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Chris Hemsworth Vandalizes Avengers Posters On Endgame Press Tour

During the current press tour for Avengers: Endgame, Chris Hemsworth took the time to hilariously vandalize the posters of a few co-stars. The cast is ramping up their public appearances ahead of the highly-anticipated film, which premieres later this month. Avengers: Endgame will close out a chapter of the Marvel Cinematic Universe that has been a decade in the making.

Hemsworth will reprise his role as Thor for the movie that follows the fallout from Thanos’ deadly snap. With half of the population gone, Thor and the rest of the Avengers will team up with a few newer faces to take down the Mad Titan, while also figuring out a way to get their loved ones back. Whether that includes time travel through the Quantum Realm or some other option, the Avengers have vowed in the trailer to do “whatever it takes.”

Related: Every Record Avengers: Endgame Has Already Broken

While Marvel continues to highlight those who have fallen due to the “Decimation,” publicity ahead of Avengers: Endgame’s release continues to be grim. During the recent press conference, many chairs were purposely left empty for main characters that were killed in Avengers: Infinity War. That didn’t stop Hemsworth from having some laughs during the press tour. Hemsworth took to Instagram to show off the fun he had with the posters of his fellow co-stars.

In the short video, Hemsworth can be seen vandalizing Avengers: Endgame posters displayed along a hallway. First, he adds a goatee and mustache to Paul Rudd’s Ant-Man poster before showing the changes he made to Captain America’s brooding look. Hemsworth then adds a little “I Heart Thor” note to Robert Downey Jr.’s poster. He eventually adds luscious eyelashes to Jeremy Renner, but not before passing Gwenyth Paltrow’s poster, claiming she’s already “too pretty,” so she doesn’t need any alters.

Hemworth has been chronicling his time on the Avengers: Endgame press tour in recent days. He has taken to social media to share pictures of himself goofing off with co-stars. Hemsworth was also in attendance when some of the cast surprised kids at a Disneyland charity event. The Marvel star was joined by fellow cast members Robert Downey Jr., Brie Larson, Scarlett Johansson, Paul Rudd, and Jeremy Renner, as well as Disney CEO Bob Iger.

There is no word yet if Hemsworth has a future in the MCU beyond Avengers: Endgame. It seems inevitable that not all of the original Avengers will survive the impending battle against Thanos. Whether or not Hemsworth returns to reprise his role as Thor, the actor still has multiple projects in the near future. Besides appearing in the upcoming Men in Black spin-off, Men in Black: International, Hemsworth is already lined up to portray Hulk Hogan in a Netflix biopic.

Next: The Best MCU Rewatch Order For Before Avengers: Endgame

Source: Chris Hemsworth



2019-04-08 05:04:46

Kara Hedash

Avengers: Endgame Press Conference Had Empty Chairs for Fallen Heroes

Avengers: Endgame is only a few weeks away, and the stars of the film were out in force to promote the movie. However, there were a few empty chairs that were left empty during the press tour for the heroes who perished during the events of Avengers: Infinity War. 

Avengers: Infinity War turned out to have the highest body count of any MCU movie to date, as Thanos was able to complete his master plan of gathering the Infinity Stones and using their power to wipe out half of all living things in the universe. A large number of the heroes and villains of the MCU were wiped out when Thanos snapped his fingers, which meant that only a handful of characters will be left to avenge the fallen in Avengers: Endgame. The list of characters obliterated by Thanos includes Spider-Man, Black Panther, Doctor Strange, Scarlet Witch, the Winter Soldier, and Nick Fury, among others.

Related: Neil DeGrasse Tyson Reacts to THAT Thanos, Ant-Man Theory

The loss of so many members of the Avengers has not gone unrecognized by Favreau. He hosted a recent press event for Avengers: Endgame which had a few extra empty chairs laid out. The empty chairs were specifically left to honor the characters who were killed during Avengers: Infinity War. Footage from the initial press conference has been shown on Twitter, where the curtain that was separating the cast from the audience was dropped, showing several empty seats. Favreau mentioned they were empty due to how things were different in the “post-snap” Avengers: Infinity War universe.

The attendees at the press conference included Karen Gillan, Paul Rudd, Scarlett Johansson, Kevin Feige, Robert Downey Jr., Don Cheadle, Chris Hemsworth, Danai Gurira, Jeremy Renner, Anthony Russo, Chris Evans, Joe Russo, Brie Larson, and Mark Ruffalo. They dodged questions relating to story spoilers and mostly discussed the experience of working on the movie and being part of the MCU.

The chairs being left out as a memorial for the deceased Avengers: Infinity War characters is a nice touch, but the chances of those characters staying dead after Avengers: Endgame are low, especially as several of them are already involved in film projects that take place after Avengers: Endgame. The idea of the Thanos finger snap being undone in Avengers: Endgame might seem predictable to some fans (even if Robert Downey Jr. claims otherwise), but that has done little to diminish interest in the film. Avengers: Endgame is breaking sales records left and right, while outlets are struggling to provide tickets for the early showings, so the foregone conclusions are not affecting the incredible enthusiasm for the movie.

More: The Best MCU Rewatch Order For Before Avengers: Endgame

Source: Twitter



2019-04-07 05:04:27

Scott Baird

Showtime Orders Season 2 Of Jim Carrey’s Kidding

Just a few weeks after its series premiere, Showtime announces that it has renewed Kidding, the fascinating tragicomedy starring Jim Carrey. In addition to Carrey, the series also features the likes of Catherine Keener, Judy Greer, and Frank Langella as members of the Piccirillo family, ostensibly the people caught in the orbit of the national treasure that is Carrey’s Jeff Pickles, aka Mr. Pickles, the beloved children’s entertainer who happens to be going through a massive existential crisis at the moment, as he struggles with the grief over losing a child and seeing his home life disintegrate as a result. 

While that might not sound like the typical kind of comedy Carrey is known for, it does strike a chord similar to his work on Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind with acclaimed director Michel Gondry, who is an executive producer on Kidding and also directed the pilot episode. The result is a show with a lot of emotion, a dark sense of humor, and that takes place in a slightly heightened world. It all adds up to one of the more unique series on Showtime right now. 

More: The Man In The High Castle Season 3 Review: More Sci-Fi Action Refocuses The Series

Showtime announced the news today in an official press release that included a statement from Gary Levine, the network’s president of programming. Levine said: 

“KIDDING has established itself as one of the most endearing and inventive shows on television. I feel like I have been watching Mr. Pickles my whole life, and I look forward to being entranced by his unique blend of hilarity and heartbreak in season two.”

