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Batman Tried To Help Police Defuse An Armed Situation In Canada

A regular citizen dressed as Batman attempted to insert himself into a police matter in Canada last weekend, and was politely turned away. In the Batman franchise, the Caped Crusader has enjoyed a fractured relationship with Gotham City’s police department, at times working alongside cops and on other occasions being relentlessly chased by them, accused of doing just as much harm as the city’s criminal contingent. In Batman’s defense, he is a highly trained ninja and a master detective, while Gotham’s law enforcement is more crooked than Bruce Wayne’s spine after a fight with Bane.

Of course, the small matter of Batman’s peak human conditioning hasn’t stopped regular people all over the world from suiting up and taking to the streets as real-life vigilantes. Inspired by their favorite comic book superheroes, citizens concerned by rising levels of violent crime are now spending their evenings “on patrol” in an attempt to make their neighborhoods safer places to live. Naturally, people take this hobby to different extremes and there are certainly arguments for and against the practice, but the message from law enforcement has been steadfast: leave crime fighting to the pros.

Related: Batman: Hush Animated Movie First Look Image Released

This sentiment was very much lost on an aspiring superhero in Canada last Saturday, as footage recorded by bystander Melissa Parent (via PQB News) demonstrates. Law enforcement had cordoned off a section of road to deal with an incident and had firearms drawn. A passing vehicle then stopped and a man got out in full (possibly Tim Burton-era?) Batsuit. The figure slowly strides up to the scene and appears to ask police if his assistance is required. It wasn’t, obviously, and the Bruce Wayne wannabe trudges back to his Batmobile (a truck with the Batman logo on the back) and heads home. Police later confirmed that they were responding to a domestic incident where a firearm was potentially involved and stated:

“As to the presence of ‘Batman’ at the scene, when there is an unfolding event which is potentially serious in nature, as most people would assume by the fact that members were deployed with Carbines out, the public should remain away from the area as they are putting themselves and the lives of the responding members in jeopardy. Situations like this are dynamic and subject to change very quickly, the presence of ‘Batman’ or anyone else is an unwanted distraction and foolish as they are placing themselves at risk.”

At a surface level, the video footage is certainly amusing in a completely surreal sense. The sight of someone dressed as Batman in broad daylight and trying to fight crime is funny in itself, but watching said person get swiftly turned away and have to get back in their car is something not even the Joker’s twisted mind could envisage.

As the police statement makes clear however, there is a far more serious side to the situation. Not only was “Batman” putting himself in danger by walking towards a situation where guns were drawn, but the time it takes for a cop to tell a do-gooder to back off could prove enough of a distraction for the situation to take a turn for the worse. It’s not clear whether the man in question was genuinely on the lookout for crime to fight, or was heading to a costume party that he’d put far too much effort into, but in either case, the Dark Knight should stick to fighting fictional baddies next time.

More: White House Agency Lists Peter Parker And Bruce Wayne As Interns

Source: PQB News


2019-03-28 10:03:36

Craig Elvy

True Detective Season 3 Gets an Official Premiere Date & New Images

HBO has announced that True Detective season 3 will premiere early next year on Sunday, January 13. Nic Pizzolatto’s crime anthology series hasn’t been on the air since it wrapped its largely-derided second season in August 2015 and went on an extended break, in an effort (on the network’s part) to give the show’s creator more time to deliver a third installment that could better live up to the standard set by the series’ widely-celebrated freshman run. Judging by everything that we know about season 3 thus far, it seems that Pizzolatto is taking a back to basics approach with his latest crime narrative.

True Detective season 3, like season 1, takes place in the U.S. South (the Ozarks in Arkansas, to be exact) and explores a narrative that unfolds across multiple time periods (three, in this case). Oscar-winner Mahershala Ali stars in Pizzolatto’s new crime story as state police detective Wayne Hays, a fellow who (much like season 1 detectives Rust Cohle and Marty Hart before him) is haunted in the present by a case that he originally worked years earlier, back when he was a younger man. As Wayne puts it in the True Detective season 3 teaser trailer, “I want to know the whole story”.

Related: HBO’s Watchmen TV Series Will Feature Music By Reznor & Ross

In addition to confirming the premiere date, HBO has released a handful of new images from True Detective season 3 that feature Ali with his costars Carmen Ejogo (the Fantastic Beasts movies) and Stephen Dorff (Somewhere). You can check them out in the space below.

