either. Goosebumps 2 lacks the charm and inventiveness of its predecessor, but still has a reasonable amount of spoopy entertainment value to offer.

Goosebumps 2 picks up in the small town of Wardenclyffe, New York, as its residents prepare for the fast-approaching Halloween Night festivities. Meanwhile, in the Quinn household, high school senior Sarah (Madison Iseman) is trying to finish her college application and her younger brother Sonny (Jeremy Ray Taylor) is struggling with his science class project – a miniature replica of an experimental wireless transmission station in Wardenclyffe that was built and designed by Nikola Tesla, but never finished (aka. the Tesla Tower). The Quinns are joined by Sonny’s best friend Sam Carter (Caleel Harris), who is staying over at their house while his parents are away for the Halloween holiday.

After some prodding from Sam, Sonny agrees to take a break from his project and clear out an abandoned local house, as part of the duo’s ongoing efforts to launch a (successful) junk cleanup business. While there, however, the pair stumble upon an incomplete manuscript for a Goosebumps novel, unaware that the building was once owned by R.L. Stine himself. Not knowing any better, Sam and Sonny unlock the book and inadvertently unleash the Goosebumps villain Slappy the Dummy back into the real world. While the living ventriloquist dummy seems (sorta) friendly at first, it’s not long before he reveals his true evil plan, with only Sam, Sonny and Sarah to stand in his way.

If the original Goosebumps movie was a throwback to the popular family-friendly spooky adventures of the 1990s (think Hocus Pocus), then Haunted Halloween is closer to being the 2018 equivalent of a direct-to cable scary movie for kids from the ’90s – that is, noticeably cheaper and more generic, yet otherwise harmless and playful in its own right. The Goosebumps 2 script by Rob Lieber (Peter Rabbit) likewise carries over the first movie’s imaginative premise and conceit (e.g. Stine’s Goosebumps novel manuscripts are really enchanted objects which contain and prevent his “demons” from entering the real world) and includes references to its story, yet never really tries to build on its concepts, much less its themes and lore. Instead, Haunted Halloween offers helpful, if unchallenging, life lessons for kids and a serviceable narrative that doesn’t exactly push the envelope for the larger Goosebumps brand.

At the same time, Goosebumps 2 is perhaps more successful than its predecessor when it comes to being genuinely menacing and scary for the juice box crowd, yet still light-hearted enough to avoid traumatizing them (hence, “spoopy”). Much of the credit for that goes to director Ari Sandel (The DUFF), who does a commendable job of combining suspenseful and creepy storytelling with comedic moments here, much like Stine did so well in his original Goosebumps novels. Haunted Halloween, as indicated earlier, feels like a lower-budgeted affair than the first Goosebumps, yet Sandel and his creative team – including, DP Barry Peterson (Game Night) and production designer Rusty Smith (Get Out) – still manage to deliver a movie that’s a proper cut above a comparable TV film, in terms of overall craftsmanship. That also goes for the CGI and creature effects in the sequel’s first half (more on the second half later).

The actual setting of Haunted Halloween is mostly populated by stock types, be they the film’s young heroes or the local bullies that Sonny and Sam have to deal with (not to mention, Sarah’s dishonest would-be boyfriend). While their characters are fairly two-dimensional in the Goosebumps sequel, Harris, Iseman and Ray nevertheless have the same affable screen presence that’s allowed them to stand out in films and TV shows past and, thus, make their protagonists all the easier to root for. That also goes for the adult supporting players here, as Wendi McLendon-Covey (The Goldbergs) and Ken Jeong (Community) mostly channel their famous small screen personas as Sarah and Sonny’s adorkable mother Kathy and their eccentric neighbor Mr. Chu, respectively. As for Black as R.L. Stine: his own role in Goosebumps 2 is pretty superfluous, which is disappointing considering the energy that he brought to the proceedings as the first Goosebumps‘ co-protagonist (not to mention, his vocal performance as Slappy, which Black didn’t reprise in the sequel).

All in all, Haunted Halloween is a passable if derivative sequel – but not because the Goosebumps books themselves are incapable of sustaining multiple films. Rather, the problem is that the sequel recycles too much from the first movie and struggles to make creative use of the fresh elements (like the real-world Tesla Tower) that it brings into the mix here. It’s too bad, seeing as Goosebumps 2 had a wealth of different monsters and horror genres in Stine’s source novels to draw from, yet elected to continue simplifying the author’s mythology by making Slappy the big bad (again) and skimping on giving the other creatures much in the way of personality. As a result, the second half of the movie plays out as a watered down version of what happened in the original Goosebumps, albeit with lower production values and emotional impact.