The news comes shortly after the network axed I’m Dying Up Here, the ’70s-set stand up comedy drama, on which Carrey served as an executive producer. With that series lasting only two seasons, and with the continuation of network’s long-running Shameless now in question, following the planned departures of both Emmy Rossum and Cameron Monaghan (Gotham), Showtime is in a position where a series like Kidding – i.e., one with big stars – could become a key part to the network’s future success. While it’s questionable whether or not the fates of those other two series played a role in Kidding being renewed for season 2 or not, it certainly seems as though the fascinating, melancholic series could be an important part of Showtime’s lineup for quite some time. 

Next: Titans Premiere Review: Mature Content Doesn’t Make For Mature Storytelling

Kidding continues this Sunday with ‘The Cookie’ @10pm on Showtime.



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2018-10-10 02:10:38 – Kevin Yeoman

Dwayne Johnson & Netflix Team Up For John Henry Movie

Dwayne Johnson and Netflix are teaming up on a folklore-inspired film titled John Henry and the Statesmen. This will mark the first collaboration between The Rock and the streaming giant, as well as the third project overall for Johnson and director Jake Kasdan. The latter duo previously joined creative forces on 2017’s smash box office hit Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle and will reunite to begin shooting Jumanji 3 near the end of this year.

In addition to joining lucrative properties like Jumanji and Fast & Furious, Johnson has spent the last ten years expanding his “brand” to encompass everything from movie adaptations based on a variety of IPs (ex. video games, popular toylines) to original ventures (like this summer’s Skyscraper) and even his own HBO TV series in the form of Ballers. Interestingly enough though, The Rock really stepped up his franchise-building efforts a few years ago, around the same time that Netflix started to ramp up its own original movie and TV show content production. As such, it was probably inevitable that the pair would eventually find a project that they could develop together.

Related: First Look at The Rock’s Fast & Furious Spinoff Hobbs and Shaw

Per Netflix’s press release, Johnson will star in John Henry and the Statesman as the eponymous steel-driver and lead “an ensemble cast of the most popular figures from folklore and legend from all around the world” in the film. You can check out the teaser for the movie below, along with The Rock’s comments on what the John Henry folk story means to him, personally.

John Henry is based on a pitch that Johnson and his Seven Bucks Production team developed with screenwriter Tom Wheeler, who will (naturally) further write the movie’s script. Wheeler is already in the Netflix business, as it were, and is serving as the showrunner for the company’s upcoming Frank Miller-backed TV series Cursed (an origin story for the Lady of the Lake, essentially). The writer is also far from a stranger to fairy tales and legends, having previously written the Shrek spinoff Puss in Boots – among other films with broad, crowd-pleasing appeal.

Indeed, “crowd-pleasing” is the name of the game for Johnson and there’s fair reason to believe that he will deliver the goods again with John Henry, especially if the results of his efforts on Jumanji with Kasdan are any indicator. Moreover, John Henry is another movie that (like his upcoming Kamehameha biopic The King) is something of a passion project that holds a personal meaning to Johnson, by the sound of it. Good things tend to happen when The Rock really pours his heart and soul into his productions, so that certainly bodes well for his very first Netflix movie.

And, of course, if the film is a success, then don’t be surprised if Johnson and Netflix try to turn this one into a full-blown superhero-style franchise revolving around popular folklore figures from around the world.

MORE: Dwayne Johnson Wraps Filming on Jungle Cruise

We will bring you more details on John Henry and the Statesmen as they become available.

Source: Dwayne Johnson





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2018-10-09 01:10:07 – Sandy Schaefer

All The Spider-Villain Movies Coming After Venom

Venom is the first Sony-Marvel film in a planned Spider-Man villain universe – and there’s a lot more on the way. If all goes well for Sony then Venom, in theaters this weekend, will set the ball rolling for a darker version of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Once The Walt Disney Company’s acquisition of 20th Century Fox is complete, the world of Peter Parker and friends will be the only major segment of the Marvel canon not exclusively under their control. And, although Spider-Man is already part of the MCU, Sony has high hopes for creating their own franchise that can both stand on its own two feet (albeit with the possibility of tying it into the MCU down the line). Spider-Man remains one of the most iconic characters in comic book lore, and his most infamous foes are equally as popular with audiences thanks to the cartoon series and Sam Raimi trilogy.

Related: Is Venom In The MCU? Marvel/Spider-Man Movie Rights & Shared Universes Explained

Their current plans, which are reportedly being referred to internally as Sony’s Universe of Marvel Characters, or SUMC for short, involve expanding the world of the Spidey villains into their own saga. Venom, the human-symbiote who has become one of the series’ most beloved anti-heroes, is only the starting point in these plans. Sony has a whole host of other Spider-villain movies planned. Here are the titles that are either in pre-production or are currently part of the studio’s Spider-verse strategy.

  • This Page: Sony’s Confirmed Spider-Man Villain Films
  • Page 2: Spider-Man Villain Films Sony Has In Early Development

Morbius, the Living Vampire Is The Next Spider-Man Villain Movie

In an unexpected step, Sony has confirmed that the first film to follow Venom would be one centered on Morbius, the Living Vampire, and that the lead role would be played by Jared Leto. The character was created in the 1970s when the Comics Code Authority, the industry’s censorship board, lifted its ban on depictions of vampires and the supernatural. His true identity is that of Michael Morbius, a biochemist whose experiment to cure his rare blood disorder goes awry and gifts him with vampiric abilities.

The Morbius film will be directed by Life‘s Daniel Espinosa, based on a script by Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless (writers of Gods of Egypt). on screenwriting duties. Morbius is also one of the favorite comic book characters of Avi Arad, who told Screen Rant at a Venom press junket:

We are excited about Morbius. Morbius was always one of my favorite characters. I love the story about the healer that becomes a killer, and how do you deal with it.

Audiences may get Morbius sooner than expected; Sony was last said to be eyeing a November start to production, making a 2019 release possible.

Read More: Morbius the Living Vampire: Who Is He, and What Are His Powers?

Venom 2 Is Likely Going To Happen

WARNING: Spoilers for Venom in this entry.

While we still have to wait for news of Venom’s success before sequel talk begins at Sony for real, it’s clear from the film itself that the studio is eager to establish follow-up films. In one of the two end-credit scenes, Eddie goes to San Quentin prison to interview a prisoner and comes face to face with serial killer Cletus Kasady, a.k.a. Carnage. The part is played by Woody Harrelson, who had previously worked with director Ruben Fleischer on Zombieland.

Like Eddie and Venom, Kasady becomes a host for the Carnage symbiote and proves to be far more powerful and deadly than Venom; in the comics, Carnage leads to Venom teaming up with Spider-Man to take on his uncontrollable rage. Introducing Carnage to their Spider-Man universe would be a strong way for Sony to bring Peter Parker together with Eddie Brock, or otherwise make him more of a hero in his own right.