Pizzolatto is once again the sole writer on True Detective season 3 (though he got an assist from Deadwood‘s David Milch on episode four) and further directed this season alongside Daniel Sackheim (Jack Ryan) and Jeremy Saulnier (Hold the Dark). However, even with so many of the same story elements as season 1 and equally strong acting talent, season 3 is still missing an important ingredient from the show’s first season – namely, Cary Fukunaga, who helmed all eight episodes and is generally credited for elevating the series in a high-art take on pulpy crime genre tropes.

Still, there’s a lot about True Detective season 3 that sounds promising on paper and it seems reasonable to assume that, if nothing else, this installment will be a step-up from the slow mess that was season 2. Moreover, for fans of Ali’s work in films like Moonlight (which he won his Oscar for) and his soulful performance as the villainous Cottonmouth from Netflix’s Luke Cage season 1, this new season of True Detective promises to showcase the actor’s powerful screen presence in a way that it never has been before.

MORE: Riverdale Season 3 is Similar to True Detective

True Detective season 3 premieres January 13, 2019 on HBO.

Source: HBO



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2018-10-11 01:10:23 – Sandy Schaefer

18 Best Sequels, According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%)

We live in an age where sequels are all the rage. Every major studio is chasing those franchises that can keep their cash flow healthy for years to come. Sometimes, they’re exhausting. Other times, they can be our most anticipated movies. Maybe we could do without more Transformers movies, but Marvel and Mission: Impossible sequels are event movies that drive us to the theater in droves.

Sequels are tricky and unpredictable, though. On one hand, they’re often necessary for expanding stories and the good ones continue sagas we want to see progress. On the other, some are soulless cash grabs that shouldn’t exist. In the worst cases, some of them completely derail promising franchises by failing to deliver the goods. Then again, in some instances, sequels can get a series back up and running after they’ve experienced setbacks.

This list will look at those rare sequels that are considered worthy — and even superior — follow-ups. Those rare beasts that make us grateful for multiple movies in a series. Furthermore, we’ll also be discussing the most maligned sequels that brought no critical good will to their respective franchises whatsoever. It’s more fun this way. In order to fully appreciate the best of the best, we also must acknowledge the worst of the worst. Without evil, we wouldn’t be able to understand all that’s good and pure. Without terrible movies, we wouldn’t be grateful for the good ones.

With this in mind, here are 18 Best Sequels According To Rotten Tomatoes (And 8 Stuck With 0%).

26 Best: Captain America: Civil War (91%)

The decision to keep the same team of writers for all three Captain America films paid off in the end. The trilogy just went from strength to strength with each passing entry, though some would argue that The Winter Soldier is equally as good — if not better — than Civil War. Either way, they’re both prime examples of how to do sequels right.

Civil War tackles the same themes you’d expect from a movie about a do-gooder like Cap, but where the film truly soars is during its wild third act. The airport showdown is the best action showdown in the MCU, and that’s saying something.

25 Worst: The Bad News Bears Go To Japan (0%)

If you didn’t know that sequels to The Bad News Bears exist then no one would think any less of you. While the first movie is a cult classic about an underdog baseball team, the sequels have faded from the collective memory with the passing of time, lost like tears in the rain. That’s for good reason.

None of the sequels are good, but The Bad News Bears Go To Japan is especially bad.

While the idea to relocate to Japan for a big game is good on paper, the sequel is just bland, forgettable, and was made to cash in on the brand name.

24 Best: Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens (93%)

Some fans argue that The Force Awakens is essentially a retread of A New Hope in many ways. However, clearly the critics and audiences didn’t necessarily agree, given its stellar Rotten Tomatoes score and its audience score of 87%, not to mention its impressive box office haul.

As far as Star Wars movies go, it hits the spot. The new characters are great, the return of some old faces is a trip down memory lane, and the story still made significant effort to push the franchise forward. In those regards, the film definitely succeeded.

23 Best: War for the Planet of the Apes (93%)

Anyone who has a problem with classics being rebooted needs to watch the most recent Planet of the Apes trilogy.  The finale pits the apes in a brutal battle against the humans, which leads to an epic confrontation between the Caesar the Ape and humanity’s ruthless colonel (played by an utterly wicked Woody Harrelson). As far as concluding trilogies goes, War for the Planet of the Apes has everything.