Still, Goosebumps 2 should go over best with its young target demographic and provide them with enough silly scares and fun adventure to keep them engaged for its brisk runtime. Moreover, much like your average comic book movie these days, Haunted Halloween delivers its fair share of Goosebumps easter eggs and nods to the real Stine’s source material (right down to a Stan Lee-esque cameo from Stine himself), to further serve the property’s youngest fans. As for those who prefer their family-friendly fantasies with Jack Black starring front and center – The House with a Clock in Its Walls is still playing in theaters and ought to fulfill your own needs for some spoopy entertainment this Halloween season.

TRAILER

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween begins playing in U.S. theaters on Thursday evening, October 11. It is 90 minutes long and is rated PG for scary creature action and images, some thematic elements, rude humor and language.

Let us know what you thought of the film in the comments section!



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2018-10-10 01:10:58 – Sandy Schaefer

Little Mermaid Rumor: Lady Gaga Possibly Up for Ursula Role

Disney is rumored to want Lady Gaga as part of their live-action The Little Mermaid movie cast. The Mouse House has found great success remaking films from their animated library in a new way. These big budget live-action takes on the stories have made the studio billions, and that’s only the beginning, with properties like The Lion KingAladdin, and Mulan on their way in the next two years. One of the other IPs they’re looking to bring to the big screen in this new light is beloved film The Little Mermaid.

The studio has been mulling a live-action Little Mermaid for the past two years, and some progress has been made. Even before the buzz for Mary Poppins Returns truly begins, Disney reportedly already courted its director Rob Marshall to tackle this next. There’s still no indication when the movie will be made, but the latest rumor shares which rising star Disney is reportedly eyeing.

Related: All the Live-Action Disney Remakes In Development

The Disinsider shared a rumor regarding a name they’ve heard is high up on Disney’s wish list for a role in Little Mermaid: Lady Gaga. The outlet notes that this is an unconfirmed report they are hearing, and one that Disney representatives declined to comment on, so this rumor should be treated as such and taken with a grain of salt for now. However, if this is true, it’s believed that Gaga is being considered for the villain role in the movie as Ursula.

Gaga is currently enjoying overwhelming praise for her performance in Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut A Star Is Born. Her efforts both as an actress and as a singer in the movie have blown away critics and general moviegoers alike. This buzz also reportedly had her in consideration for a role in Birds of Prey. That didn’t pan out, and now it could be Disney’s live-action department that adds her. It would be a huge coup for the project, and give them someone with legitimate talent as a singer to bring the sea witch to life.

The prospect of Gaga joining Little Mermaid comes on the heels of Zendaya previously being rumored to have an offer on the table to play Ariel. That has yet to be confirmed too, but the rising actress is open to taking on the role. A potential Little Mermaid live-action movie led by Zendaya and Lady Gaga would be quite the impressive start to the cast. If either or both do join the movie, expect Disney to go after similarly big names for the roles of Eric, King Triton, and the voices of Flounder and Sebastian. Hopefully these castings do pan out, and some official updates on The Little Mermaid aren’t too far away.

MORE: What Zendaya Could Look Like As Disney’s Live-Action Little Mermaid

Source: The Disinsider



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2018-10-09 06:10:26 – Cooper Hood

15 Rules The Cast Of Counting Cars Is Forced To Obey

The guys working at Count’s Kustoms may not seem like a the type who are keen on rule-following, and, for the most part, that is true. There really aren’t all that many stated rules in the domain of Danny Koker and crew, but everyone has lines that they would prefer remain uncrossed.

That said, Danny and the crew of Counting Cars do have a few unstated laws that must be adhered to on the set. While the History network may not be as interested in staging dramatics and scenarios as their competitors, that isn’t to say that they haven’t laid out a few orders which need to be followed in order to keep the show interesting for the viewer. It may betray the tough guy bravado of the show, but rules are rules, no matter how many hot rods you’ve restored.

Some of these rules are relatively petty and simple, while others might raise an eyebrow or two and hint at a darker history behind these Las Vegas-based body shop workers. Danny, Mike and company haven’t caused all that many controversies when compared to some other big-name reality TV stars out there, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t have a couple of skeletons in their closet. Again, there don’t appear to be all that many hard-and-fast rules on the set of Counting Cars, but there are at least a few things that cast members know to keep an eye out for.

Here are the 15 Rules The Cast Of Counting Cars Is Forced To Obey.

15 Only Approach Certain People About Their Cars

A major focal point of many Counting Cars episodes is Danny’s frequent run-ins with random car owners. He’s often been filmed approaching people on the street or following someone home in order to track them down and make a deal for their car. These moments are, as most viewers may have guessed, almost always staged.

This is a pretty important rule for the cast to follow, however, as following hot rod owners home and offering to buy their cars is a pretty good way to creep out your clientele and make viewers think you’re a huge weirdo.