Silver Sable & Black Cat Are Getting Individual Movies

Originally, Sony had announced plans for a Silver Sable and Black Cat team-up movie, to be titled Silver and Black and released in February 2019. Gina Prince-Bythewood, director of Love and Basketball as well as the pilot for Cloak and Dagger, was attached to helm the project. Now, the two characters will be given their own films and Prince-Bythewood is no longer directing, although she will still receive a producer credit.

Silver Sable (real name Silver Sablinova) is a mercenary and leader of the Wild Pack, a title she inherited from her father, who ran a Nazi-hunting team. Given the character’s roots as a Nazi hunter, it would be difficult for Sony to overlook this crucial part of her backstory. However, it could also open up many storytelling possibilities. Sony are hoping to bring on another female director for the project, but other than that, little else is known about production.

Felicia Hardy, the infamous cat burglar with the ability to produce bad luck in her enemies, is one of Spider-Man’s most popular adversaries as well as a collaborator and on-again, off-again romantic interest. Felicia was previously played by Felicity Jones in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, where she served as Harry Osborn’s assistant, but none of her extra-curricular activities fit into the stuffed movie. Black Cat will reportedly be a re-worked version of the Silver & Black script and Prince-Bythewood will remain a producer.

Page 2: Spider-Man Villain Films Sony Has In Early Development

Spike Lee Was Reportedly In Talks For Nightwatch

While no other films have gone as far in development, Sony has several other Spider-Man villain films in the works. Earlier this year, it was reported that Spike Lee had been in talks to direct a Nightwatch film, with a potential script from Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker, although both Sony and Lee declined to comment.

Doctor Kevin Trench watched a costumed man die while battling terrorists armed with invisibility devices. When he unmasked the dead men, he was shocked to realize that it was an older version of himself. Afraid for what this meant for his future, he stole the costume and fled to a deserted island in the hopes that, if he just never wore the suit, he could avoid his own death. In more recent comics, including She-Hulk, Trench is portrayed as a wealthy philanthropist who secretly spent most of his career as a supervillain and retconned everyone’s memories of his nefarious past.

Kraven The Hunter Has A Script From The Equalizer’s Writer

One character who’s long been eyed for a solo movie is Kraven the Hunter. A Spider-Man villain who’s been rumored for inclusion in movies for years – including the MCU side – it now looks like he could be getting a solo movie at Sony. In August, it was reported that a Kraven script was being written by The Equalizer‘s Richard Wenk, although there’s been no talk of the project since then.

Kraven is one of Spider-Man’s well-known villains, remembered best for the Kraven’s Last Hunt arc which saw him travel to New York in a bid to hunt down and kill Spider-Man, then taking over as a more brutalized version. An involving story, it’s one that would definitely lend itself well to a big screen adaptation.

Read More: Who Kraven Can Hunt In His Movie Instead Of Spider-Man

Jackpot & Silk Have Movies In Development

A couple of other movies have been reported recently. First there’s Jackpot, a more recent addition to the Spider-verse, created by Dan Slott and Phil Jimenez, who only got her own mini-series in 2010. The character also has two aliases: Sara Ehret, a scientist who accidentally gives herself superhuman strength; and Alana Jacobson, who uses performance-enhancing drugs like Mutant Growth Hormone to mimic Jackpot’s powers. A Jackpot movie could open new ground for Sony and the superhero genre: Sara is a 40-something woman with a daughter while Alana is a lesbian, which could bring some much-needed diversity to the field.

There’s also Korean-American superhero Cindy Moon, a.k.a. Silk. Cindy first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #1 in April 2014. Her own powers, similar to Spider-Man’s, manifested when the same radioactive spider bit her after biting Peter Parker. Unlike Peter, Silk has the ability to create organic webbing, something she has trouble controlling. She is later approached by businessman Ezekiel Sims, who offers to guide her in her newfound abilities. Cindy briefly appears in Spider-Man: Homecoming as a classmate of Peters and is portrayed by Tiffany Espensen, although the in-development Silk movie is more likely to recast.

Next: Sony’s Marvel Universe May Already Have A Spider-Man Replacement



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2018-10-08 03:10:27 – Kayleigh Donaldson

30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles

Landing a part in the latest major superhero movie release represents the pinnacle of many an acting career. Michael Keaton, Hugh Jackman, Chris Evans and, to some extent, Robert Downey Jr might not be the household names they are today were it not for their comic book exploits.

However, while headlining the latest cinematic effort involving a caped crusader of some kind represents a dream come true for many, it’s proven to be something of a nightmare for a rare few. Bad scripts, difficult directors and a toxic work environment are just some of the many myriad reasons cited by the actors and actresses in this list – yet that’s really only the tip of the iceberg. Studio politics, stalled contract negotiations or issues around costume, make-up and iffy computer effects have also played a role in making these superhero movies not-so-super for the stars involved.

More often than not, the resulting movie has been forgettable at best and downright terrible at worst – but there are exceptions to the rule. Sometimes, an actor ended up enduring a miserable time on an otherwise enjoyable project. Other times, far sinister things were going on, unbeknownst to many involved in the finished movie.

Plenty of flops feature on this countdown but some major moneymakers can be found too, with comic book movie properties tied to Marvel, 2000AD, DC and Titan Comics all present and not very correct. Yes, landing a part in the latest superhero movie blockbuster has represented the pinnacle of many an acting career down the years but for this lot, it represented the pits.

Here are 30 Actors Who Regretted Superhero Roles.

30 Hugo Weaving – Red Skull

Hugo Weaving originally signed a multi-picture deal to play the Red Skull across various future Captain America movies. However, when the character returned in Avengers: Infinity War the character had been recast with The Walking Dead’s Ross Marquand taking Weaving’s place. It wasn’t a huge shock.

A few years prior, The Matrix actor told Collider playing the Red Skull was “not something I would want to do again.”

“It’s not the sort of film I seek out and really am excited by,” he said. “I increasingly like to go back to what I used to always do, which is to get involved with projects that I really have a personal affiliation with.”

29 Ryan Reynolds – Green Lantern

Ryan Reynolds has made no secret of the fact things didn’t exactly go to plan with 2011’s Green Lantern. He even went as far as to include a gag, poking fun at the project, in Deadpool 2. Though it’s something he is able to laugh about now, it’s clear the actor regrets signing on that particular dotted line.

“When we shot Green Lantern, nobody auditioning for the role of Green Lantern was given the opportunity to read the script because the script didn’t exist,” Reynolds told The Hollywood Reporter. The experience did at least teach him some valuable lessons about making superhero movies which was good news for Deadpool fans.

28 Jessica Alba – Invisible Woman

Jessica Alba’s experience playing Sue Storm in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer was so bad it left her considering a career change. “I wanted to stop acting. I hated it. I really hated it,” Alba told Elle [via SyFy].