By no means is this a pleasant movie, but it is rewarding. And not only does it wrap up an epic story, but the film boasts some of the great CGI wizardry out there. The action is also ridiculously impressive and compelling, which is crazy considering it’s a movie about people versus monkeys.

22 Best: Logan (93%)

James Mangold’s Logan, the gloriously violent and heartbreaking farewell to Patrick Stewart’s Professor X and Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine, is an all-timer. Taking cues from the Old Man Logan comics, the movie has just as much in common with neo-westerns as it does with superhero yarns, which makes for a gritty, character-driven elegy to characters many of us grew up with.

Logan deserves praise for going R-rated and taking some stylistic risks.

The movie is proof that audiences will still flock to see superhero movies with some edge. If you’re going to send off some icons, this is the way to do it.

21 Worst: Return to the Blue Lagoon (0%)

Considering that no one liked The Blue Lagoon (it currently holds a 9% rating on RT), why anyone would want to return to the franchise is beyond comprehension. Of course, every sequel is a perfect opportunity to right some old wrongs if handled with care. Unfortunately, this was not. The story follows two children who are marooned on a tropical island as the grow up and fall in love, etc. The characters don’t wear enough clothes either, which makes for some weird, uncomfortable viewing.

There are some unintentional laughs to be had at the poor script and performances.

Otherwise the Blue Lagoon isn’t a scenic cinematic paradise worth spending time in unless you want to punish yourself for some reason.

20 Best: The Dark Knight (94%)

Few superhero movies are ever regarded as anything more than popcorn fare. However, if there were ever a superhero movie that proved the genre could be prestige cinema, it would be The Dark Knight. Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman is an exploration of chaos and just how far people are willing to go to achieve their goal.

The Dark Knight — for better or worse when you consider how devoid of fun some DC movies have been since — also brought a gritty, realistic touch to the genre. The movie feels more like a Michael Mann crime saga than it does a story about superheroes versus their outlandishly evil counterparts.

19 Best: Finding Dory (94%)

In recent times, Pixar has been criticized for relying too heavily on sequels, but if it ain’t broke… Finding Dory was released 13 years after Finding Nemo, and it was a smash with critics and audiences alike.

Its 94% on Rotten Tomatoes is complemented by an 84% audience score.

Upon release Finding Dory was praised for being as funny and thought-provoking as the first movie, while also adding a new dimension to the story. As with any Pixar movie, Finding Dory can be appreciated by audiences of all ages. 

18 Worst: Staying Alive (0%)

No other actor on the planet has experienced a career of ups and downs like John Travolta has. When he broke out he had the world at his dancing feet. After that, his career experienced a downturn until it was resurrected briefly following Pulp Fiction until it ultimately plummeted when he started starring in movies like Battlefield Earth. Staying Alive was released in 1983 when Travolta was experiencing his first fall from grace. Following up a classic like Saturday Night Fever was never going to be easy, but it shouldn’t have been this difficult, either.

The sequel lacks the gritty realism of its predecessor, and instead tries to get by on dance sequences. What’s the point in dancing when we don’t care about who’s doing it?

17 Best: Creed (95%)

No franchise tends to remain compelling seven sequels in, but Creed is proof that the Rocky franchise is the rare exception. Granted, some Rocky movies aren’t exactly knockouts, but Creed got things back on track and showed that it’s game for a few more rounds.

By serving as both a sequel and a spin-off/soft reboot, Creed gave the franchise a breath of new life.

It passed the gloves on to Michael B. Jordan as the eponymous character.  Creed 2 is right around the corner. Let’s see if it can do what the original saga failed to do and deliver a second outing that’s as good as the inaugural entry.

16 Worst: Leprechaun 2 (0%)

The first Leprechaun movie doesn’t come close to being certified fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, so it should come as no surprise that the sequels didn’t receive any critical acclaim. Especially not the second movie, which no critic seemed to enjoy at all.

Here, the infamous critter resurfaces in Los Angeles to find a bride, which leads to him abducting a young woman and trying to claim her as his own. This isn’t high art by any means, nor does it try to be.