While Danny may have done something like this once or twice in his private life, these instances are commonly pre-arranged for the show. Stalking someone with the intent of bartering for their car is probably illegal anyway, though it does make for some interesting TV. Most of the Counting Cars guys aren’t actors by trade, either, and their performance sort of ruins the facade at times.

14 Get Every Fact Straight

If there’s one rule that Danny Koker does his best to follow, it is this one. Danny and the rest of the Counting Cars crew have frequently been called out and ridiculed by trivia-loving car aficionados for small mistakes they have made on air. Event the smallest of inaccuracies get pointed out, and it may call the integrity of Count’s Kustoms into question for the hardest of the hardcore.

For instance, Danny was once noted to have been incorrect about the year in which Chevy first started producing the Corvette: he said it was 1954, but it was actually 1952. It is a mistake he has yet to live down in some circles, and he’s since been sure to get his facts straight when he’s on camera.

13 Keep an Eye Out

Again, this isn’t necessarily a written rule, and it may seem like common sense for most business owners, but Danny and the rest of the guys working at Count’s Kustoms need to do their best to make sure burglary and theft aren’t taking place under their noses. This may sound like a no-brainer, but these things have happened more than once in the autoshop’s history.

From stolen trailers to ransacked houses and full-on employee embezzlement cases, Counting Cars hasn’t had a totally spotless run.

As a result, the guys at Count’s Kustoms need to keep an eye on their surroundings as well as on their co-workers, which doesn’t exactly create grounds for a healthy work environment.

12 The Customer is Always Right

The guys at Count’s Kustoms have taken on some pretty ludicrous jobs over the years, and this is partially because, as a rule, they try not to refuse any customization requests. This definitely isn’t something that’s been set in stone, as Koker and his employees have certainly turned some people away over the course of the show’s history, but it rarely ever happens.

Though they specialize in motorcycles and cars, the Counting Cars crew has accepted vans, busses, and even boats in the past, which certainly made for some interesting TV. It probably isn’t in Danny’s best interest to take on literally every project which comes through his door, but they certainly seem to try.

11 Keep Them Coming

Time is money, and the crew working behind the scenes at Count’s Kustoms sure like to keep busy. Though Counting Cars never really gets into the inner workings of the shop, Danny has said that they never have fewer than fifteen projects going at one time.

Given that each project is a pretty hefty investment in terms of time and resources, this is a pretty major commitment.

As a result, Count’s Kustoms has taken on a bunch of new employees over the years, and they don’t seem to show any signs of slowing down any time soon. Though the show’s popularity may eventually fade, Danny and his employee’s work probably won’t.

10 Stick to the Budget

Danny Koker is known to be very conservative both politically and fiscally. He is extremely protective of his money despite the fact that he has plenty of it to spare, and he never overspends except in very particular situations. Though it may not be an explicitly laid out rule in his shop, Danny’s employees are doubtlessly aware of the fact that they really need to stick to a budget.

The Count himself has shown his financially conservative nature when haggling, and he has been known to walk away from deals he finds unfair. This doesn’t show up all that often in the show, of course, because most of the drama is scripted and most of the bartering has already been pre-arranged. Those close to Danny, however, will know the truth.

9 Don’t Rush It

Count’s Kustoms may take on no fewer than fifteen projects at a time, but most of these projects take quite a while to complete. This is never really shown on the show, though, as the Counting Cars producers like to expedite things for the sake of viewer interest, but customization jobs are known to take 12 to 24 months to complete on average.

This may sound like an insane amount of time, but there really aren’t many places in the world that offer customization options like Count’s Kustoms.

Though some projects cruise through the shop in as little as ninety days, most employees know not to rush things.

8 Don’t Mention Danny’s Dad

Danny Koker’s father, a well-respected man who taught Danny everything he knows about autobody customization, bequeathed his extensive collection of rare cars to his son when he passed away. These vehicles hold an incredible amount of sentimental value to the Count’s Kustoms owner, and, though he has shown parts of the collection off in recent years, he doesn’t like to work on them.

Danny has said that his father’s passing is still a tough subject for him, and, as a result, most of his employees know better than to bring it up. In fact, even Counting Cars regulars should know better than to mention those cars or suggest working on them. While this may one day change, it remains a point of contention in Danny’s garage.

7 Don’t Bring up the Bandana

This really isn’t an unspoken rule, as Danny’s look has been the subject of occasional workplace antics over the years, but it should be said that Danny doesn’t seem all that keen to reveal what’s going on underneath his iconic bandana.

Many have speculated that he is covering some sort of facial deformity or unsightly tattoo, while others believe that he is abnormally committed to his rock-and-roll look.