“I remember when I was dying in ‘Silver Surfer’. The director [Tim Story] was like, ‘It looks too real. It looks too painful. Can you be prettier when you cry? Cry pretty, Jessica.’ He was like, ‘Don’t do that thing with your face. Just make it flat. We can CGI the tears in.'” She continued: “It all got me thinking: Am I not good enough?”

27 Ben Affleck – Daredevil

Ben Affleck doesn’t just regret starring in the 2003 movie adaptation of Daredevil, he hates it. Affleck let his feelings be known to TimeTalks [via NME] during a discussion about why he signed on for Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice. Affleck said: “Part of it was I wanted for once to get one of these movies and do it right – to do a good version. I hate Daredevil so much.”

“The Netflix show does really cool stuff,” he added.

“I feel like that was there for us to do with that character, and we never kind of got it right. I wanted to do one of those movies and sort of get it right,” Affleck stated.

26 Terrence Howard – War Machine

Terrence Howard has always blamed Robert Downey Jr for the fact he never got to reprise the role of James Rhodes in the Iron Man sequels. “It turns out that the person that I helped become Iron Man, when it was time to re-up for the second one, took the money that was supposed to go to me and pushed me out,” Howard told Watch What Happens Live [via Vulture].

Howard claims the studio offered to pay him “one-eighth of what we contractually had” and when he tried to call Downey Jr to talk about it “he didn’t call me back for three months.”

25 Idris Elba – Heimdall

Idris Elba’s experience working on Thor: The Dark World was so bad the actor described parts of it as “torture” to The Telegraph. In the interview, Elba recalled how he was forced to complete reshoots in London for the Thor sequel just days after return from filming the prestige biopic Mandela, in South Africa.

“In between takes I was stuck there [hanging from a harness], fake hair stuck on to my head with glue, this fucking helmet, while they reset, he said. “And I’m thinking: ‘24 hours ago, I was Mandela.’ … Then there I was, in this stupid harness, with this wig and this sword and these contact lenses. It ripped my heart out.”

24 Ryan Reynolds – Wolverine: X-Men Origins

Ryan Reynolds’ appearance as Deadpool in Wolverine: X-Men Origins was plagued with problems, starting with the character’s appearance. “He wound up being this abomination of Deadpool that was like Barakapool, with his mouth sewn shut and weird blades that came out of his hands and these strange tattoos and stuff like that,” he told GQ.

Though Reynolds objected, the studio pressed on.

“The conversation at the time was ‘If you want to play Deadpool, this is your chance to introduce him. And if you don’t want to introduce him in this fashion, we’ll have someone else play him.'”When the film leaked online and fans reacted angrily, Reynolds response was simple: “told you so”.

23 Ed Norton – Hulk

Ed Norton clashed with producers behind the scenes on The Incredible Hulk, having only agreed to play Bruce Banner on the proviso he could have a say on the script and direction of the film. Replaced by Mark Ruffalo in the MCU, Norton couldn’t resist having a dig at the film during an appearance on Comedy Central’s Roast of Bruce Willis.

“I tried to be like you,” he told Willis [via Indiewire]. “I did a big action movie called The Incredible Hulk. You know what went wrong? I wanted a better script…I thought we should make one Marvel movie as good as the worst Christopher Nolan movie, but what the hell was I thinking.”

22 George Clooney – Batman

Joel Schumacher’s Batman & Robin may have fallen flat with critics and fans alike but it proved to be a serious career wake-up call for its star, George Clooney. “Up until that moment, I was an actor only concerned with finding work,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “After the failure of that film creatively, I understood that I needed to take control of the films I made, not just the role.”

Clooney successfully banished memories of his time as Batman with next three films: Out of Sight, Three Kings and O Brother, Where Art Thou?

21 Tommy Lee Jones – Two-Face

Tommy Lee Jones hated working on Batman Forever or, rather, he hated working with co-star Jim Carrey. “I was the star and that was the problem,” Carrey explained on Norm MacDonald Live [via THR].

The situation came to a head when Carrey ended up in the same restaurant as Jones during filming.

“I went over and I said, ‘Hey Tommy, how are you doing?’ and the blood just drained from his face,” Carrey said. “He went to hug me and he said, ‘I hate you. I really don’t like you.’ And I said, ‘What’s the problem?’ and pulled up a chair, which probably wasn’t smart. And he said, ‘I cannot sanction your buffoonery.'”

20 Topher Grace – Venom

Topher Grace never felt entirely comfortable in the role of Eddie Brock/Venom having bagged the role in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3. “I was a huge fan of the character of Venom when I was a kid when Todd McFarlane brought him into the comic,” he told Michael Rosenbaum on the Inside of You podcast [via Cinemablend]. “And I was surprised and a little bit like ‘Huh?’ when they wanted me to play it.”

Not only does Grace accept he was miscast, but he also agrees Tom Hardy is perfect for the role. “When I look at it now… [at Tom Hardy’s Venom movie] I go ‘That’s the guy.'”

19 Mickey Rourke – Ivan Vanko

Micky Rourke trashed the bigwigs over at Marvel Studios for what they did to his character Ivan Vanko, in Iron Man 2. Rourke told Syfy that he had worked hard with writer Justin Theroux and director Jon Favreau to flesh out his Russian villain and turn him into a three-dimensional character. Someone behind-the-scenes had other ideas though.

“I wanted to bring some other layers and colors, not just make this Russian a complete murderous revenging bad guy,” he said. “Unfortunately, the [people] at Marvel just wanted a one-dimensional bad guy, so most of the performance ended up the floor.”

18 Alicia Silverstone – Batgirl

Alicia Silverstone was on the receiving end of some serious body shaming while working on Batman & Robin. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Silverstone, who was a huge star following the success of Clueless, was under intense scrutiny over her weight with one critic reportedly observing she “looked more Babe than babe.”

When rumor got out on set that she was having issues with her costume fittings, a storyboard artist ever put together a joke cartoon of Batgirl, mocking Silverstone’s issues.

The fake poster for Clueless 2: The Casting of Batgirl might have gone down well with the guys in the film’s art department but studio bosses were far from impressed.

17 Nicolas Cage – Ghost Rider

Nicolas Cage has previously spoken of his disappointment at his two Ghost Rider movies, which he felt played it too safe. Speaking to JoBlo [via Bloody Disgusting], Cage explained that he and writer David S. Goyer had always envisioned the films as being gritty and, most importantly, R-rated.

“Ghost Rider was a movie that always should’ve been an R-rated movie,” Cage said. “David Goyer had a brilliant script which I wanted to do with David, and for whatever reason, they just didn’t let us make the movie.” Though he believes there is the potential for someone else to take on the role and go down that dark path, Cage is done with the character.