15 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (96%)

The Harry Potter books were an emotional roller coaster that affected millions of readers worldwide. Reliving those adventures on the big screen was also a great time to be alive, and the grand finale lived up to expectations. In the final installment of the saga about the Boy Who Lived and his fight against the forces of darkness, the ultimate showdown finally happens as our hero and his pals face off against Voldemort in Hogwarts castle.

It’s a true epic in every sense of the word.

As far as wrapping up the story goes, Death Hallows: Part 2 delivered the goods and gave us cinematic closure in style.

14 Worst: Looking Who’s Talking Now (0%)

Look Who’s Talking is a perfectly serviceable comedy that should never have received any sequels. In a bid to end to the trilogy on a high following the disappointing previous sequel, Look Who’s Talking Too, someone thought it would be a good idea to introduce talking dogs to the mix for the series’ swan song. 

Needless to say, Look Who’s Talking Now wasn’t the glorious goodbye the series was looking for, but at least the film did cast some cute dogs.

13 Best: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (97%)

The third installment of Sergio Leone’s influential Dollars trilogy, The Good, The Bad and the Ugly is the creme de la creme of spaghetti westerns. 

The story centers around two men who form an uneasy alliance following a scam.

This leads them on a quest as it turns out there’s money buried in the desert and they want to find it. However, they have to compete against another who won’t hesitate to put a bullet in them to claim the prize. On top of being one of the most acclaimed movies out there, the film has been hailed as a major influence on directors like Quentin Tarantino.

12 Best: The Godfather: Part II (97%)

The continuation of Francis Ford Coppola’s Best Picture-winning 1972 crime saga, The Godfather: Part II chronicles Michael Corleone’s further ascendency in organized crime while simultaneously taking us back to the past to explore his dad’s humble beginnings.

Like its predecessor, the sequel also won Best Picture and is hailed by many a critic and film buff as one of the best movies ever made. Whether it’s better than the original is up for debate, but they’re like two sides of the same coin. These movies set the bar for mob pictures, and to this day, other directors are still trying to recreate the formula.

11 Mad Max: Fury Road (97%)

Director George Miller was in his seventies when he unleashed Mad Max: Fury Road, but the energy and madness imbued in every frame of this extravaganza suggest a man half his age.

Maybe we’ll never see another Mad Max movie, but the world needs a Furiosa spin-off eventually.

Fury Road is essentially one non-stop chase that barely lets up from the get-go all the way to the climactic ending. Furthermore, it’s a movie that defied expectation by taking the focus away from the titular character and making Charlize Theron’s Furiosa the real hero of the adventure. 

10 Worst: Jaws: The Revenge (0%)

Is Jaws: the Revenge a good movie? Definitely not. Is it an entertaining movie, though? Definitely yes.

How many other movies have sharks that make a conscious decision to get revenge on the humans that wronged them? Not only that, but the shark here followed its target to the Bahamas from Massachusetts. And why would someone who wants to avoid sharks go to an island surrounded by ocean? The movie is illogical, silly, nonsense, but it does offer sheer entertainment value for bad movie buffs.

9 Best: Aliens (98%)

Alien and Aliens are quite different in some regards, but they complement each other perfectly. The first is an exercise in pure suspense and terror. The sequel, on the other hand, retains the horror elements but adds a lot more action to proceedings.

Aliens shows how to make a successful sequel: acknowledge what came before but don’t be afraid to bring some fresh ideas to the table.

James Cameron was on fire in the ’80s and he wasn’t afraid to make Ridley Scott’s baby his own.

8 Best: Mad Max 2: Road Warrior (98%)

While George Miller’s inaugural Mad Max caper is a cult classic, most film buffs would agree that a couple of the sequels are slightly superior. Taking nothing away from the first movie, Road Warrior is a vast improvement when it comes to world building and sheer action spectacle. The story follows the eponymous character as he helps a group of people steal oil from a tyrannical madman and his band of goons.

As far as cinematic thrill rides go, few movies are on par with Road Warrior. Here, Miller turned up the volume significantly by making the post-apocalyptic terrains feel more dangerous and the action sequences more gung-ho and grander in scale.

7 Best: Evil Dead 2 (98%)

Sam Raimi’s first Evil Dead movie was a huge achievement for independent filmmaking when it was released back in 1981. The movie still holds up to this day with its innovative camera work, effective scares, and excellent cast as well.

The sequel is a triumph in its own right.