The most likely explanation is that he isn’t eager to show off his receding hairline. Though this is little more than speculation, it does explain why Danny is often pretty defensive in regards to his dress. Those close to him might poke fun, but fans may want to avoid the subject.

6 Be Careful When Haggling

Danny Koker has stated on multiple occasions that the success of his show has made haggling at car shows much more difficult. As a typical enthusiast, the Count never seemed to have a problem getting his way on the showroom floor.

However, once his profile was raised, sellers began recognizing him more often and attempting to upsell him. This has become a major headache to the penny-pinching autobody overhauler, and anyone working with him should ensure that they don’t overpay when bartering. Danny is most likely very grateful for all of the good that the show has done his business over the years, though he could almost certainly go without this one annoying quirk.

5 Don’t Mention Danny’s Family

In keeping with his conservative values, Danny Koker typically doesn’t like to reveal all that much about his family or his private life. This is completely fair, and most Counting Cars fans will understand that his reality TV star status doesn’t require him to relay all of his personal matters to the public.

That said, Danny is abnormally protective of his loved ones, and very little is known about his wife and kids.

His wife, Korie Koker, co-owns Count’s Vamp’d Rock Bar & Grill with her husband, though her private life remains largely undisclosed. Counting Cars cast members should almost certainly know better than to go prying into Danny’s personal life while the cameras are rolling.

4 Don’t Break The Fourth Wall

The guys on Counting Cars may seem like larger-than-life celebrities at times, but it is important to remember that they are actually people, and Count’s Kustoms is an actual business that will continue to operate independently of the show once the production crew heads home.

That said, though it may be an actual business, much of the situations covered on the show aren’t genuine. Whether played up for the sake of drama or totally fictional, much of the on-air hijinx covered on Counting Cars is dramatized. The Counting Cars cast is careful not to break the illusion, though, and everyone seems pretty eager to play along. There seems to be a rule against fourth wall breaks while on set, and it seems to have gone pretty much unbroken over the years.

3 Politics Are a No-Go

In today’s radically partisan climate, few shows are all that eager to take sides or show any sort of political bias at all. That said, Counting Cars star Danny Koker was an avid supporter of the current leader of the United States during his campaign in 2016. This should come as no surprise given his conservative background, but it remains a major point of contention among many viewers.

Rather than bring up a potentially costly political debate on-air, the Counting Cars crew is pretty careful to keep their lips sealed concerning the subject.

The time may well come when things of that nature can be discussed more freely, but Count’s Kustoms is better off free of political drama for the time being.

2 Forget About Scott Jones

Scott Jones, the ornery store manager featured in the first and second seasons of Counting Cars, isn’t brought up all that much these days. He was hardly mentioned at all in the third season, and he seems to have been totally absent from every subsequent episode since then.

Fans have speculated that he was actually fired as a result of an embezzlement scheme, while others believe he simply grew tired of the daily grind and returned to his hometown. It’s tough to know exactly what happened to Jones, though none of the Counting Cars cast members seem all that eager to bring it up. This probably isn’t an explicitly stated rule, but most will know better than to bring up Scott on camera.

1 Don’t Deal With Vince Neil

Show lead and shop owner Danny Koker has met quite a few celebrities through his business, and his rock-and-roll band side project has also put him in contact with some pretty interesting characters. Koker has, in one way or another, come to be pretty good friends with ex-Motley Crue vocalist Vince Neil.

Though it started out as a pretty lucrative relationship for Koker and his show, the Counting Cars cast soon decided that their relationship with Neil was detrimental to the show’s good standing.

After that, they by-and-large disbanded any professional connections to the singer, though Koker and Neil are said to have remained friends. Even so, it isn’t likely that the ex-rocker will be making any appearances on the show any time soon. The bottom line is that Vince is bad news, and the cast can’t mention him anymore.

Are there any other rules that the cast of Counting Cars has to follow? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-09 05:10:54 – Tanner Fox

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey Beginners Gameplay Tips

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is here, and it offers up something of a different experience from the previous games in the series. Rather than the stealth-based gameplay of old, Odyssey doubles down on the RPG mechanics, becoming a huge, deep open world game for players to enjoy. In essence, it takes what worked from Assassin’s Creed Origins and makes it even better.

The end result is a fantastic take on the Greek myth, albeit one that sometimes struggles a little to bridge the gap between open world RPG and its roots in the larger Assassin’s Creed universe. Nonetheless, those changes could leave some players a bit confused as to where to start, and after working through the opening island of Kephallonia things could become a little bit daunting.

Related: Assassin’s Creed Odyssey – How To Get The Best Ending

That said, there are some ways to make the most of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey from the get go. After all, there’s lot to get to grips with before taking on Medusa or hunting after all those legendary armor sets. Instead, here are some tips for how to take up what Assassin’s Creed Odyssey has to offer fast.