16 Jim Carrey – Colonel Stars And Stripes

Jim Carrey stunned social media ahead of the release of Kick-Ass 2 by denouncing the film and its “level of violence” in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre. Carrey, who is an outspoken advocate for increased gun control, took to Twitter following the incident to explain that he could no longer support the film.

“I did Kick-Ass 2 a month b4 Sandy Hook and now in all good conscience I cannot support that level of violence,” he wrote [via The Guardian]. “My apologies to others involve[d] with the film. I am not ashamed of it but recent events have caused a change in my heart.”

15 Michael Jai White – Spawn

He may have been among the first African American actors to portray a major comic book superhero but Michael Jai White has little love for his sole outing as Spawn. In fact, White is a much bigger fan of his small but powerful role as the gangster Gambol in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

He even went as far as to conduct an interview with The Hollywood Reporter revisiting his performance alongside Heath Ledger.

During the interview, White couldn’t resist having a dig at Spawn: “There is no footage of me ever saying that I liked Spawn. I have never said that I thought that was a good movie.” Ouch.

14 Jared Leto – The Joker

Jared Leto was left far from happy with the version of Suicide Squad that made it to the cinemas. Asked by IGN whether any scenes involving the Joker were cut from the film, Leto let rip.

“There were so many scenes that got cut from the movie, I couldn’t even start. I think that the Joker… we did a lot of experimentation on the set, we explored a lot. There’s so much that we shot that’s not in the film,” he said. “If I die anytime soon, it’s probably likely that it’ll surface somewhere. That’s the good news about the death of an actor is all that stuff seems to come out.”

13 Halle Berry – Catwoman

Halle Berry’s regret at signing up for Catwoman was clear to see when she decided to make an appearance at the annual Razzie Awards back in 2005. A celebration of the year’s worst films and performances, Berry ‘won’ the Worst Actress gong for her efforts in Catwoman and, in a surprising turn of events, was on hand to deliver a memorable acceptance speech.

“I want to thank Warner Bros. for casting me in this piece-of-sh**, god-awful movie,” she said [via MTV], going on to mock the rest of her cast. “I’d like to thank the rest of the cast. To give a really bad performance like mine, you need to have really bad actors.”

12 Alan Cumming – Nightcrawler

Back when Alan Cumming was still in the frame to reprise his role as Nightcrawler in X-Men: The Last Stand, the Scottish actor shocked journalists with his response to the news Bryan Singer would not be returning for the third installment.

“I’m not disappointed, I can’t deny it,” Cumming said [via Movieweb]. “I think he’s really talented. I’m very proud of the film. I think it’s a great film. I didn’t enjoy working with him on the film.”

Evidently, Singer and Cumming didn’t see eye to eye on X-Men 2 though the source of their fractious relationship has never been divulged.

11 Ellen Page – Kitty Pryde

Ellen Page took to Facebook in 2017 to accuse director Brett Ratner of harassment during their time together on 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand. According to Page, Ratner mocked her sexuality during promotional work for the film. Page was only 18 at the time.

“‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’ He said this about me during a cast and crew ‘meet and greet’ before we began filming, X Men: The Last Stand,” Page wrote. “He looked at a woman standing next to me, ten years my senior, pointed to me and said: ‘You should f*** her to make her realize she’s gay.’”

10 Michael Fassbender – Magneto

Back in 2016, during the Toronto Film Festival’s pre-opening-night fundraising event, honoree Michael Fassbender surprised those in attendance by laying into his performance as Magneto in X-Men: Days of Future Past. According to Vulture, during a segment in which clips from several of Fassbender’s films were shown, Fassbender started “cringing and rubbing his face with embarrassment”.

“I don’t actually like that performance there, to be honest,” Fassbender said after the highlights reel finished. “I just think it’s me shouting. It’s just like [making a face and flailing his arms around] some dude shouting.”

9 Jamie Bell – Thing

Rumoured unrest on the set of Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie, coupled with the movie’s bad reviews left a bad taste in the mouth of its star, Jamie Bell. “There were several things on that movie I was clearly not privy to because I’m just an actor and I just do my stuff on set,” Bell told the Los Angeles Times.

“Everything starts with the best of intentions. A production begins with the idea to make something that’s unique and original and with integrity,” he said.

“I don’t know what happened between the launch of the voyage and the arrival. I think we were all bitterly disappointed with that film,” stated Bell.

8 Josh Brolin – Jonah Hex

Production delays, directorial changes, script rewrites, reshoots, and some pretty heavy-handed editing helped make Jonah Hex one of the most disappointing comic book movies of all time. It’s something the film’s star, Josh Brolin, is only too aware of. In fact, he revealed in an interview with the Nerdist that he hates it just as much as everyone else.

“Oh, ‘Jonah Hex,’ hated it. Hated it,” he said [via Collider]. “The experience of making it — that would have been a better movie based on what we did. As opposed to what ended up happening to it, which is going back and reshooting 66 pages in 12 days.”

7 Jennifer Garner – Elektra

While Ben Affleck bounced back from his Daredevil movie, Jennifer Garner never quite got going again after her spin-off effort, Elektra, bombed. Though Garner has never spoken openly about the film, her ex-boyfriend and close friend Michael Vartan revealed to Us Weekly [via SFGate] that the Alias actress was very unhappy with how the film turned out.

“I heard [Elektra] was awful. [Jennifer] called me and told me it was awful,” Vartan said. “She had to do it because of Daredevil. It was in her contract.” Garner has never denied Vartan’s claims.

6 Edward Furlong – The Crow

The Crow: Wicked Prayer is an absolute stinker of a comic book movie and currently boasts a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

It’s star, Edward Furlong, struggled to show much in the way of enthusiasm for the role during an interview with Movieweb.

Asked about how he prepared for the film’s starring role, Furlong said: “It’s sort of like a really slow process that Lance Mungia, the director, and I went through. Initially, I was just attracted to the script because it was The Crow and I got to put on some leather pants and kick people’s ass.” Given how it turned out, he must be regretting signing up for such flimsy reasons.

5 Chloë Grace Moretz – Hit-Girl

Chloe Moretz made her name as Hit Girl in Mark Millar’s original Kick-Ass but, despite the first film holding a special place in her heart, she’s always been less enthusiastic about the sequel.

During an appearance on a panel at the Provincetown Film Festival in 2018, Moretz made those feelings crystal clear. “I love the franchise, I think the first movie was really, really special. I wish the second one had been handled in a little bit of a different way,” she said [via Cinemablend]. “Because I think we were all kind of looking forward to something a little different than what happened with it all.”

4 Kate Mara – The Invisible Woman

Kate Mara played Sue Storm in Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie and, in an interview with The Times[via Yahoo] revealed the negative aura surrounding the film made her “a little gun-shy” about seeing the finished film.