While the first movie contained moments of dark comedy, the sequel amps up the zaniness to become what is essentially the splatter flick equivalent of a Laurel and Hardy flick. For 90 minutes, Bruce Campbell is tormented by laughing ornaments and his own severed hand. As silly as that sounds, Evil Dead 2 still manages to pack more punch than your average MMA fighter.

6 Worst: Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol (0%)

In the third installment of the Police Academy franchise, the cops are understaffed and in need of some help. Naturally, the force turns to America’s civilians to help aid in their mission. Things don’t go smoothly, for the characters in the film and the movie itself.

Rotten Tomatoes describes Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol as “Utterly, completely, thoroughly and astonishingly unfunny” and  a movie which sent “a once-innocuous franchise plummeting to agonizing new depths.” That sounds about right.

5 Toy Story 3 (99%)

Few franchises manage to strike three home runs in a row. Even The Godfather stuttered when it came to the third outing. Toy Story, on the other hand, never ceases to replicate the magic time and time again.

This emotional installment sees Andy get ready to leave for college and neglect his old toys.

He’s all grown up and has no use for them anymore, and what ensues is what is by far the most heartfelt movie in the series.

4 Worst: Highlander II: The Quickening (0%)

As far as pure entertaining action-fantasy goes, the first Highlander movie is a fun slice of popcorn entertainment that aficionados of cult cinema lose their head over. The sequel, meanwhile, is an incomprehensible mess.

Highlander II is too overplotted to explain, but the cusp of the story revolves around the hero from the first movie taking on a corporation after being led to believe that they don’t have the world’s best interests in mind. In this one, our hero is a defender of the ozone as well. What makes Highlander II so awful is that it completely retcons everything good about the original film and the mythology it introduced.

3 Best: The Bride of Frankenstein (100%)

We all desire to be loved by someone special– even bolt-head monsters made up of the remains of other people. But to find them a mate, one must dig up some more corpses and create a suitable partner that’s similar in genetic make-up. This is also the storyline behind James Whale’s 1935 masterpiece, Bride of Frankenstein.

There are too many Frankenstein movies to keep track of at this point, but this sequel remains the pinnacle of the original series.

The movie is a masterpiece that successfully blends campy fun with Gothic beauty and genuine chills that’s stood the test of time as a result.

2 Paddington 2 (100%)

No one expected the the first Paddington to be as good as it is. That movie is a bona fide classic in the making in its own right, but the sequel is some next-next level brilliance.

Paddington 2 sees the lovable bear go to prison and, unsurprisingly, all the mean criminals fall in love with him as well. Critics, like the fictional convicts, were also full of praise for the titular bear and his second big onscreen adventure as well. At one point, Paddington 2 was even the best reviewed movie in history.

1 Best: Toy Story 2 (100%)

Following up a movie like Toy Story was never going to be easy, but that didn’t stop Pixar from trying and succeeding. In this one, we find out that Woody is a collectible when he’s discovered and stolen by a greedy museum owner. Naturally this prompts Buzz Lightyear, Mr. Potato, and the rest of the gang into action and they set out to save their friend.

General consensus on Rotten Tomatoes states that Toy Story 2 is that rare sequel that improves upon its predecessor.

The sequel raises the stakes and ups the element of adventure while retaining the humor and heart that made audiences fall in love with the franchise in the first place.

What’s your favorite sequel? Let us know in the comments!



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2018-10-10 04:10:39 – Kieran Fisher

22 July Review: Paul Greengrass Delivers Another Intense Docudrama

Despite some general storytelling issues, Greengrass succeeds in delivering another well-crafted and intelligent docudrama-thriller with 22 July.

In-between his efforts on the Bourne movies, journalist-turned filmmaker Paul Greengrass has spent much of his career making docudrama-thrillers about real-world events, ranging from the September 11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. (United 93) to the hijacking of the Maersk Alabama in 2009 (Captain Phillips). While there’s an inherent risk of exploiting a real-world tragedy that comes with any such project, Greengrass has long been celebrated for his ability to dramatize terrible events on the big screen in a manner that’s intense, yet sensitive and ultimately insightful in its presentation. Thankfully, that remains the case with his Netflix Original 22 July, even if it doesn’t necessarily represent the writer/director at his finest. Despite some general storytelling issues, Greengrass succeeds in delivering another well-crafted and intelligent docudrama-thriller with 22 July.