Choose Exploration Mode

The most important first choice to make comes before the player even starts the game. When given the option, it’s highly recommended to choose Exploration Mode as the method of play. This is the way that Assassin’s Creed Odyssey was designed to be played, and for good reason; the additional level of emphasis on discovery is a delight to play, and much more fun than simply following map markers to reach objectives.

Effectively, Exploration Mode works by making the player find their own way through quests. NPCs will give hints towards locations to be discovered when talking about the mission in question, forcing players to use a little of their own intuition. This mode also makes map exploration much more fun, with the player finding random locations as they work their way around the regions hunting down quests.

Exploration Mode also means players will make the most out of eagle companion Ikaros. The eagle is not only able to scout out discovered locations, but also target enemies and notable items within specific locations, such as chests or hostages to release. Finally, remember to seek out Synchronization points to boost the power of Ikaros overall.

Think About Crafting Over Cash

Whether armor or weapons, it’s easy to find loot in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. As such, when players notice they have plenty of unused items sitting around in their inventory, it’s extremely tempting to drop them all off at a nearby blacksmith and make a bit of drachmae.

That said, it’s probably best to hold fire of cashing in. That’s because drachmae are not in short supply in the game, and can be picked up from completing quests, in explored locations, or from dead enemies. Instead, consider breaking down weaker weapons and armor into leather, wood, and metal, as these can be useful as crafting for upgrades to the player’s ship or even to beef up items at a blacksmith.

It’s worth bearing in mind that drachmae are needed in a couple of places in the game, and it’s always worth keeping some around in case of having to pay off a bounty to keep mercenaries off the player’s trail when it’s better to lay low. Nonetheless, put money on the back burner, and instead think about how best to boost the overall power of the misthios.

Choose Your Abilities Wisely

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey has a fairly comprehensive skill tree, but there are some abilities that are better to unlock than others. As explained in our guide to the best abilities to unlock first, There are a few essential abilities, with the Sparta Kick being useful from a warrior perspective alongside beef ups to the assassin skill tree such as Shadow Assassin.

Overall, though, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey gives players the greatest level of flexibility in how they choose to play that the series has seen so far. It’s perhaps best to pick and choose skills based on what works for the player in question, providing they keep enough core skills in each area to make sure they can get out of trouble whatever the situation.

Remember you can always change your choices as well, albeit at a cost. A few drachmae allows the player to reset all of their abilities, so if some skills are found to be less useful than others, it’s easy to drop them and rebuild the character from scratch.

Take To The Waters With Style

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey takes the series back to the high seas, and it’s something that is long overdue. With gameplay reminiscent of Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag, the core way to travel between the different islands is to take to the Adrestia and hop from island to island seeking adventure.

Even though a lot of the gameplay takes place on land, it’s truly beneficial to upgrade the ship regularly. This could mean recruiting new lieutenants, which helps both with buffs to the ship’s power and when boarding enemy vessels, or improving things like rowing power or damage caused by ranged attacks. It comes at a cost in terms of drachmae and consumables, but it’s worth it in the long run.

This is because it’s all too easy to get into scraps with pirates, Spartan or Athenian vessels when out at sea. Naval combat is extremely good fun, but when outnumbered it’s much better to have more firepower onside, and it’s always satisfying to take out those Cult of Kosmos members who happen to captain a ship of their own.

Revel In The Game World

It may feel like an obvious rule to follow, but Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is much more fun if taken at the player’s own pace. The title’s story is a compelling, personal adventure that (generally) ties well into the larger plot of Assassin’s Creed, but the game perhaps works best with the player following their own path and doing what’s most fun to them.

As such, it’s important to stretch your legs in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. Between the Conquest Battles, side quests and other additional smaller elements of the game at large, there’s no reason to purely stick to the main quest. This is something the game expects, too – there’s no real reason to grind in the game, providing players make good use of the enthralling, extra content available to them.

Perhaps the best examples of this are the game’s mercenary system, which leads to some excellent one-on-one fights with fearsome combatants, and hunting down the Cult of Kosmos. Although the cult ties into the larger plot as a whole, hunting down smaller members is a fantastic element of the game, and one that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Those are just a few tips to help players make the most of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. However, with a game as expansive as this, players are best suited to decide how best they want to play the game. Regardless of how they choose to enjoy the title, there are bound to be some surprises along the way.