“You don’t always have to learn some incredible life lesson when making a s*** movie. Sometimes it’s just what happens,” she said. “[Fantastic Four] was a tricky shoot but you know when you know when you’re shooting it that a film isn’t going to be what you want it to be? That was not the case at all.”

3 Jamie Kennedy – The Mask

Son of the Mask saw Jamie Kennedy replace Jim Carrey as the franchise’s star, with almost unwatchable results.

Though the movie is widely regarded as one of the worst ever made, Kennedy’s biggest regret may boil down to the make-up he had to wear on the film.

“I wore it 6 days in a row, and after that it gets rough,” he told Movieweb. “I had ears in this one, and Jim Carrey didn’t in the first one, so they would like press against my real ears and cut the circulation, so I would have to like rub my ears a bit after having on the makeup to get the blood flowing again.”

2 Sylvester Stallone – Judge Dredd

Despite starring in such turkeys as Over The Top, Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot and Oscar, Sylvester Stallone’s biggest regret was reserved for another movie. “The biggest mistake I ever made was with the sloppy handling of Judge Dredd” he once declared [via Den of Geek]. “The philosophy of the film was not set in stone – by that I mean, ‘Is this going to be a serious drama or with comic overtones’, like other science fiction films that were successful? So a lotta pieces just didn’t fit smoothly.”

“The design work on it was fantastic, and the sets were incredibly real, even standing two feet away, but there was just no communication,” he stated.

1 Lori Petty – Tank Girl

Lori Petty had a very particular gripe with the way things turned out for her Tank Girl movie: it was given an R rating. “There is nothing about that movie that is R. Nothing. Except there’s a woman talking s***. That’s why they rated it R. If they were going to rate it R I should have been butt-naked all the time, running around,” she told AV Club.

Tommy Boy came out that weekend, too, which is a hysterical movie, but it was rated PG-13. Do you know how many people bought Tommy Boy tickets and went to see Tank Girl? A billion.”

Are there any other superhero actors who regretted their roles? Sound off in the comments!



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2018-10-08 03:10:25 – Jack Beresford

A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad (And Always Has Been)

WARNING: Major spoilers for A Star Is Born

A Star Is Born‘s ending undoes what could have been a Hollywood classic – but that’s not exactly Bradley Cooper’s fault. From its first version in 1937, A Star Is Born has always had a problematic resolution to its story, one that’s only got worse over the past century, and this latest version is no different.

A Star Is Born is a classic story that Hollywood loves so much it’s told it four times (with a suspiciously-similar earlier version, several failed attempts and many, many imitators). A top-of-his-game star (in 2018, Bradley Cooper’s rock star Jackson Maine) is suffering from alcoholism and in a stupor discovers a struggling artist (Lady Gaga as Ally, a waitress moonlighting in a drag bar), falling in love with both her and her talent. He provides her with a big break, sending her fame into the stratosphere just as his addictions begin to derail his career. The pair marry, but despite their love things begin to fray.

Related: Read Our A Star Is Born Review

It’s a tale of rags to riches, of falls from grace, of the power of love, and personal identity within all of that. And, for much of the runtime, A Star Is Born 2018 is genuinely a great version of all those stories. Gaga’s first major concert leaves you floating, Cooper shows mental affliction with grace, both perform their songs incredibly (to actual live crowds, no less), and are utterly believable as troubled lovers. It is, for much of its runtime, a very good film worthy of that deafening hype.

However, everything implodes into a black hole of pretentiousness as what could have been a great film its own right has to follow through on being called A Star Is Born

  • This Page: The Problem With A Star Is Born’s Ending
  • Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad
  • Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

What Happens In A Star Is Born’s Ending

We’ll stick with Cooper’s take for now before going deeper into the past. A Star Is Born‘s third act is kicked off by Ally winning the Grammy for Best New Artist – a major step for her career, undercut entirely by Jack drunkenly taking to the stage with her and relieving himself on live TV. He goes into rehab and she wrestles with where her focus should lie, eventually deciding to try and protect her recovering husband. She cancels her European tour when her agent, Rez, blocks the duo playing together.

As a result, Jack kills himself. He’s confronted by a seething Rez who has no sympathies or expectations of sobriety and states outright Jack’s ruining his wife’s career. When she matter-of-fact states the tour cancellation, he sees the impact of his actions and, while she plays a concert, he hangs himself in their garage.

Related: Every Song On A Star Is Born’s Soundtrack

This breaks Ally at first, leaving her emotionally distraught, before her understanding the meaning of Jack’s sacrifice – to enable her to truly become the star he always saw – helps her pull through. The film ends at a tribute concert in Jack’s memory. “My name is Ally Maine.” she declares before singing “I’ll Never Love Again”, a song based on their relationship they wrote together while he was recovering. A flashback shows the pair singing, she looks through the camera at the audience, the end.

Why A Star Is Born’s Ending Is Bad

Removing the ending of all presentation and self-imposed importance (a character looking into the camera at the end is an overused trope that Cooper simply doesn’t earn), in just writing down the events of A Star Is Born its problems should be obvious.

Jack decides to kill himself to save his wife, committing suicide because it’s the only way to set her free. This comes about two hours into a film which has slowly built up its numerous interpersonal relationships, and so comes as a drastic and rather unearned turn. Now, there is an argument to be made about accuracy to the unpredictability of mental illness, but given the intimacy audiences had with both Jack and Ally up until this moment, that doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. A Star Is Born, plainly, presents suicide as the only way out. It’s meant to come across as a selfless act but still values success as a true route to happiness, meaning anything emotional about the “gesture” is laced with hypocrisy.

But it’s what comes after and Ally’s coming to terms with her loss that’s so disquieting. For all her innate talent being the drive of the story and her freely made decision to step back what motivated Jack to kill himself, the final scene makes everything about Jack; the mononymous singer for the first time takes on her husband’s surname at his concert, where she performs a song that he helped her write in her original singer style. The suggestion is meant to be that Jack was holding her back, but in the shadow of the previous two hours the strange implication is that the act of a true star being born came from the adversity of Jack’s sacrifice. Making Ally’s success symbiotic to her dead husband is already heavily in the text of the film, but the final scene makes her final ascension even more indebted to his drastic act.

It’s hard to not read A Star Is Born‘s ending as trivializing suicide down to a plot point to give the fundamentally broken male lead the defining role in its female protagonist’s arc. It’s a weird move to make in 2018, although don’t believe this is just the product of an 80-year-old movie being remade. There’s something flawed at the heart of A Star Is Born.