22 July picks up on July 21, 2011 in Oslo, Norway, as Anders Behring Breivik (Anders Danielsen Lie) – a self-declared right wing extremist – prepares to carry out a terrorist attack on the city the next day. He begins his assault by setting off a bomb in a van near the main office of the then-current Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg (Ola G. Furuseth), killing eight people in the process. Breivik then proceeds to continue his attack by gunning down 69 members of a summer camp organized by the AUF – the youth division of the Norwegian Labour Party – on the island of Utøya, before he is ultimately apprehended by the police and taken into custody.

Among the members of the summer camp is one Viljar Hanssen (Jonas Strand Gravli), who manages to survive Breivik’s attack despite being shot multiple times and left permanently maimed. As Viljar struggles to recover both physically and psychologically from what happened to him (along with everyone else who survived the Utøya shootings and their loved ones), Breivik works with his chosen lawyer Geir Lippestad (Jon Øigarden) to mount a defense and use his trial as a platform to publicly announce his political agenda (which calls for the immediate deportation of all Muslims and heavier restrictions on immigration to Norway, among other things). When it becomes clear to Viljar what Breivik intends to do, he grows increasingly determined to continue his rehabilitation and testify against him in court for not only himself, but also every other person whose lives were affected by what took place on July 22.

Adapted from the book One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway — and Its Aftermath by Åsne Seierstad, Greengrass’ script for 22 July has a very clear-cut three act structure – with the first act focused on the July 22 attack, the second part set during its immediate aftermath, and the final third centered on Breivik’s trial. The film is strongest during its first and third acts in particular, as those chapters (respectively) play to Greengrass’ strengths as a suspense-thriller storyteller and provide the emotional payoff to Viljar and, thus, Norway’s overarching journey of recovery and survival. It’s the second act where things start to drag and get a little muddled, especially as 22 July splits its focus between not only Viljar’s story thread, but also Lippestad and Breivik’s trial preparation, and the investigation into Stoltenberg’s administration and its failure to prevent a terrorist attack. While there’s nothing in the second act that feels inessential, 22 July struggles to divide its attention evenly between its three plotlines and the film’s pacing suffers for it.

On the whole, however, 22 July does a nice job covering a fair amount of narrative ground, even when taking its pretty substantial runtime into consideration. It helps that Greengrass (as he’s known now for doing, as a director) never fully lifts his foot off the gas pedal and keeps the film’s proceedings feeling on-edge throughout, even during its more purely dramatic portions. The filmmaker, working this time around with DP Pål Ulvik Rokseth (The Snowman) and Oscar-winning Argo editor William Goldenberg, uses essentially the same vérité cinematography and restless editing style that he has on his previous movies, in order to fully immerse viewers in the film’s setting and action. At the same time, Greengrass slows things down a bit here and, in turn, delivers a movie that’s more visually cohesive than some of his weaker efforts in the past (see the last Bourne sequel, in particular). This serves 22 July well, allowing it to effectively work as both a grounded drama and thriller.

Given the sheer amount of information that 22 July strives to cover, though, there’s not a lot of room for the film’s actors to really shine – not in the way that Barkhad Abdi and Tom Hanks did in Captain Phillips, for example. Even so, the 22 July cast is uniformly strong across the board, with Gravli especially doing an excellent job of portraying Viljar’s struggles with his physical injuries, PTSD, and the sheer amount of emotional baggage that he’s saddled with after barely managing to escape the attack on Utøya with his own life. Actors like Thorbjørn Harr and Isak Bakli Aglen are similarly moving in their smaller roles as members of Viljar’s family, as is Seda Witt as Lara Rashid, a young woman who starts to make a romantic connection with Viljar before both of their lives are shattered by Breivik’s attack. As for Breivik himself: Lie is quite compelling in the role and portrays the terrorist as a fully-developed person – one whose rationalization of his behavior makes him chilling and pathetic in equal measure.

As with his previous films, Greengrass uses 22 July as a means for delivering larger sociopolitical commentary about the state of things in the world, specifically where it concerns the rise of xenophobic and nationalist ideologies in various countries (the U.S. included). While his scripted dialogue can start to become a bit on the nose as its strives to get these points across (especially in the third act), Greengrass largely succeeds in allowing the story here to shine a light on these issues organically, without getting up on his figurative soapbox to drive the point home. If there’s a downside to the filmmaker’s approach, though, it’s that July 22 winds up handling its subject matter in a way that’s more engaging intellectually than emotionally and, thus, lacks the emotional resonance of Greengrass’ best work to date.