More: Every Assassin’s Creed Game Ranked



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2018-10-09 03:10:13 – Rob Gordon

Making A Murderer Part 2 Trailer: The Conviction Was Just The Beginning

Part 2 of Netflix’s true-crime docuseries Making a Murderer is set to stream on October 19, according to the first trailer. The new season is an anticipated follow-up to one of the most talked-about true-crime series in recent memory. The original series, which premiered in 2015, joined the likes of Serial and HBO’s The Jinx, as not only captivating television (or podcasts), but also highly influential series with real-world implications. The two subjects of Making a Murderer, Steven Avery and his newphew Brendan Dassey, had their convictions investigated — and in Dassey’s case, overturned before being upheld again — by a lengthy and fraught legal battle that is now the subject of the series’ second season. 

That Netflix would want to capitalize on the fervor of the first season is no surprise, but given that the follow-up was announced soon after the first season became a sensation, it is rather surprising the streaming service was willing to wait as long as it did for more. That certainly works in favor of the new episodes, as not only does it feel less opportunistic, but it also presents a greater likelihood that there will be more new information viewers were perhaps unaware of. 

More: Titans Premiere Review: Mature Content Doesn’t Make For Mature Storytelling

The trailer for Making a Murderer Part 2 plays out less as a follow-up to season 1 than a response to the furor it caused. The new season focuses its attentions on the efforts by attorney Kathleen Zellner to overturn the conviction of Avery and Dassey, and there’s plenty of seemingly compelling evidence presented to make is seem as though Zellner, her team, and Avery have a fighting chance. Check out the trailer below:

“Netflix presents the highly-anticipated second chapter of the critically acclaimed, Emmy Award-winning original documentary series Making a Murderer, which followed the unprecedented journey of Steven Avery from DNA exoneree and reformer to convicted murderer. Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos return to the Midwest where they have exclusive access to Steven Avery and his co-defendant and nephew Brendan Dassey, their families and the legal teams fighting for justice on their behalf.  Over the course of 10 new episodes, Making a Murderer Part 2 provides an in-depth look at the high-stakes post-conviction process, exploring the emotional toll the process takes on all involved.”

Of course, with all true crime documentaries, the news and the internet will beat them to the punch, so what they offer will be a more in-depth look at the process of overturning a conviction and, presumably, the evidence that will once again get viewers creating petitions to overturn a murder conviction. Whether Making a Murderer Part 2 will be the phenomenon season 1 was remains to be seen, but true-crime obsessives won’t have to wait long to get their fix. 

Next: The Man In The High Castle Season 3 Review: More Sci-Fi Action Refocuses The Series

Making a Murderer part 2 will stream on Netflix on Friday, October 19.



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2018-10-09 01:10:40 – Kevin Yeoman

Better Call Saul Season 4 Finale Ending Explained

This post contains SPOILERS for Better Call Saul

Better Call Saul’s fourth season ended with “Winner,” an exciting finale that inches the spinoff closer to its Breaking Bad roots. This year, AMC’s acclaimed drama had to followup the jaw-dropping cliffhanger of season 3, where Chuck died in a horrifying fire. That tragedy is what truly spurred Jimmy McGill’s transformation into Saul Goodman as he dealt with the consequences and aftermath of not only his brother’s death, but also his bar suspension. Over the course of the fourth season, Jimmy became more involved with the criminal underworld of Albuquerque, launching his “get-rich-quick” scheme of selling prepaid cell phones to unsavory individuals.

Elsewhere in the Saul universe, Gus Fring looked to expand his cartel operations, commissioning the construction of the famous “super lab” Walter White and Jesse Pinkman cooked in during Breaking Bad. Entrusting Mike Ehrmantraut to oversee the operation, Gus hired a group of German nationals led by Werner Ziegler. While the project was taking longer than originally planned, the crew was working diligently and hoped to have it finished soon. Of course, things hit a snag at the end of last week’s “Wiedersehen” when Werner went AWOL, leaving only a note with detailed instructions for his team. These storylines (Werner’s disappearance and Jimmy’s bar reinstatement appeal) are the crux of the finale’s narrative, with both resolving in powerful ways.

The Tragedy of Werner Ziegler

Throughout the season, Werner’s team were recurring players, frequently interacting with Mike. Early on, it looked like Kai would be the troublemaker of the group, especially after his incident with the nightclub. However, Kai turned out to be a red herring, and Werner caused the biggest headaches for Gus and Mike. Werner, of course, is far from home and dearly misses his beloved wife. Wishing to see her again, Werner pitched Mike the idea of going home for a weekend, but was denied. Since he couldn’t get his superiors’ approval, Werner took matters into his own hands and hatched a plot for a loving reunion.