Page 2: A Star Is Born’s Ending Has Always Been Bad

The True Story Behind A Star Is Born’s Ending Explains The Problem

There have been four versions of A Star Is Born: the 1937 Hollywood-skewering original starring Janet Gaynor and Frederick March, the 1954 musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason, the 1976 shift to the music industry with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, and the latest Cooper/Gaga release. Each one has its own quirks, but all endeavor to tell the same story of love and fame intertwined, and all have the same basic ending. But the 1937 version isn’t the start. While A Star Is Born‘s narrative is a fiction, it’s very much based on truth; each movie is rooted heavily in the entertainment industry of the time – Hollywood for the 1937 and 1954 versions, music for 1976 and 2018 – and aims to tell an encapsulating story. There are some real-life events that inspired it.

The established star falling for an unknown as she climbs to the top was seen in actors Barbara Stanwyck and Frank Fay’s relationship, with the pair marrying in 1928 when the former was an unknown after starring in a Broadway show together. Their marriage fell apart after she rose above him and he fell into alcoholism. They separated in 1935 after seven years of marriage, two years before A Star Is Born was released. This appears to have been composited with the death of silent film actor John Bowers, who died at sea in 1936 after failing to win a part (whether it was a suicide or not is unclear). There are others (as we’ll see) but these are regarded as the ones who powered the 1937 version.

Related: Lady Gaga Fans Are Trolling Venom With Fake Bad Reviews

Of course, there’s one key distinction between inspiration and movie: in real life, it was two unrelated stories. There are the famous lovers who piggyback success and the past-it star who takes his own life, but in all cases these two aspects are entirely independent; the woman goes on to greater success by cutting the man out, while elsewhere another man falls from grace. Both stories epitomize Hollywood together, and taken alongside each other rather than melded have an ingrained believability. A Star Is Born trades that for something more streamlined in having the suicide be the culmination of the romance, but it’s also idealistic and wistful, losing the real moral of either.

This is reflected in what is regarded as a proto-Star Is Born, the 1932 film What Price Hollywood? Released five years before the 1937 version and produced also by David O. Selznick (and directed by George Cukor, who was approached for the first A Star Is Born and directed the first remake), this is regarded as something of a dry run at the story. Obviously from the release year it can’t share the same real-life inspirations (although, because this is the Golden Age of Hollywood, there are others pointed to), but the core concept and even smaller story beats are there, albeit with one massive difference: the leads are not romantically involved. Lowell Sherman’s Max drunkenly finds Constance Bennett’s Mary and helps make her a star, eventually killing himself after he sees realizes how far he’s fallen and is hurting his friend, while Mary’s suffers an ill-fated marriage that breaks down due to her absences filming and is reconciled at the end.

Watched today, What Price Hollywood? has a cynicism about the film industry ahead of its time despite ultimately being a movie romanticizing Hollywood – and at the core of this is the tragic story of Max and its impact on Mary’s life. The title question is apt.

How The Remakes Have Tried To “Fix” The Ending

In contrast to What Price Hollywood?, A Star Is Born 1937 carries a self-awareness and charm, but in bridging the romantic and the career side of protagonist Esther creates the problematic suicide reading. It’s not helped by dated elements, including the defining part of Esther’s ascension being the actress known as Vicki Lester taking on her husband’s name with a declaration “This is Mrs. Norman Maine“. It works given the time period, but even 16 years later needed an update.

Related: Watch the Trailer For A Star Is Born

The 1954 version is, for the most part, a beat-for-beat remake, just with dance number expansion to make it a musical, but it does make some strides to justifying the ending. The toll that caring for a drunk has on Judy Garland’s Vicki Lester is shown gradually, most upsettingly in an off-stage breakdown she immediately returns to filming from: an unavoidable presentation of the line between art and performer. But, ultimately, it ends in the same way: Norman Maine overhears Vicki’s plans to quit acting to care for her husband, so he feigns going for a swim and drowns himself; after a traumatic period and being unmasked at her funeral (the invasion of the press), Vicki returns to the public eye where she declares herself “Mrs. Norman Maine“. Every issue discussed is here.

The 1976’s A Star Is Born is overall incredibly melodramatic, nowhere less than its handling of the ending. What it should be praised for is its attempts at giving the female lead a greater sense of autonomy: throughout Streisand’s Esther makes decisions that power the narrative, not just being led along by Kristoffersen as those who came before her, but that’s lost thuddingly in the finale. After his meltdown, John Howard has imposed isolation – not rehab – and when returning home immediately sleeps with a reporter wanting an interview for Esther. The couple tries to power past this, but John figures he’s still broken and crashes his car at high speeds. Again, Esther is sad before taking his name (and singing at a tribute event).

Like we’ve already explored with A Star Is Born 2018, all versions have tried to provide their own contemporary spin on the tale to iron out its kinks, yet all wind up having to repeat the same suicide-anger-name triple-tap that doesn’t belong. A degree can be accounted to the changing times, but that ignores that the original trio of movies released over nearly 40 years, and that Cooper wasn’t able to address it either.

Page 3: Why Bradley Cooper Couldn’t Fix A Star Is Born

Why Bradley Cooper Can’t Fix A Star Is Born

Bradley Cooper certainly tries to bring a modern slant to the worn tale of A Star Is Born. He invests heavily in making Jack and Ally’s opposite trajectories operate independently – Jack is suffering from tinnitus before he’s heard a note of “La Vie En Rose”, while Ally’s SNL appearance is deemed to contradict his advice – while making the love story more immediate. It’s a bigger story, more personal and considerably more consummately paced.

But, like all the others, the ending hits a snag. And some of his decisions make it worse. The method of final descent is different, with the awards show upset and rehab undone not by Maine going off the rails again as in every other take, but rather by Ally’s agent calling his supposed bluff. It’s implied from the British Rez knowing when exactly Jackson first toured across the pond that he was once a fan, now disillusioned with his hero, making him a millennial scapegoat to any affronting reading.

Related: 2018 Fall Movie Preview: The 30 Films to See

This generational push and pull could have been what sent A Star Is Born to greatness. Sam Elliott’s speech about there only being twelve notes played over and over, with the majesty coming from how the artist uses them is a beautiful sentiment that sees Cooper self-justifying another remake and appears like a zen view on the entertainment business that birthed it. Except it isn’t, because this idea is also trying to explain the ending, claiming that the music industry is cyclical and that stars are born and then new stars are born later; Jack’s death is enabling that. What the film seems to miss is that for one state to ever enter another, a star must always die. Ally will fall too. The raw textual argument is that the failures are as eternal as the successes, raising the question of worth, yet the film provides no further exploration and presents it as somehow immediately uplifting.

And that’s the hump that A Star Is Born 2018, like its predecessors, can’t get over. The story thinks it’s a biting, self-aware take on itself, but it’s too close to the subject to see that it’s really just propagating a harsh cycle. This isn’t helped by the film being weighted by so much – the casting of Lady Gaga, his writer-director-producer-actor whammy, even Sam Elliott as the Sam Elliott-type – although those concerns are also the key explanation for what’s really going on.