All things considered, however, Greengrass does a very good job of bringing the true story behind 22 July to cinematic life. The final result is a film that makes for an enlightening and otherwise respectful documentation of a horrifying real-world event, rather than one that comes off as exploitative or manipulative. 22 July is showing in select theaters now – in order to qualify for next year’s major film awards shows – and it certainly benefits from being seen on the big screen, but can still be appreciated just as much as a Netflix Original on your home TV. While it’s obviously not a light-hearted viewing experience, 22 July is very much worth checking out if you’ve enjoyed Greengrass’ previous non-Bourne efforts and/or would like to know more about Norway’s own infamous modern terrorist attack.

TRAILER

22 July is now available for streaming on Netflix and is playing in select U.S. theaters. It is 143 minutes long and is rated R for disturbing violence, graphic images, and language.

Let us know what you thought of the film in the comments section!



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2018-10-10 01:10:22 – Sandy Schaefer

Stan Lee Addresses Elder Abuse Allegations Against His Daughter

Stan Lee has broken his silence regarding the allegations of elder abuse against his daughter that were made earlier this year. Though questions regarding the Marvel creator’s estate have circled for years, it wasn’t until an April report that that concern became public knowledge. Following the death of his wife, Joanie, in 2017, his only remaining immediate family is his daughter, J.C., who, along with former business manager Keya Morgan, former publicist Jerry Olivarez, and former road manager Max Anderson, were named in the report for taking advantage of Lee in his old age.

Not long after, Lee denied the claims against Morgan, calling them “hateful and harmful” and “totally based on slander.” However, things shifted, and, in the months that followed, Morgan was arrested for filing a false police report. Furthermore, Lee was granted a restraining order against Morgan. In addition to the accusations of fraud, abuse, and embezzlement against Morgan, the ex-business manager is also responsible for accusing J.C. of physically assaulting her father.

Related: Stan Lee Elder Abuse Concerns: A Timeline

When asked whether he was aware of the allegations made against J.C. – including potential future stories in the works – Lee joked to The Daily Beast, “I wish that everyone would be as abusive to me as JC.” He then changed his tone, responding seriously that she is “wonderful” and, though they have “occasional spats, that there’s nothing to the allegations.

J.C.’s lawyer, Kirk Schenck, further describes their relationship, describing it as “Kennedyesque.” He props her up, describing her as “the avenger…the person who protects that man.” J.C. vehemently denies any physical violence, but does recognize that she has raised her voice at him, blaming it mostly on the situation involving who she describes as “horrible people” who want to “divide and conquer.” She also insinuates that Morgan and possibly Anderson were involved with Scientology.

For Lee, the interview seemed to confuse him at times. He states that J.C. has been friends with Kirk for “30, 40 years,” but she maintains it’s only been a few years. On the tape in which Lee defended Morgan, he pointed fingers at Schenck, saying that he was responsible for supplying her with drugs. In response to being asked about this, Lee replied that he “must have been talking about someone else.” 

In addition to the heavy issues addressed in the interview, Lee has the opportunity to comment on a preferred subject: the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Lee states that his favorite superhero adaptation is Spider-Man, and comments on the increased diversity of the changing times, calling himself “Mr. Reboot” and noting that he wants to represent everyone, jokingly including “green people” (in a nod to Hulk). And, though he will no longer be making public appearances at conventions, Lee did express how much he misses the writing side of his former job. Hopefully, as long as he is able, his current support system will allow him to continue to be creative in whatever ways he can.

More: Fan Art Recasts Marvel Legend Stan Lee as the MCU’s Odin

Source: The Daily Beast



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2018-10-08 05:10:10 – Becca Bleznak

New Police Academy Movie Is Coming, Says Steve Guttenberg



Actor Steve Guttenberg has taken to social media to reveal that Police Academy may soon return. The Policy Academy franchise got its start with Hugh Wilson’s movie in 1984, starring Guttenberg, Kim Cattral, and G.W. Bailey, among others. It became an unexpected box office phenomenon, thus leading to numerous sequels in the 1980s and 1990s.