“Winner” reveals Werner ran off to a resort where he planned to spend time with his wife. He made travel arrangements that would see her fly over to America for a weekend and go back home. Sadly for Werner, he never gets to see her again. Mike tracks him down and after a discussion with Gus, realizes there’s only one resolution for this setback. Allowing Werner the opportunity to call his wife and tell her to return home before Gus’ people do anything to her, Mike then (reluctantly) kills Werner. Ehrmantraut says Werner’s death will be covered up as a tragic accident and his men will be sent back. As one might expect, Gus is angered by the lack of progress on the super lab (cutting a conversation with Gale short), which he thought would be completed by now.

Related: How Better Call Saul’s (Unseen) Breaking Bad Character Connects To Jimmy

Werner clearly had no ill intent (Mike knew he was jut homesick), but when he ran off, his fate was essentially sealed. This was the second transgression Werner committed against Gus – the first being his friendly chat about construction work with bar patrons. These two incidents back-to-back made it very difficult for Gus to trust Werner moving forward, and by now, fans are well aware of Fring’s ruthlessness. Mike mentions multiple times in the episode there are other ways to go about things, but he can’t convince Gus to spare Werner’s life. No amount of begging or pleading has any effect on Gus when he’s made up his mind about something. Unfortunately for Werner, he never completely understood what he got himself into and crossed the wrong people.

Lalo also factors into this storyline, with the mysterious member of the Salamanca clan tailing Mike and trying to locate Werner for his own reasons. Lalo does discover which resort Werner is staying at and briefly speaks to the Russian over the phone, posing as one of Gus’ employees. Not knowing any better, Werner begins to tell Lalo the first couple of basic instructions for the super lab construction, before Mike arrives in person and interrupts the call. Near the end of the episode, Mike tells Gus about what happened, and it’ll be fascinating to see how this continues in season 5. Of course, Fring does not get along with the Salamancas, and despite Lalo’s cheeky offer of a peace treaty in last week’s episode, the two warring sides will continue their power struggle. Lalo is clearly curious about what Gus is up to and wants to get an upper hand for himself.

Page 2: Jimmy McGill Becomes Saul Goodman

Jimmy McGill Is Finally Saul Goodman

Jimmy’s arc in season 4 is dealing with the fallout of his felony from season 2 (tampering with Chuck’s documents) as he tries to get by in life with his one-year suspension. Picking up lawful employment at CC Mobile, he does everything he’s supposed to do to work himself back in the graces of the committee. However, last week’s episode ended with the shocking twist that Jimmy was denied reinstatement – after he was found to be insincere in his comments. Kim, as she always does, stays by Jimmy’s side to help him win the appeal. In Kim’s mind, the sincerity issue stems from Chuck and Jimmy needs to show remorse for what’s transpired.

The two forge ahead with another one of their brilliant schemes. Jimmy spends the one-year anniversary of Chuck’s death mourning at his brother’s grave. An “anonymous” donation is made to HHM to name the legal library after Chuck, with members of Jimmy’s go-to video team telling people in attendance they heard the gift was from Jimmy. It all builds up to another hearing in front of the committee, where Jimmy uses the letter Chuck left him as a weapon in his favor. After (faking) being unable to read it in place of an opening statement, Jimmy launches into a nostalgic monologue where he reminisces about his brother, talks about wanting to make Chuck proud, and credits Chuck with influencing his interest in a law career. In their celebration afterwards, Kim feels some it was truthful, but Jimmy’s reaction makes it painfully apparent it was all a show for the committee so he could get his law license back. As he prepares to sign the necessary documents, Jimmy states he’ll no longer be practicing under his legal name. Turning to a clearly shocked Kim, he closes out the season by saying, “S’all good, man.”

Related: Bob Odenkirk Responds to Fan Theory About Chuck’s Letter

At a certain time in his life, Jimmy probably aspired to be an honest, hard-working lawyer like Chuck, but the events of Better Call Saul have rendered that impossible. During a key sequence of the episode, Jimmy (as part of his sincerity scheme) sits on the board awarding scholarships in Chuck’s memory. He vouches for a student named Kristy Esposito, who received only one vote (from Jimmy) because she was found guilty of shoplifting. In that moment, Jimmy realizes that the law community at large will never accept someone with a prior record, and clearly sees himself in the young Kristy. Because of his actions in season 2, the most prominent firms in the country will always consider Jimmy a liability, no matter how much he swears he’s changed. Chasing down Kristy after the scholarship meetings, Jimmy basically lays out the Saul Goodman playbook, telling his favorite student to cut corners and to not worry about what others think (because she’ll never “make it” the traditional way).