A Star Is Born Only Exists Because Of Ego

Throughout this article, there’s been one question dangling unspoken. Why are there four versions of A Star Is Born anyway? It’s a story that is flawed and dated, on a topic which has been tackled in more films than any other. Yes, each movie got serious Oscar nominations and wins, but that alone isn’t enough to justify going back. The true answer is enlightening.

1954’s A Star Is Born was conceived as a bid to restart Judy Garland’s career after it stalled over the 1940s. 1976’s A Star Is Born was Barbra Streisand’s attempt (along with then-husband Jon Peters) to boost her standing in Hollywood. And 2018’s A Star Is Born is Bradley Cooper’s grand attempt to win the Oscar that he believes he deserves (his entire post-Hangover career is a carefully played game of chess with a Golden Baldie the King). There are studio concerns too (before Cooper, Warner Bros had been attempting to get a remake off the ground since the early 2010s, although as a Beyonce vehicle has the same career expansion goals), but those are the primary purposes of each version. A Star Is Born is a vanity project on repeat.

Related: A Star Is Born Is An Oscar Favorite – But Could An Infamous Producer Hurt Its Chances?

Now, vanity projects needn’t be bad, and indeed a lot of good comes from each of these attempts. Indeed, each was ultimately successful in both their primary and commercial goals: Garland’s career was rejuvenated; Streisand won her second Oscar; and Cooper’s currently the front-runner in multiple categories for next year’s Academy Awards.

But this aspect appears to be why each version of A Star Is Born struggles to understand the real meaning of its ending. Each powering force believes this movie will be what takes them being a Norman/Jack Maine to a new Esther/Ally while missing that it’s built into the story to be impossible. They believe so much in the two contradictory Hollywood legends wholesale, so don’t see that the story is almost warning against such a thing.

A Star Is Born Is No Longer Needed

In recent years, we’ve seen Hollywood’s reliable rotation of movies about itself take a genuinely incisive slant. 2015’s Best Picture Winner Birdman was an ostentatious exploration of ego that too ended with the protagonist committing suicide, but there it was with the wry critique that fame and adoration are fleeting and that such a bold act was the only way for the self-involved hero to reach the heights he dreamed of. Then there’s 2017’s almost-Best Picture Winner La La Land, which was a celebration of Hollywood-gone-by looking at love in a city of stars, eventually concluding that success required the sacrifice of the central relationship.

Together, these take on all the ideas that A Star Is Born is playing with and apply them in a more thoughtful way. The messages are more widely applicable and their endnotes have considerably less of the hypocrisy. Birdman and La La Land may find joy in the arts, but they also uncover the trials of creativity and fame, keeping the brutal truths in earshot while presenting from a position of success.

A Star Is Born 2018 is a good movie, an undeniable achievement for both Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga. But there is a flaw at the heart of the tale that just doesn’t ring true. Unless it’s made with a completely revisionist, ego-less eye, in twenty years we do not need another one.

More: Every Version Of A Star Is Born Ranked, From Garland To Gaga



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2018-10-06 01:10:52 – Alex Leadbeater

Kevin Smith Slams Trolls Who Think Marvel Pays Him for Good Press

Kevin Smith clarified that no one is paying him for any of his opinions, after some fans accused him of being in Marvel’s pocket. Dubbed one of the poster boys of the thriving comic fan community, Smith has been very vocal about his views, especially regarding both the MCU and the DCEU.

With comic book movies dominating Hollywood, fans are continuously treated to superhero films from various studios regularly, mostly from either Marvel or DC. The current talk of the town is Captain Marvel starring Brie Larson, after its first trailer debuted last week, and as usual, people from the geek community offered their own sentiments about the teaser, fostering discussions among themselves. However, Smith didn’t exactly have a grand time online, after some accused him of getting money from Marvel to praise said trailer.

Related: Everything That WASN’T In The Captain Marvel Trailer

On the latest episode of his podcast, Fatman Beyond, Smith addressed the issue, and strongly denied that he’s being paid by Marvel in exchange for good press. At the same time, he also called out internet trolls who continue to subscribe to this idea, after he received a social media message accusing him of such behavior following his review of the Captain Marvel trailer.

“I’m just going to say this. I thought it would go without saying, I thought I’d never have to say this, but I saw a tweet today cause I retweeted the f***ing trailer for Captain Marvel and talked about how I dug and sh*t like f**king taking every nickel I have, Marvel and there was like a couple people like most people ‘you’re f***ing right! F***king Kev well-said, lead us to the promised land!’ you know, everyone on the same page. But there was a very small percentage, about five tweets, going like ‘how much are they paying you to say this bullshit, man? Are you shilling for Marvel?’ And I just want to f***ing record saying you’re crazy if you think Marvel has to pay anybody to say something nice about them or to hip people to movies that are coming particularly to an audience that’s pre-sold.”

“I’ll just flat out deny it. I’ll be honest, nobody f***king pays me to say nice things. If they do, I’ll let you know. I just like to talk about the sh*t I like to talk about and that f***ing trailer I dug. I was like ‘oh sh*t! F***ing A I can’t wait!’ and guess like some people if they don’t react to it they think like you must be paid by these fools. I’m just enthusiastic, I swear to you I don’t get any f***ing money. They don’t have to pay me. That’s the beauty of f***ing fandom, man. They figured out a long time ago how to harness the fan base, they’ll do all the work for us. I’m just a little more high profile and vociferous than the average f***ing bear, but no. Nobody has ever f***ing given me a dime to say any nice things or to say any of the things that I say.”

The sad truth is, Smith isn’t the only one who gets accused of supposedly taking bribes from Disney and Marvel. One look at any social media platform, and it’s difficult not to see something similar to the messages that Smith got. What people tend to forget is that it’s been 10 years since the MCU launched, and over those years, the franchise has had its ups and downs. It’s just that, at this point, they’ve pretty much figured out what their target audience wants. Admittedly, the MCU is not everyone’s cup of tea, and that’s fine, but to shame anyone who’s open about liking what they put out in their cinematic universe is totally wrong.

Despite this controversy, Smith will continue to be a huge part of the world of superheroes onscreen. Aside from being a fan, he’s been involved in several projects, having directed episodes of both Supergirl and The Flash. He even hosted the premiere of DC Daily, DC Universe’s daily streaming news show. When looked at that way, accusations of Smith being biased toward Marvel Studios become even less credible, as if anything, one would think his bias would lean toward the company giving him so many jobs.

More: WB Needs To Make More Superman Movies, Says Kevin Smith

Source: Fatman Beyond



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2018-09-29 07:09:52 – Ana Dumaraog