There have been rumors about an eighth Police Academy film since the early 2000s, when series creator Paul Maslansky began work on a script. Unfortunately the project was shelved in 2006, and it wound up stuck in development hell for over a decade. The last update was back in 2012, when Jeremy Garelick was hired to rewrite the script. Thankfully, it seems like it hasn’t been forgotten – yet.

Related: Movie Franchises AT&T Gets With The Time Warner Acquisition

Responding to a fan question on Twitter, franchise star Steve Guttenberg – who played the hapless Sergeant Mahoney – has confirmed that Police Academy 8 is still in the works. “The next Police Academy movie is coming,” he wrote. “No details yet, but it is in a gift bag being readied!” No doubt AT&T is eager to develop some of the long-forgotten franchises they gained with their purchase of Warner Bros.

The Police Academy films all follow the same basic concept; a struggling police department opens its doors to accept all recruits. Guttenberg played the franchise star, Sergeant Mahoney, the most well-balanced of all the cadets, whose father was a decorated police officer. Other recurring characters include Michael Winslow’s Jones, best known for his bizarre and entertaining impressions and sound effects; Tim Kazurinsky’s Sweetchuck, a nerd who learned to stand up for himself; Bobcat Goldthwait’s Zed, a surreal gang leader who became Sweetchuck’s roommate during training; and, of course, G.W. Bailey’s Harris, the scheming police officer who was constantly attempting to undermine the Police Academy.

Sadly, a number of key actors have passed away since 1994’s Police Academy: Mission to Moscow. That includes George Gaynes, who portrayed Commandant Lassard, head of the Police Academy. One of the most hilarious characters in the entire franchise, Lassard was known for his many quirks and foibles, including his love of traveling by golf cart. Lassard’s finest hour was in Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach, when he was honored as Police Officer of the Decade – and unwittingly foiled a jewel heist when he picked up the wrong bag at the airport. It’s frankly hard to imagine a Police Academy movie without Gaynes, whose comedic timing was the basis of many of the films’ best gags.

If another Police Academy is to work, it will need to reinvent itself for the twenty-first century. Hopefully, Guttenberg won’t be the only member of the classic cast to sign up to the long-awaited sequel. But, at the same time, the franchise will need a lot of new blood, based on more modern tropes and ideas.

More: 15 ‘80s Comedies That Are Way More Offensive Than You Remember

Source: Steve Guttenberg





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MP Hema Malini requests new Commissioner of Police in Mumbai to make Juhu clunkers free


MP Hema Malini requests new Commissioner of Police in Mumbai to make Juhu clunkers free

Although Hema Malini is not able to dedicate much time to the Indian entertainment industry, the actress is enjoying her family time and of course, not to forget a successful political career. Recently, a request from the actress turned politician has helped the residents of plush locality of Juhu in suburban Mumbai. Hema showcased her support to Operation Khataara in a unique way by contacting the police commissioner.

MP Hema Malini requests new Commissioner of Police in Mumbai to make Juhu clunkers free

Upset with the way footpaths and roads are filled with khataaras [junk] caused by abandoned vehicles and clunkers, Hema Malini contacted the police. The new Commissioner of Police Subodh Jaiswal not only heeded her advice but also immediately put his plan into action by ordering the police force to clear out all the junk from the Juhu area.

From what we hear, the footpaths and the roads in Vaikunthlal Mehta Road aka VM Road were filled with as many as 50 ‘khataara’ vehicles. Another 14 of them were towed away near Juhu police station too. Describing them as an eyesore, Hema spoke about it in recent media reports where she also confirmed that she had indeed put in a request to police commissioner Jaiswal and now the same has been towed away. The MP also stated that she had met the commissioner at her residence recently where she discussed these problems and now action has been taken against it. She also asserted that she has been seeing this junk for years together and it is indeed a great sight now, since it has been removed.

Senior police inspector PS Wahval of Juhu police station also threw some light on how pedestrians have been facing difficulties because of the overcrowded footpath that is filled with abandoned clunkers.  Speaking about the same was also the local corporator Renu Hansraj who has now requested the need for a spacious junkyard for these vehicles since the existing ones are already full. She also further elaborated on her plan of giving a facelift to the areas in Juhu by beautifying it with graffiti and also planting more trees in the locality.

Also Read : “Atalji contributed a lot to my film Kranti,” Hema Malini on Atal Bihari Vajpayee



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