Instead of conforming to fit within the perceived standards of the field, Jimmy gamed the system to his own advantage. He told the reinstatement committee what they wanted to hear – even though he has no intention of following through on it – and is now set to play by his own rules. In his argument with Kim on the rooftop in “Wiedersehen,” Jimmy went on the defensive about how Kim views him as “the kind of lawyer guilty people hire” and is unworthy of sharing an office with her (while she thrives at a large firm in New Mexico). Jimmy is embracing his reputation. Saul Goodman, as Breaking Bad fans know, is exactly the type of lawyer criminals hire. Howard Hamlin wouldn’t touch Walter White and Jesse Pinkman with a 10-foot pole, but Saul went into business with them, doing whatever he could to protect his clients’ rights and help them avoid jail time.

The beauty of this is how it all traces back to Chuck and recontextualizes the character of Saul Goodman. When he was introduced in the second season of Breaking Bad, he was nothing more than an entertaining side player; a riff on the “sleazy lawyer” archetype who came up with elaborate schemes to win his cases. Now, the persona is revealed as a last resort for a man who once upon a time looked up to his brother, only to have his hopes and dreams destroyed by that very same sibling. Chuck went out of his way to block Jimmy from getting a position at HHM, fearful of what “Slippin’ Jimmy with a law degree” would be capable of. He wasn’t willing to give Jimmy the benefit of the doubt, and ended up unknowingly launching the career of Albuquerque’s shadiest criminal defense attorney. Maybe if he was more accepting and loving towards Jimmy, things would have turned out differently.

It’ll be exciting to see how the confirmed fifth season picks up on this. There were already hints the Jimmy/Kim relationship was fraying (the wonderfully constructed cold open of “Something Stupid”), and the former’s new career path might be the final straw. Kim is never mentioned in Breaking Bad, so obviously something happens there. Better Call Saul correctly took the long road to get to this point, and now the possibilities for its future are wide open.

More: Better Call Saul Fills In Breaking Bad Gaps



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2018-10-08 07:10:07 – Chris Agar

Joker Set Photos & Video Offer Best Look Yet At Costume & Make-Up

New photos and video from the set of Todd Phillips’ Joker movie offer the best glimpse we’ve seen thus far of the character in costume and make-up. After months of speculation, the movie is finally coming together and each passing day seems to bring more revelations about the Clown Prince of Crime’s solo outing. These pictures and video show star Joaquin Phoenix in full costume and makeup, although it remains unknown if this is indeed Joker’s final look for the film.

Joker will help to launch DC’s new banner, reportedly to be called DC Dark or DC Black, and as such, will not be a part of the DCEU. Few plot details are known, but recent set photos reveal the possibility that Arthur Fleck, as Joker is named in the film, has decided to wage war against the one percent. Fans weren’t immediately receptive to the Batman villain starring in a standalone movie, but the star-studded cast has definitely added to the film’s hype. Aside from Phoenix, the movie boasts Robert De Niro as a talk show host and Marc Maron as his producer. Brett Cullen will be portraying Bruce Wayne’s father, Thomas, with Frances Conroy and Zazie Beetz rounding out this impressive list of performers.

Related: The Possible Inspirations For Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker Makeup

Hollywood Pipeline has posted a video from the set, which appears to be a very hectic scene. Fleck strolls away from the commotion, smoking a cigarette as the cops frantically run right past him. Not only does the villain look extremely calm, but also pretty satisfied with whatever chaos he has left in his wake. Just Jared has published photos from the scene as well. A couple of weeks ago, images surfaced of the Clown Prince of Crime wreaking havoc in an NYC subway station, but this is definitely the best glimpse that we have gotten so far of Phoenix in full Joker garb. Little is known of the plot, but we do know that the film will take place in the 80s, tackling Joker’s backstory as a failed comedian.

CLICK HERE FOR THE NEW JOKER SET PHOTOS

Although there are no less than six Joker movies currently in the works, Phillips’ will be the first to hit theaters. Some fans may have questioned whether or not this film was necessary, but most are excited by the prospect of seeing what an actor of Phoenix’s caliber will do with the role. As the Dark Knight’s most well known adversary, Joker has already been immortalized with more than one iconic performance. Heath Ledger set the bar high with his Oscar-winning depiction, but there was a time when no one thought he could ever live up to Jack Nicholson’s take on the character.

As more set images and videos from Joker continue to emerge, many fans are starting to get excited about this movie. Even famed Batman scribe Scott Snyder is looking forward to Phoenix’s portrayal. Audiences still have a year to wait before the film hits theaters, but from what it known thus far, the project is shaping up to be different than the Joker that viewers are already familiar with.

More: Everything We’ve Learned About Joker From Set Photos

Source: Hollywood Pipeline, Just Jared



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2018-10-08 01:10:57 – Jamie Gerber

Festival trucks offer open-air cinema for everyone to enjoy



The excitement of the 55th Antalya International Film Festival has engulfed the entire city.

Two festival trucks are carrying this excitement across the city, travelling through the districts one by…Click To Continue



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